Tandem Cycling A bicycle built for two. Want to find out more about this wonderful world of tandems? Check out this forum to talk with other tandem enthusiasts. Captains and stokers welcome!

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Old 03-05-18, 01:11 PM
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JamesTee
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New to tandem cycling

Hi folks. Iíve a few questions about tandems. Firstly, as tandems heavier than a standard cycle and of course will carry two or more riders, are the wheels in any way tougher or stronger in their build? Secondly, when choosing a hub and axle, is it necessary to go for a tandem specific part? Lastly, can tandem wheels be secured using a quick release skewer of should it be a solid axle?
Many thanks in advance.
JT
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Old 03-05-18, 02:04 PM
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Tandem wheels are generally stronger than single bike wheels. However, I think some teams use what are essentially single bike wheels. I believe that hubs and axles are pretty much the same as single bikes. Heavier, stronger teams or those that ride rough roads might choose stronger hubs & axles.

We have always used standard quick release levers on our tandems.

Others may have other opinions.
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Old 03-05-18, 02:38 PM
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Typically the tandem standard rear wheel spacing is 145 which is wider then singles. Some here have custom bikes which have been built with 135 rear spacing but that is not typical. Santana uses 160 for their builds which is unique to them and though things are readily available they are not as easy as the 145 but neither are something you will walk into the typical bike shop and have in stock. Many of the tandems come with 40 hole wheels and rims though lower spoke counts are available on up-speced bikes. Most tandems come with quick release skewers but you are seeing Thru axles coming on some of the custom bikes now.
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Old 03-13-18, 06:08 PM
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Yes

Originally Posted by JamesTee View Post
Hi folks. Iíve a few questions about tandems. Firstly, as tandems heavier than a standard cycle and of course will carry two or more riders, are the wheels in any way tougher or stronger in their build? Secondly, when choosing a hub and axle, is it necessary to go for a tandem specific part? Lastly, can tandem wheels be secured using a quick release skewer of should it be a solid axle?
Many thanks in advance.
JT
Tandems are carrying far more than a touring bike will probably ever carry - and that's an unloaded tandem. Load a tandem up with touring equipment and perhaps even a trailer, and you've got WAY more load and demands on a tandem than a single (half) bike.

Spoke count, quality, rim specs and hubs are oftentimes ALL beefed up. Higher spoke counts are usually a given. Higher quality spokes (double or triple butted) are also recommended. But rim strength is also very important. Luckily there are today a wide range of deep-V rims available which build stronger wheels for tandems.

Front hubs take higher braking forces, but it's rear hubs that really must meet tandem demands, especially off road. A mountain tandem generates incredible torque loads with two riders and low gearing on steep terrain. Combine that with the fact that the rear wheel can hardly ever break loose, you're exceeding the max torque many hubs can take. For example, standard Shimano hubs have (or did) a rounded aluminum spline interface between cassette body and hubshell. This aluminum spline cannot take tandem torques. I've spun one off on a simple fire road climb I didn't even consider difficult.

Even tandem-rated hubs fail. I've destroyed three Hugi and two Phil Wood tandem hubs on the mountain tandem. The only two hubs I know that haven't been destroyed regularly by tandem use are the Chris King tandem and Rohloff tandem speed hub. These are designed with high tandem torque in mind. Other makers such as Hadley also have tandem rated hubs.

Forks are also an issue. I would NEVER put a fork from a single (half) bike on a tandem, be it road, mountain, rigid or suspended. Only exception you'll find is the Fox 36/40 forks that people here utilize. I'm one of them. But call Fox and ask 'em about using their forks on tandems and they will tell you unequivocally NOT TO USE THEIR FORKS ON TANDEMS!

Disk brakes usually use the largest rotors available. I'm running a 203mm on the front of my mountain tandem and it's perfect.

Carbon rims can present an issue as well if a tandem isn't utilizing disc brakes. I know several road racers who've fried carbon rims on descents. Tandems blow tires off rims on long descents and thus either utilize a disc brake or drum drag brake to take speed off. I would be wary of building a carbon wheelset for a road tandem with rim brakes unless the rims are spec'd specifically for tandem use. You do NOT want carbon rim failure to occur on a long, fast road descent!

Other things like drivetrain items (small chainrings) need to be chosen with durability in mind. Don't use an aluminum small ring on a tandem. It will not last.

