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best tire for 700C rims on gravel roads ?

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best tire for 700C rims on gravel roads ?

Old 10-11-20, 12:01 PM
  #1  
preventec47
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best tire for 700C rims on gravel roads ?

I have some 700C x35 tires that have rotted in ten years of storage and I need to replace them.

I have a road drop bar tandem but I would like to be able to handle slight off road or rough road conditions and speed is not important at all.

My rims say 559mm x 22mm and I believe I could handle some wider tires than what was on the bike 700c x35.

I have been shopping a bit for tires but I dont know if there are special tires with higher pressures to handle greater payloads and I dont see any tires
marked "for use with tandems" The tires coming off must have been made with natural rubber the way they rotted and I would prefer to avoid natural rubber
if possible for that reason. Maybe there are some other benefits ? I want to use a tube as I feel they are more reliable and easier to pump up when changing etc.
and my rims have the smaller hole that uses the european fancy valve stem. I wonder also if wider tires can support more weight with less deflection than narrower tires
as that might address my objective of carrying more payload than with a single bike. Internet sources suggestions other than Amazon would be appreciated along with some brand model sizes etc.
Scott in Atlanta
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Old 10-11-20, 04:03 PM
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OneIsAllYouNeed
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There are three popular rim/tire sizes and youíve presented some references to two different ones.
559mm = 26 inch
584mm = 27.5 inch = 650b
622mm = 29 inch =700c
Note that the first number is the tireís bead seat diameter, which sets the standard. The other numbers are just names that donít always line up with measurable dimensions.
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Old 10-11-20, 06:08 PM
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Panaracer Gravelkings 700x43 have a max PSI of 60. I run my Gravelkings SS+ (700x43) at 40 psi in the rear and 25 psi in the front, and I'm 230 lbs., so 60 psi might be enough for a tandem, depending on your total weight.

The Gravelking SK (small knobs) is better for off road and SS (semi-slick) is better if you ride more pavement. There is a "+" version of each that has an extra layer of puncture protection.
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Old 10-11-20, 07:52 PM
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preventec47
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Originally Posted by tyrion View Post
Panaracer Gravelkings 700x43 have a max PSI of 60. I run my Gravelkings SS+ (700x43) at 40 psi in the rear and 25 psi in the front, and I'm 230 lbs., so 60 psi might be enough for a tandem, depending on your total weight.
The rotten tires I just took off were 700x35C with a max pressure of 90 psi. When I bought them years ago I remember specifically they were suitable for tandems.

My rims are 22mm outside to outside and the inside to inside is 19mm . I think the rims handled the 35C width tires just fine and I might try 38C just a bit wider but I cannot find
the minimum recommended rim widths for the larger or wider tires. That 19mm looks pretty puny and 43 is more than double ... so I am curious about this.

Also BTW regarding some of my previously stated dimensions..... The tag on my rims identifying the model is incorrect and it states incorrectly 559mm . If I was an absolute beginner I would be really confused. You have to have some level of confidence to say the factory is wrong.
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Old 10-11-20, 09:02 PM
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It sounds like a 700c x 37 or 38mm tire would be good for your next pair. The Panaracer "Gravelking SS Plus" or "Graveling Plus" would be good for what you've described. The "durable" versions of Teravail Rampart and Washburn are a bit sturdier. Schwalbe Marathon (E-Plus, Plus Tour, Mondial, or Almotion) tires are very tough and durable tires that are well suited to heavy loads.
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Old 12-01-20, 06:48 AM
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If you are mostly riding maintained dirt/gravel roads then I would go with the Rene Herse Barlow Pass 700x38. It's our primary tire. You can get them with an extra durable sidewall. I found that the Gravel King's have a very short life.
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Old 12-01-20, 03:08 PM
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specialized sawtooth 2bliss 700x42 have a max psi of 80 we run ours around that mark or though it is a little high for steep gravel climbs the tyre itself wears at a reasonable rate and is a nice supple comfy ride.
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Old 12-04-20, 09:34 PM
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The Barlow Pass, as mentioned above, is an exceptional tire if you don't encounter much mud or loose material with ruts.
We ride a couple of miles of gravel and dirt on at least half of our rides. Sometimes much more than that. In the summer it can be loose and rutted. In the winter it can be muddy. We are currently using the Donnelly "XPLOR USH" and are quite happy with them.
It's a 35mm tire which we run at about 70 psi for a combined bike and riders weight of about 310 pounds.

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Old 01-29-22, 01:03 PM
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I'll second having trouble with the GravelKing SS - they are quite light and we got a lot of punctures from tiny bits of glass. Better luck so far with the Specialized Sawtooth, but not a lot of miles them yet.
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