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Signs of a bad economy?

Old 12-03-10, 05:53 PM
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Signs of a bad economy?

I've noticed quite a deterioration in the quality of the roads around Encinitas, Solana Beach and other cities in North County San Diego. I'm wondering if this is purely a local phenomenon, or whether people in other cities are experiencing the same thing.
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Old 12-03-10, 11:25 PM
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I ride south from Orange County pretty often. I've always thought that San Diego County needed to raise some road tax money from somewhere. The roads along the coast are terrible.

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Old 12-03-10, 11:41 PM
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I ride through Santa Ana Garden Grove and Westminster everyday. The roads are terrible, Tiajuans has better roads.
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Old 12-04-10, 12:07 AM
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Well, how are the authorities/municipalities gonna fix the roads, when we all don't want new taxes? It is only gonna get worse.
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Old 12-04-10, 12:09 AM
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I've always noted a reduction in road quality when going from Oregon to California. Been that way since the 90s, probably further back than that.

I'll feel more prepared to answer your question after another winter of studded tires on the roads around here.
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Old 12-04-10, 09:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Jed19
Well, how are the authorities/municipalities gonna fix the roads, when we all don't want new taxes? It is only gonna get worse.
Guess they'll have to layoff some cubicle workers so they can properly maintain the roads...
/sarc
/political

Last edited by snowman40; 12-04-10 at 09:57 AM. Reason: Forgot to close political statement.....
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Old 12-04-10, 10:57 AM
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roads, bike lanes, and the san luis rey river path in o-side seem good. and i think there's some construction and repair nearby that's funded by tarp money. i dunno. nothing unusually bad that i can see.
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Old 12-04-10, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Jed19
Well, how are the authorities/municipalities gonna fix the roads, when we all don't want new taxes? It is only gonna get worse.
Maybe they should try cutting out the enormous amount of waste.
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Old 12-04-10, 03:38 PM
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The roads are one of the first things to go when the economy is the way it is. Priorities will have to be made...........but the pain has not gotten bad enough here in SoCal.....it will soon though.
Now that was cheery....geeze!
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Old 12-04-10, 06:18 PM
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Originally Posted by cjbruin
Maybe they should try cutting out the enormous amount of waste.
Good idea. Provide for us some examples of waste that can be cut.
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Old 12-04-10, 07:18 PM
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Originally Posted by rubic
Good idea. Provide for us some examples of waste that can be cut.


We should start there and work our way out to the state borders...
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Old 12-04-10, 08:37 PM
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Coast highway from Carlsbad down to La Jolla has always been bad. Maybe it's just not easy to keep up. Not exactly a good solid foundation to build on to begin with. Supposedly there is a project to begin soon that will more or less rebuild it all.
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Old 12-04-10, 09:36 PM
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Originally Posted by robertkat
Coast highway from Carlsbad down to La Jolla has always been bad.
Bingo! In the seven years I have been riding, I can't remember that stretch of road ever being good. In my neighborhood, Pasadena has decent roads, San Marino has great roads, and South Pasadena has horrible roads.

I had to do an analysis of a city's financial health in grad school. I chose Poway. In 2001, the city had a "rainy day fund" of $48 million. Its roads were decent at best at that time, but Poway Unified's schools were top notch. They still are. The same can be said of schools in Solana Beach, Encinitas, Del Mar, San Marino and South Pasadena. While school districts and cities are separate entities, there is a close relationship.
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Old 12-04-10, 11:51 PM
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Up in the Santa Monica's, Little Sycamore Cyn Rd got resurfaced about a year ago, and it didn't seem to me to really need it. When Little Sycamore crosses the county line into Ventura and becomes Yerba Buena Rd, the road surface turns real bad, full of cracks. Looks like it has needed resurfacing for 10 years. Go figure.
Generally, along PCH in Malibu and along Mulholland Hwy, road conditions seem ok.
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Old 12-05-10, 01:21 AM
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The roads are intentionally bad to keep cyclists aware of their surroundings at all times.
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Old 12-09-10, 03:09 PM
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It looks like things might be improving in some areas according to the latest SDBC newsletter:

Solana Beach plans bike lanes on 101
The city of Solana Beach is planning improvements to its 1.2-mile section of Coast Hwy 101, including reducing the width of medians to make room for bike lanes on the west side of 101.