Those are just a few items that came to mind. There are undoubtedly others that I've omitted. I hope that helps.
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Old 03-14-18, 11:21 AM
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Originally Posted by LV2TNDM View Post
Tandems are carrying far more than a touring bike will probably ever carry - and that's an unloaded tandem. Load a tandem up with touring equipment and perhaps even a trailer, and you've got WAY more load and demands on a tandem than a single (half) bike.

Spoke count, quality, rim specs and hubs are oftentimes ALL beefed up. Higher spoke counts are usually a given. Higher quality spokes (double or triple butted) are also recommended. But rim strength is also very important. Luckily there are today a wide range of deep-V rims available which build stronger wheels for tandems.

Front hubs take higher braking forces, but it's rear hubs that really must meet tandem demands, especially off road. A mountain tandem generates incredible torque loads with two riders and low gearing on steep terrain. Combine that with the fact that the rear wheel can hardly ever break loose, you're exceeding the max torque many hubs can take. For example, standard Shimano hubs have (or did) a rounded aluminum spline interface between cassette body and hubshell. This aluminum spline cannot take tandem torques. I've spun one off on a simple fire road climb I didn't even consider difficult.

Even tandem-rated hubs fail. I've destroyed three Hugi and two Phil Wood tandem hubs on the mountain tandem. The only two hubs I know that haven't been destroyed regularly by tandem use are the Chris King tandem and Rohloff tandem speed hub. These are designed with high tandem torque in mind. Other makers such as Hadley also have tandem rated hubs.

Forks are also an issue. I would NEVER put a fork from a single (half) bike on a tandem, be it road, mountain, rigid or suspended. Only exception you'll find is the Fox 36/40 forks that people here utilize. I'm one of them. But call Fox and ask 'em about using their forks on tandems and they will tell you unequivocally NOT TO USE THEIR FORKS ON TANDEMS!

Disk brakes usually use the largest rotors available. I'm running a 203mm on the front of my mountain tandem and it's perfect.

Carbon rims can present an issue as well if a tandem isn't utilizing disc brakes. I know several road racers who've fried carbon rims on descents. Tandems blow tires off rims on long descents and thus either utilize a disc brake or drum drag brake to take speed off. I would be wary of building a carbon wheelset for a road tandem with rim brakes unless the rims are spec'd specifically for tandem use. You do NOT want carbon rim failure to occur on a long, fast road descent!

Other things like drivetrain items (small chainrings) need to be chosen with durability in mind. Don't use an aluminum small ring on a tandem. It will not last.

Those are just a few items that came to mind. There are undoubtedly others that I've omitted. I hope that helps.
Wow. Thatís a lot to take in but I have to say, by far the most useful information I have received. I have a low budget and therefore heavy tandem that has been sat for two years sheltered but outside. Iíve recently started riding and have been looking at maintenance and upgrade possibilities. Despite my questions to cycle repair shops and the likes, nobody has given as much valuable info and that thatís been given has been sketchy at best.
I have questions about pannier racks, mudguards, chain guards, crank shorteners or pedal blocks, axles thru and solid, hubs, wheels/rims and there doesnít seem to be many in the know when it comes to straight answers.
Of course I understand the costly nature of going to tandem specialists and cost is a factor I need to be wary of. I need to source a trusted and ďin the knowĒ tandem repairs or supplier who will be able to help without breaking the bank. Iím in Surrey and although I now have a source of great advice from yourself, Iím lost for a place to take the bike where staff in the shop arent scared of it.
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Old 03-14-18, 12:12 PM
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With the wide variety of mountain bike components available, there are many options for tandem builds other than tandem specific components.

Part of how you build up a tandem depends on your intended use, riding style, price range and priorities. Our equipment choices are pretty much the opposite end of the spectrum from Luv2tandem.

We use mountain bike hubs with 135mm drop out spacing (DT Swiss 240) with 28 spoke deep sectioned Carbon Fiber Enve rims.

By traditional standards 28 spoke wheels for a tandem would be insane. However, Carbon Fiber rims are so strong these days, our wheels are strong and stiff. Even at a team weight north of 350lbs, and hard racing use, we've had no issues.

