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Tweaking a Peugeot 10 speed racer for Touring

Old 04-14-15, 02:52 AM
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Tweaking a Peugeot 10 speed racer for Touring

Hi there ,

I hope this is the best place to post this . I was in the market for a Surly Long Haul Trucker when it struck me that it could be much cheaper to instead do some upgrades on my Peugeot 10 speed . The bike is a Peugeot Talisman ph8 . I have been told its similar in quality to a UO-8 . I'm thinking that if I put a mountain bike triple on it , a freewheel with a larger big cog ,P clip some racks and clamp on some bottle cages then I could tour for a fraction of the price of a new bike .The touring I'm planning on doing would be local , maybe two or three days out camping , lightly loaded .Has anyone else tried anything like this ? Would a bike like that fare well with a loadout ? Here's a picture of the bike .

The brakes would be sub standard and possibly dangerous in wet conditions but i am willing to put up with that if it means comfortable touring for a fraction of the cost of a new bike .

Thanks for reading

J
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Old 04-14-15, 04:00 AM
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maybe need to add new front and rear deraillers also.
possibly need to change the bottom bracket to switch to a triple.
chain stays may be too short for panniers.

what's the terrain like? do you absolutely need mountain gears?
and how about a trailer (bob-style or extrawheel) instead of racks?
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Old 04-14-15, 04:14 AM
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I'll be cycling around Ireland on secondary roads , there will be some steep climbs but they will be rare enough . Never thought of a trailer , that's a good idea . Ive tried out the panniers I have with a cheap flimsy rack , my heels don't hit the bag so that's all good on that front .
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Old 04-14-15, 04:17 AM
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When I first got back into touring I contemplated updating my old 10-speed but decided it would end up costing as much as buying a modern tourer. Minimum upgrades I'd recommend would be brakes, new wheels, tires, lower geared drivetrain. Your frame is also lacking braze-ons and I'm guessing is very flexy. Modern touring bikes are purpose build for loaded touring and have come a long way since the old days.

OTOH: I did a tour on my old 10-speed back in late 1970's and managed just fine.

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Old 04-14-15, 07:24 AM
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J, Your Peugeot isn't too different from my RRA I used years ago. Not ideally spec'd, but capable of 20-25 lb. on a rear rack.



It has 52-42T chain rings and a 14-34T 5S freewheel. The frame was a bit flexible even without a load and using a handle bar bag would have helped distribute the weight and perhaps help with the frame flex. I never packed a camping load.

All in all I had a good time and learned a lot.

Brad
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Old 04-14-15, 07:25 AM
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My bike is pretty much like yours, perhaps a little older. One thing that you might want to consider is heel clearance, i.e. will your heels hit your panniers while pedaling? Some of these bikes can be a little short, so pay attention when you buy your rear rack and panniers. The only thing that I upgraded on my bike was the crank... I went to a triple. In your case you may need a new front derailleur to match a triple crank if you decide to go that way. Otherwise the bike is fine.
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Old 04-14-15, 07:38 AM
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Thanks , I am ok for heel clearance , tried it out with my cheap rack and panniers . I was thinking of going with a low rider front rack , would that help with flex /balance ?
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Old 04-14-15, 07:40 AM
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You could definitely update that old bike like you want. I would buy a new longer BB spindle and new loose balls and repack the BB when you change the crank. It might be new enough that you can use a standard shimano cartridge BB but I can't say for sure. New french-threaded BBs are also available. A mountain triple will work and you could probably get away with using a shorter BB than usually recommended, just as long as the crank arms clear the frame. You might want to fit a new derailleur on to handle the increase in gear range, a shimano acera or similar will work for a good while if you don't abuse it. You'd need a new RD if you put a "mega range" freewheel on, according to shimano's spec sheet.

I would also buy new tektro dual-pivot brakes like those or a similar model that have the reach needed for your bike, I can't say that the specific brake I linked to will work for you or not, you can measure how far it is from the mounting bolt to the centre of the pad to see what reach you need. Tektro makes a few different level of brakes but even the basic ones work really well, especially if you put kool-stop pads in.