The city wants to turn their main drag into a more pedestrian-friendly shopping and dining area, and to slow traffic to make the area a destination, rather than an alternative to the I-5 freeway.
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Old 12-09-10, 05:55 PM
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Originally Posted by CbadRider
It looks like things might be improving in some areas according to the latest SDBC newsletter:

Solana Beach plans bike lanes on 101
The city of Solana Beach is planning improvements to its 1.2-mile section of Coast Hwy 101, including reducing the width of medians to make room for bike lanes on the west side of 101.

The city wants to turn their main drag into a more pedestrian-friendly shopping and dining area, and to slow traffic to make the area a destination, rather than an alternative to the I-5 freeway.
Hey, that is good news! Hwy 101 in Solana Beach, especially near Villa de la Valle, is one of the worst roads in North County.
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Old 12-09-10, 06:15 PM
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There are some real big pot holes here in Point Loma. Some are so big they can even mess with your vehicle alignment.
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Old 12-09-10, 07:50 PM
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You guys are *****ing!, try riding in Los Angeles on our "bike lanes", you will be able to race Roubaix without crashing.
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Old 12-09-10, 08:26 PM
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I've come across the topic of funding for roads on these forums very few times. Not to say it doesn't exist, but I've found little that talks about the fact that those that think they own the road, really don't own the road, in a literal sense. User fees (primarily gas tax) do not make up a significant majority of road funds and it is only decreasing for a few factors as is touched upon in an article I posted (it's informative without being technical).

I find it appalling that (if this is true) that there were advertisements about charging bicyclists to fund roads in the pac NW, as mentioned in one thread (it was registration or something like that).

I'm sure it could be argued that a transportation network is relevant outside of just personal use, but for goods and services as well; basically, it's a very high impact network that is hard to really quantify, but toll roads are surely one way to help with this. I feel that people view many parts of public infrastructure as public goods, and are entitled to them, and don't really question them. They are very costly though, and I sort of scratch my head (though not having done a lot of research) on why taxes on gas are not raised. It seems like those in office wait until there is a problem or budding problem before they decide to do anything about it. I've heard little mention in my state about raising gas taxes. It's probably a little more complex than just simply raising taxes. Land-use, fuel efficiency, alternative fuels, public transportation, all factor into it. I understand that people aren't necessarily big on taxes, but the data is out there.



Here are a few articles/reports:

Fueling Transportation Finance: A Primer on the Gas Tax (save as a file if article does not show up) Some key findings are at the bottom of my post.

Analysis Finds Shifting Trends in Highway Funding: User Fees Make Up Decreasing Share


As for your question, I've only been riding my bike for a few years in the road and stay along many of the same routes. However, I notice along this route, there are definitely parts where there could be improvement and a lot of the patchwork on other roads aren't so much of a problem for cars, but on a bicycle, it makes trying to ride on the side of a lane more questionable.

I think our transportation infrastructure has some questions on how sustainable it is from a funding standpoint, since that is along the lines of what you are asking. I think the economy factors in, as it would seem something like transportation requires a hefty threshold to fund. If roads have reached a certain point in the lifetime before its subsequent maintenance, and people are driving less (and paying less taxes on fuel) that threshold will take longer to reach and may also have an impact on raising funding to match federal dollars (which seems like one of its purposes is as an incentive for states to raise their taxes, but seems to fail if that is one purpose).