Also, IMHO, rim brakes work fine on a tandem for many teams. Brake choice in large measure is a function of heat dissipation. If you descend aggressively, do not use the brakes to scrub speed, and only to slow for turns, over heating is much less of an issue. We've raced in the High Sierras in California, and steep descents in Appalachia (such as Brasstown) with no issue using rim brakes.

So again, I get back to specing components for a tandem depends on priorities, riding style, and intended use.
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Old 03-15-18, 01:27 PM
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Originally Posted by JamesTee View Post
Wow. Thatís a lot to take in but I have to say, by far the most useful information I have received. I have a low budget and therefore heavy tandem that has been sat for two years sheltered but outside. Iíve recently started riding and have been looking at maintenance and upgrade possibilities. Despite my questions to cycle repair shops and the likes, nobody has given as much valuable info and that thatís been given has been sketchy at best.
I have questions about pannier racks, mudguards, chain guards, crank shorteners or pedal blocks, axles thru and solid, hubs, wheels/rims and there doesnít seem to be many in the know when it comes to straight answers.
Of course I understand the costly nature of going to tandem specialists and cost is a factor I need to be wary of. I need to source a trusted and ďin the knowĒ tandem repairs or supplier who will be able to help without breaking the bank. Iím in Surrey and although I now have a source of great advice from yourself, Iím lost for a place to take the bike where staff in the shop arent scared of it.
Hey, glad to be of some help!

Your best bet, especially considering budget, is to find an older model tandem that has been well cared for. Not that many tandem owners would mistreat a tandem, given the investment usually involved. I get the impression that there are a fair number of high-quality used tandems on the market. I look at CraigsList all the time and there's always good tandem deals to be found. They're either from the couple that either never used them much, or split up! Then there are the avid users who just can't resist upgrading to something carbon. I'm kinda in that boat... I'd LOVE to upgrade to current technology (carbon frame, belt drive timing, carbon wheels, etc.) to experience the newer and much lighter stuff.

My old Cannondale road tandem from 1993 was at the higher end of the tandem spectrum. I built it up with very nice component. The result has been an incredibly durable and trouble-free bike for 25 years. However, it's a TANK (thanks in large part to the Arai drum brake)! And upgrading to a carbon tandem would shave ten pounds. Oh, we might actually be able to climb! And if this ever happened, my tandem would be a great candidate for someone like you. I realize that I'd never be able to recover the money that it's "worth" to me. That's the nature of holding onto bikes for so long. Their used value drops so low, it's more worthwhile to keep it. Or sell it at a huge loss, but knowing it's going to someone else who can discover the joys of tandeming and be riding something solid.

Now I'm not suggesting I'm selling anytime soon, but using it as an example. You just need to find someone like me who owns a high-quality, but old model tandem. Successfully finding one is a matter of luck because you need a bike that fits TWO people and your needs and budget. So scour CraigsList and local bike for sale websites in your area. A little patience should pay off and you should be able to find a great deal eventually.

Good luck!
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Old 03-15-18, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by JamesTee View Post
I have ... heavy tandem that has been sat for two years sheltered but outside. Iíve recently started riding and have been looking at maintenance and upgrade possibilities. Despite my questions to cycle repair shops and the likes, nobody has given as much valuable info and that thatís been given has been sketchy at best.
I have questions about pannier racks, mudguards, chain guards, crank shorteners or pedal blocks, axles thru and solid, hubs, wheels/rims and there doesnít seem to be many in the know when it comes to straight answers.
So, you already have a tandem? Share the details of your machine and we can provide much more useful feedback. What parts of your existing bike would you like to change? There are so many "standards" out there that it's hard to provide generic advice.
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Old 03-15-18, 02:22 PM
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My heavy tandem is a Reflex Timberline P13. Seems they are long since obsolete and no one can get factory parts for it these days. Itís a seemingly solid enough bike that weighs in at (Iím guessing here) about 20-25kg. Perhaps more. Iím unable to find supplier specs. It came with no rack, no mudguards. Disc brake front, v brake set up on the rear but has the frame mount for rear disc set up. My little one canít quite reach the pedals on the stoker even with the seat at its lowest. Crank shorteners, Iím told, are the way forward there rather than peddle blocks. Iíd like to fit mud guards and racks front and back and am looking at the possibility of a trailer mount so we can go camping. My Mrs has her own half bike that she is nervous enough on alone and she is terrified of the tandem, being unable to see past me. She wonít even try riding it alone let alone being captain. So, itís up to me to try to figure a way round the little leg issue for the stoker seat, carry kit and if possible, prevent as much water/mud splash as possible.
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Old 03-15-18, 03:11 PM
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Did some quick searching and it appears your tandem is basically a 26 inch steel bike with standard mountain bike components on it.
The hubs are likely standard 135mm spacing in back and 100mm in front. Take a caliper or ruler to confirm.