There are many rack options that don't need all the braze-ons a touring bike usually has, and they aren't needed if you are travelling light and only for a few days. I just ordered a large saddle bag that should hold my clothes and stuff for a weekend trip without having to use any racks since it just straps to the saddle. Combined with a front handlebar bag you can usually do weekend trips pretty easily without racks and panniers.
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Old 04-14-15, 08:59 AM
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Some of the older french bikes do not have the same thread pattern for things like bottom bracket as current bikes. Handlebars, stem, they could also be different. Be forewarned if you start changing parts that you might suddenly discover some weird issue. More here:
French Bicycles
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Old 04-14-15, 09:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN
Some of the older french bikes do not have the same thread pattern for things like bottom bracket as current bikes. Handlebars, stem, they could also be different. Be forewarned if you start changing parts that you might suddenly discover some weird issue. More here:
French Bicycles
Yep! You make a excellent point. My old Paris Sport which is now a fixie has French threaded BB. If your looking for a new one, here's a good one.
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Old 04-14-15, 09:26 AM
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Nice bike and looks suitable for touring. I'd do this as inexpensively as possible. If the wheels are reasonably true, I'd keep them. They look to be weinmann concave rims (hard to tell from the pic); those are strong rims. Do you have 27 inch wheels? Ideally you'd like clearance for a good tire and fenders and it looks like you do.

So change out the crank (you'll have to figure out the threading on the bottom bracket) and get a new front and rear derailleur. You don't need to buy super expensive derailleurs; many of the lower end shimano derailleurs are quite good.

You'll need to replace the chain and you probably should replace the freewheel. Shimano makes some wide ranging 7 speed freewheels that would be ideal for touring. I'd replace all the cables, overhaul the headset and hubs, and get better quality brake shoes (kool stop makes some good ones). You may (or may not) want to change out the saddle.

As to your question in post no. 7, a low rider will help a lot both by taking some weight off the rear wheel and improving the handling of the bike under a load.
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Old 04-14-15, 09:42 AM
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Add a way to carry your stuff and Go .. If you put on platform pedals you can wear walkable shoes , then when low gear is not low enough, use the 2 feet gear.
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Old 04-14-15, 09:55 AM
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Originally Posted by bikemig
Nice bike and looks suitable for touring. I'd do this as inexpensively as possible. If the wheels are reasonably true, I'd keep them. They look to be weinmann concave rims (hard to tell from the pic); those are strong rims. Do you have 27 inch wheels? Ideally you'd like clearance for a good tire and fenders and it looks like you do.

So change out the crank (you'll have to figure out the threading on the bottom bracket) and get a new front and rear derailleur. You don't need to buy super expensive derailleurs; many of the lower end shimano derailleurs are quite good.

You'll need to replace the chain and you probably should replace the freewheel. Shimano makes some wide ranging 7 speed freewheels that would be ideal for touring. I'd replace all the cables, overhaul the headset and hubs, and get better quality brake shoes (kool stop makes some good ones). You may (or may not) want to change out the saddle.

As to your question in post no. 7, a low rider will help a lot both by taking some weight off the rear wheel and improving the handling of the bike under a load.
I have a spare front deraileur that will work with a triple and Ill be keeping a 5 speed freewheel at the back except the largest cog will go up from a 24 tooth to a 28 . So will I really need a new RD?

Also the chain on the bike now is a new sram chain compatible with 5 6 7 8 speed so would I need a new chain or is it good ?Should have mentioned that the cables , bearings , pads and chain are fresh and the bike is riding great .

I have a Brooks B17 for it .
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Old 04-14-15, 10:02 AM
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Originally Posted by jambon
I have a spare front deraileur that will work with a triple and Ill be keeping a 5 speed freewheel at the back except the largest cog will go up from a 24 tooth to a 28 . So will I really need a new RD?

Also the chain on the bike now is a new sram chain compatible with 5 6 7 8 speed so would I need a new chain or is it good ?Should have mentioned that the cables , bearings , pads and chain are fresh and the bike is riding great .

I have a Brooks B17 for it .
You might need a new rear derailleur; it depends on the capacity of the RD, Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Glossary Ca--Ce

Insofar as the freewheel is concerned, a lot depends on whether your rear wheel is 120 mm or 126. I suspect it's the latter in which case you can run a 6 or 7 on the back. You're better off with 7 as you will have better gear ratios.

The problem with the chain is that it was not cut for your new set up and will be too short once you install a wider freewheel and a triple.

The brooks b17 is a great saddle and will look very sharp on the bike.
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Old 04-14-15, 10:36 AM
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Pretty bike, I would like to have one like it myself.