Here is a summary from the article:



Findings:

A study of the collection, allocation, and use of federal and state taxes on motor fuels— the "gas tax"—in recent decades finds that:

More than one-third of the $133 billion in total U.S. revenue available for highway spending in 2001 came from federal and state gas taxes. State gas taxes alone made up 21.6 percent of all highway revenues that year. The state gas tax is also the largest single source of highway funding for the states.


-After years of steady growth, federal and state gas tax receipts have plateaued in the late 1990s. When accounting for inflation, federal and state gas tax revenues are actually declining.


-Twenty-eight states have raised their gas tax rates since 1992, but only three raised it enough to keep pace with inflation. Although the average state gas tax rate increased by 8.7 percent, in real terms, the average gas tax rate declined by about 14 percent. In other words, many states do not have the same buying power they did in 1991.


-Thirty states restrict the use of their gas tax revenues to highway purposes only. Such restrictions limit states' ability to finance mass transit, congestion and air quality improvement projects, and other options not related to highways.


-The distribution of the gas tax within some states appears to penalize cities and urban areas. In several states, urban areas act as "donor regions." These areas contribute significantly more in tax receipts than they receive in allocations from their state's highway fund or through direct local transfers.

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Old 12-10-10, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Chaco
Hey, that is good news! Hwy 101 in Solana Beach, especially near Villa de la Valle, is one of the worst roads in North County.
I was surprised at how bad the roads are in Rancho Santa Fe. I started commuting through there earlier this year. Some of the streets are so cracked they look like cobblestones. I guess they have better things to spend money on than fixing the roads.
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Old 12-10-10, 09:15 PM
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Originally Posted by CbadRider
I was surprised at how bad the roads are in Rancho Santa Fe. I started commuting through there earlier this year. Some of the streets are so cracked they look like cobblestones. I guess they have better things to spend money on than fixing the roads.
I think they do that to keep traffic to a minimum. Also, I believe a large portion of those roads are county, not city. Go figure. The highest "awful roads to richest neighborhood" ratios are in Sabre Springs and 4S Ranch areas. You need one of those 8" travel downhill MTBs to get through there without cracked teeth. No wonder all the rich people drive SUVs.
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Old 12-16-10, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by robertkat
Coast highway from Carlsbad down to La Jolla has always been bad. Maybe it's just not easy to keep up. Not exactly a good solid foundation to build on to begin with. Supposedly there is a project to begin soon that will more or less rebuild it all.
I don't know why you all are picking on PCH. I am an Irvine brat where the roads are all silk and just this week rode this section in the dark without complaint. You all must be Del Martians and use to your private 1000 foot driveway pavement.
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Old 12-16-10, 09:40 PM
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Originally Posted by lpolliard
I don't know why you all are picking on PCH. I am an Irvine brat where the roads are all silk and just this week rode this section in the dark without complaint. You all must be Del Martians and use to your private 1000 foot driveway pavement.
Irvine has some rough spots....
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Old 12-17-10, 12:34 PM
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They've been re-paving all the highways and city-roads in my area (Santa Barbara). Road construction everywhere! CalTrans won a major victory after over 10-years of debate and they're finally able to expand a 2-lane section of 101 between Montecito and Carpinteria. Reworking an overpass & onramp near the Bacara resort.


Originally Posted by rubic
Good idea. Provide for us some examples of waste that can be cut.
Read the Employer Costs for Employee Compensation survey from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. As of December 2009, state and local government employees earned total compensation of $39.60 an hour, compared to $27.42 an hour for private industry workers-a difference of over 44 percent. This includes 35 percent higher wages and nearly 69 percent greater benefits. Data from the U.S. Census Bureau similarly show that in 2007 the average annual salary of a California state government employee was $53,958, nearly 32 percent greater than the average private sector worker ($40,991).

Pisses me off to no end when I stand in line at the DMV for hours watching these trailer-trash drop-outs sit at their desks surfing the internet and ignoring everyone. Pretty much all DMV-related things like licence and vehicle-registration can be done on-line. Enter your licence#, name, address, credit-card# into a form, push the button and that's it!
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