Solid axles are fine. Stronger than quick release - and not a concern unless you plan on transporting the bike a lot, or having to remove wheels often.
If you want quick release, there are videos on line on how to convert solid axles to quick release if you want to try your hand at it.

Otherwise if you wanted to upgrade to newer wheels, you could easily find a pair of MTB wheels with disk hubs by searching online.
Focus on 36 or even 40 hole hubs if you can get them. But if it's just you and a child, you should be okay with 32 on a strong rim and spoke build.

Nearly everything else a standard bike shop should be able to help you out with: Fenders, bags, racks, chains, cassettes, etc.
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Old 03-15-18, 05:40 PM
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Been riding 'in tandem' for over 42 years and pedaled over one quarter million miles as a duo.
Buy the best you can afford; yes, a USED quality tandem is a much better deal than a new WallyMart tandem.
Do more research on the subject and see if you two can test ride a tandem from a tandem dealer bike shop (hard to find a tandem dealer with tandems in stock!).
Start off inexpensive and after a year of riding invest in a new quality bike if tandeming suits you.
Yes, prices may shock you a bit but quality lasts!
Our current custom carbon fiber tandem has over 45,000 miles on the odometer.
Expect to pay around a thousand bucks on an older quality tandem and up to 10 times hat much on a new quality machine.
Pedal on TWOgether!
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Old 03-15-18, 06:34 PM
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Originally Posted by unikid View Post
Did some quick searching and it appears your tandem is basically a 26 inch steel bike with standard mountain bike components on it.
The hubs are likely standard 135mm spacing in back and 100mm in front. Take a caliper or ruler to confirm.

Solid axles are fine. Stronger than quick release - and not a concern unless you plan on transporting the bike a lot, or having to remove wheels often.
If you want quick release, there are videos on line on how to convert solid axles to quick release if you want to try your hand at it.

Otherwise if you wanted to upgrade to newer wheels, you could easily find a pair of MTB wheels with disk hubs by searching online.
Focus on 36 or even 40 hole hubs if you can get them. But if it's just you and a child, you should be okay with 32 on a strong rim and spoke build.

Nearly everything else a standard bike shop should be able to help you out with: Fenders, bags, racks, chains, cassettes, etc.
I, too, got off my lazy butt and invested the 2.5 seconds needed to Google the thing!

This is a VERY basic tandem. It's designed for VERY casual use. How well (and safe) it rides depends a lot on the assembly. I could assemble it and make it fully functional. But it still has severe limitations. My biggest concern would be brake performance. The weight of two people on this bike will test the brake's limits.
Another example, the rear wheel is a standard freewheel hub. This is what the lowest quality bicycles are still using. Freewheels were standard equipment up until the 1980's on "bike shop quality" bikes. The problem with freewheels is axle failure. I bent and broke over ten axles in the '70's and '80's on my old BMX, road and later mountain bikes. And then the cassette hub hit the market. Chronic broken axles became a thing of the past in bicycle shops around the world.

Tandems are BRUTAL on rear hubs (as I mentioned). The problem with a freewheel is that it necessitates the use of a long section of axle from the hub body to the frame dropout. Result? Bent and broken axles - which then lead to bent and broken frame dropouts. One hard pedaling effort on the tandem you have would most likely bend or break the axle. Now you might be able to find a compatible replacement, but then you hit compatibility issues. The bike I got on my Google search has a 7-speed freewheel. You SHOULD be able to find a 7-speed cassette hub rear wheel and cassette, but it might not be easy (and you'll have to use a spacer).