I did much the same thing on my first tour, except mine was a Motobecane. All I did was put a 32 tooth freewheel on mine(the suntour vgt derailleur handled it no problem).
Mine had the French threads, I would have tried to get a triple on it, but the shops all told me nothing was made to fit at all(now I know they were wrong). Instead what I did was find a triple, and made it into a compact double by moving the rings around, so I had a 28-42. Probably dropped the chain twice before I got the hang of shifting that big a jump with an inadequate derailleur.

I had no real problems with the original brakes, and I have toured on single pivot brakes on other bikes. Then, one day I decided to buy some dual pivots, and it made a huge difference in my traveling as I had more confidence going down hills, so could go faster. Dual pivots are among the few modern things that I like. Remember, its better to be able to stop going down hill in a hurry than it is to get to the top of the hill in a hurry.

Check this out. https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/..._id=88592&v=6V
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Old 04-14-15, 10:40 AM
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Thanks shipwreck and bike the advice , another question , if the RD cant hack the increae in freewheel size then how will I know ? Will the jockey wheels hit the cogs ?
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Old 04-14-15, 10:40 AM
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Cant get that link Shipwreck
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Old 04-14-15, 12:38 PM
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Originally Posted by jambon
..if the RD cant hack the increae in freewheel size then how will I know ? Will the jockey wheels hit the cogs ?
You will know if it does not behave right. Put it on and try it to see how it works. Any funny noises, that is an immediate clue that something is wrong.

On the older bikes with 5 or 6 speed non-indexed gearing, I liked Suntour long cage derailleurs. Occasionally they are cheap on Ebay. I do not know if they work on french dropouts however. Decades ago when I worked at a bike shop, most of the mechanics had Suntour rear derailleur, Huret Luxe front. I was one of the exceptions, I had a Suntour front instead of the Huret.

If this is a freewheel bike, keep the weight in the back low so you do not bend or break an axle. If it was me and carrying a full load of camping gear, I would be tempted to carry a spare axle and cone wrenches, and maybe a spare set of ball bearings. But I used to bend axles on some of the cheaper brit ten speed bikes, so I would be justifiably nervous about that. If you have a higher quality axle, maybe it will hold up just fine?
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Old 04-14-15, 01:19 PM
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put a rear rack on. shouldn't be too much of a problem with those dropouts and a brake-hole mount. then a pair of front panniers on that rear rack. you're most of the way there. 1 and 1/8" tires and the smallest chainring and biggest cassette/freewheel that your derailleur will handle, and you're there. have fun.
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Old 04-14-15, 03:02 PM
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If everything is working OK, put on the 28 tooth freewheel, and give it a go. Keep your gear relatively light, and it should do a good job for you.

It looks like you still have the original Simplex rear derailleur. If in doubt about the condition, the suggestion of a Suntour rear derailleur is a good idea. I believe that my wife's late 1970's UO8 came with a ST RD. However, I'm not sure of that. That was a while ago, and at my age you just never know

Peugeot PX10- This bike was used for several tours.


See if you can find one of the older racks similar to this Backburn. It is a pretty sturdy mount. This was on a Gitane a bike very similar to the UO8.

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Old 05-08-15, 09:47 PM
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@Doug64 - I found your bike



Feel free to ignore the color scheme, I hate it too.
Things I changed on my Peugeot:
700cc wheels with 6sp shimano UG freewheel
Suntour Bar End Shifters
Suntour Front and Rear Deraileur //fitting the rear Derailleur requires grinding the back of the hanger flat
suntour aero levers
an aluminum stem ground to fit the smaller french diameter steerer tube
SR aluminum seat post
kool stop brake pads
and a generic rack held on with p-clamps which works very well also, but you do need to be careful of your heels hitting the panniers as someone else already pointed out. I've also broken two quick release rear axles so swapping for a solid axle is probably a good idea.
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Old 05-09-15, 05:29 AM
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Originally Posted by jamminB
... I've also broken two quick release rear axles so swapping for a solid axle is probably a good idea.
A friend of mine tours with a Phil freewheel type hub, pricey but stronger. A solid axle is not much stronger than one that takes skewers, but it is not any worse. Considering how rare you actually have to remove a wheel, there is no real downside to the solid rear axle.
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