If you could make one upgrade on the bike, this would be the one I would choose. Any more "upgrades" would probably not be worthwhile. As ZonaTandem said, just invest a thousand bucks in something that you'll be able to ride with joy, confidence, and most-importantly, safety.
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Old 03-15-18, 07:01 PM
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Hopefully the OP will confirm. Unfortunately it's not clear what his budget is. So a new tandem may not even be an option. Regardless of new or old, it sounds like crank shorteners are needed if it's for the child and not the wife who appears to be scared of tandeming anyway. I would suggest they ride what they have until they know how committed to tandeming they really are, or until the hub becomes an issue. If they decide they like tandeming then they can decide whether to upgrade what they have or sell the tandem and move to something better...
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Old 03-16-18, 07:26 AM
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My triple is a bike of similar spec to your tandem. As has been mentioned here, the rear axle was a weak point and needed replacement. I found that out when I took it to my local shop and had it gone through. Getting a thorough service would be my recommendation.

The advice here is good, as far as it goes. However, there is a large bias towards buying (and riding) expensive equipment. You may like riding bicycles a lot and get into tandems in a big way. Then your tandem will frustrate you and youíll want to upgrade. Or, like me, you may just like casual riding occasionally and in 25 years, youíll be on your fourth tandem and never have much invested in any of them.

Or somewhere in the middle.

However it works out, the tandem you have is better than the tandem you donít. Welcome to the club!
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Old 03-16-18, 01:16 PM
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Mudguard (fenders) and racks for your bike should be available at any local bike shop. They should be able to offer a serviceable rear wheel, too. As @LV2TNDM mentioned, upgrading to a cassette hub would be worthwhile.

There are a couple of shops in the UK with a decent selection of tandem-specific hardware. You're going to want a child stoker kit at minimum. That should include an add-on bottom bracket and chainset (crankset) that bolt to your seat tube. Here are some potentially useful links.
Explanation of what to do:
PRECISION TANDEMS - Child Stoker Kit Installation Guide, child stoker, kid-back, kidback, kid kit, tandem, riding tandem with children,
Tandems East Cranks & Pedals

Parts in the UK:
https://www.tandems.co.uk/opening-times/
Circe cycles accessories child | Circe Cycles
https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/componen...black/?geoc=US
https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/componen...eners/?geoc=US
https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/cranks/s...ilver/?geoc=US
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Old 03-18-18, 10:44 AM
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Okay, folks. Here it is. As my first post said, I’m new to tandem riding. My tandem, the Reflex Timberline P13 is a heavy steel beast. Yes there are sources of basic info on the web but non that makes any sense to me. I figured, by joining a forum, I’d be able to source some much needed advice from people like yourselves who have much more experience.
I’m a little affronted by some who seem to think that I should know it all. I don’t. I’m not perfect and I need straight forward advice from people in the know.
My better half is a nervous rider who will not entertain the idea of either captain or stoker riding on a tandem, all she does when she ‘is’ on board, is squeal like a little girl. �� our daughter, a six year old fearless little one who thinks she is 16, is more than happy on the tandem.
However, her legs are just that little bit too short for the pedals. And she sits with her feet perched on the crossbar. (Not the safest riding position I’m sure you’ll agree).
At present, our journeys consist of school run, about a mile a day and out of school activity things that we take her to three days per week, adding to those days another 2 miles a day. So perhaps 11 miles a week. The routes are mainly very quite but somewhat bumpy roads and foot/bike paths.
In the long term, we all want to take longer rides and although my Mrs. is nervous, she is committed to us riding, her on her own half bike with me and our little angel on the tandem, we hope to be able to ride further afield so we can go camping and sightseeing in good weather.
At present, my monthly budget for tinkering is about £100 ($140) if I’m lucky.

I will get outside with my Vernier Caliper at some point and take some measurements like drop out gap and the likes.

With the wish to go camping, comes the conundrum about how to carry kit. Pannier racks would usually have a pre threaded hole on the front forks and tears drop outs but in the case of this frame, these are either absent (on the rear) or occluded by the brake Caliper on the front forks.
Then there is the thought of a cargo trailer... with the stoker seat set at minimum height, the possibility of attaching at the seat post is off the table. So then a hub fixing is the next option, (please feel free to correct me if I’m wrong). Most hub trailer hitches are either designed around a quick release like the BOB Yak , which I doubt would be suitable for the wide rear axle, or require the rear axle but to be removed and used to secure the hitch. This being the case, perhaps a burley hitch nut would suffice but they come in M10 & M10.5 configurations. The existing axle isn’t long enough for me to trust using the existing hub but to hold the hitch onto it as the bolt will not fully tread back on.

As for fenders/mudguards, the same issue as the pannier rack fixing points presents... I’ve taken the bike to three shops, a major high street brand whose staff we happy that this was the very first tandem they had seen in reality, on of whom said, “wow, how did you make that?” Not entirely confidence inducing. The other two specialist family run bike shops with whom I figured I’d get some solid help, basically said, “no mate, tandems ain’t our thing” & “erm, try looking online fella”.

So alas, here I am, on what is essentially the worlds leading cycle forum, asking what is potentially the worlds largest cycling mind how, what, where I can get help and advice and parts.

I’ve looked online and yes, there are thousands of parts, thousands of videos and thousands of opinions but I’m new to this and unlike some, I don’t know where to start.
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Old 03-18-18, 01:25 PM
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Can't help with the kid.

My wife and I started on the tandem a few years ago and have put a few thousand miles on. to me, the tandem is an open road bike, not a bike to ride in heavy vehicle, bicycle or pedestrian traffic. Nor small paths requiring quick turns, acceleration or stops. We take our single bikes when doing any of that.

It would be bad enough to wreck on a single bike, but no way I want wreck with my wife on the back. Get it out in the open and put on the miles!
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Old 03-18-18, 03:45 PM
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One option would be to sell your tandem to another family and start over with something better built for touring and bolting more stuff onto it.

I am in the US but have seen others talk about Dawes tandems in other forums.

If you google "southwater dawes tandem ex hire" you will get a link to a used Dawes tandem that already has fenders (mudguards) and a rack on it.
And likely has the necessary fittings to allow even more stuff to be attached to the bike. It also looks like it is upgradeable to disk brakes in future.

If you google "evans cycles tandems" you will get a link to new Dawes tandems for sale, by Evans cycles. Evans appear to have many locations in UK and if they are selling tandems one would hope you could visit them and get proper answers to questions instead of the dumb ones you mentioned getting from other shops.

Good luck!
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Old 03-18-18, 05:43 PM
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kaos joe
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James,

Congratulations on your tandem! I wish you many a happy mile. With an enthusiastic "stoker" in the back they are lots of fun. We have 3 2-seaters.

One of the 3 is a Burley Duet road tandem, also a heavy steel beast. But a rugged one and still on the road, on semipermanent loan to a friend. He is riding it with his 7 year old grandson, who is already nagging GrandPa to ride even though it's still cold here in New York. The bike is fitted with a child conversion kit, which installs a second set of cranks higher up to accommodate short child legs. I used this setup for years with my own daughter who loved it. You would have to use your calipers to measure the outside diameter of your seat tube. Properly fitted they will not damage the bike.

These child kits, and just about anything else tandem related, are available from Tandems East in NJ. They have an online store and I have always been happy with their service. That said, I have no idea what the trials and tribulations of USA/UK shopping and shipping might be.

I hope this helps.

Joe S.
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Old 03-19-18, 11:55 AM
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JamesTee, now reading your posts, and more fully understanding what you are hoping to do I think you are really close and can do everything to get started within your budget. It looks like two thinks will get you started and on the road. First is looking for the child stoker kit. This is one I found in the UK. You would need to add crank to the included bottom bracket https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/componen...black/?geoc=US If she is pretty close and you only need a small adjustment this could for for you. https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/componen...eners/?geoc=US

Second is hauling your gear for a short family tour. A "pull behind" trailer might be best as you aren't sure of how your rear wheel will handle the additional load of your gear. This is one I found online in the UK. Halfords Single Buggy Child Bike Tr... These clamp onto the junction of the left chain stay and left seat stay at the left rear drop out and can work well for that purpose.

Lastly, it looks like the wheels on your bike are 26" and are most likely 135 spacing. You will have many lower cost options as that would be standard to mountain bikes. So should be able to get a nice durable replacement wheel if and when it might be needed.

Funny story for you, my daughter, now 41 rode with me back in the early 80 on our old Gitane tandem. We couldn't afford anything in those days even if they would have had kid stoker kits. So I took a blocks of wood and screwed toe clips and straps to it and took a smaller piece of wood without the toe clip placing it under the pedal and then bolted them together through the opening of the pedal. Got us on the road at minimal cost. and we had a blast! Best of luck, and have fun riding with your daughter.
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