Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Weight differences in handlebars/stems/shifters Steel VS Carbon VS Aluminium

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Weight differences in handlebars/stems/shifters Steel VS Carbon VS Aluminium

Old 04-25-15, 01:21 AM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
azza_333's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 793

Bikes: A few

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 122 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Weight differences in handlebars/stems/shifters Steel VS Carbon VS Aluminium

I currently have a 2015 Kona Sutra, I know the frame is steel, and it currently has bar end shifters, below are the compenents I am thinking about changing, also the whole thing comes in at 14kg. I am trying to find out how much weight I will save swaping to Carbon Stem & Handle Bars, possibley sti shifters if I can find a 3 X 9 speed set.


Shifters: Shimano BarCon (pair 200g I think)
I have been thinking about swapping to STI shifters but I think they are over 400g a pair for STI shifters

Handlebar: Kona Wet Bar (unsure of weight)
I dont know how much these weigh or even what they are made of does anyone know? and more importantly how much it weighs?

Stem: Kona XC/Road (unsure of weight)
I dont know how much these weigh or even what they are made of does anyone know? and more importantly how much it weighs?

I am also thinking about swapping my seat post for a carbon one

Last edited by azza_333; 04-25-15 at 01:39 AM. Reason: Edit
azza_333 is offline  
Old 04-25-15, 02:55 AM
  #2  
imi
aka Timi
 
imi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Posts: 3,238

Bikes: Bianchi Lupo (touring) Bianchi Volpe (commuter), Miyata On Off Road Runner

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 160 Post(s)
Liked 129 Times in 99 Posts
Weight differences in handlebars/stems/shifters Steel VS Carbon VS Aluminium

If the weight saved is worth the investment, go for it. Personally it wouldn't be for me. It's the combined weight of bike, rider and gear that has to be moved, and I feel there are other areas than handlebars, stems and seatposts where more significant weight might be saved.

The rolling resistance of wheels and tires plays a part as well, though I prefer "bombproof" over minor weight savings.

On the road after stocking up on food, fuel and water, thinking about the saving of a couple of hundred grammes (basically one banana more or less) here or there seems pretty irrelevant, but hey ymmv

Last edited by imi; 04-25-15 at 02:58 AM.
imi is offline  
Old 04-25-15, 03:22 AM
  #3  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
azza_333's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 793

Bikes: A few

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 122 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by imi
If the weight saved is worth the investment, go for it. Personally it wouldn't be for me. It's the combined weight of bike, rider and gear that has to be moved, and I feel there are other areas than handlebars, stems and seatposts where more significant weight might be saved.

The rolling resistance of wheels and tires plays a part as well, though I prefer "bombproof" over minor weight savings.

On the road after stocking up on food, fuel and water, thinking about the saving of a couple of hundred grammes (basically one banana more or less) here or there seems pretty irrelevant, but hey ymmv
I can see your point about only making a small weight saving relative to all the gear and the rider, but 95% of my time I spend on the bike is commuting or riding with my local group of roadies, so for me its worth considering. I am just trying to find out how much weight I will save with each component to decide if its worth it
azza_333 is offline  
Old 04-25-15, 03:51 AM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Pearland, Texas
Posts: 7,579

Bikes: Cannondale, Trek, Raleigh, Santana

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 308 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
azza_333, The weight savings on a 14 kg bike is probably going to be minimal, perhaps imperceptible in use. If you are also attempting to improve fitment, then the weight savings can be seen as a small bonus.

Brad
bradtx is offline  
Old 04-25-15, 04:30 AM
  #5  
imi
aka Timi
 
imi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Posts: 3,238

Bikes: Bianchi Lupo (touring) Bianchi Volpe (commuter), Miyata On Off Road Runner

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 160 Post(s)
Liked 129 Times in 99 Posts
Originally Posted by azza_333
95% of my time I spend on the bike is commuting or riding with my local group of roadies...
Sounds like a good excuse to go "n+1", a bombproof touring bike and a weight-weeny road bike
imi is offline  
Old 04-25-15, 04:30 AM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 318
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by azza_333
I can see your point about only making a small weight saving relative to all the gear and the rider, but 95% of my time I spend on the bike is commuting or riding with my local group of roadies, so for me its worth considering. I am just trying to find out how much weight I will save with each component to decide if its worth it
[h=3]You can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear[/h]What type of touring do you have in mind? If you're planning around full loaded touring, You should keep your 2015 Kona Sutra, and forget riding with your rodies. If your touring will be around light touring, SAG, or credit card touring, then get a new bike, which you'll be competitive with your friends. BTW Are you currently riding with local roadies? If so, retain that bike, and use your 2015 Kona Sutra strictly for touring.
wheelinthai is offline  
Old 04-25-15, 05:53 AM
  #7  
 
BigAura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Chapin, SC
Posts: 3,423

Bikes: all steel stable: surly world troller, paris sport fixed, fuji ss

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 623 Post(s)
Liked 55 Times in 33 Posts
Originally Posted by imi
Sounds like a good excuse to go "n+1", a bombproof touring bike and a weight-weeny road bike
+1 to n+1.

You'd be best off having two bikes. A do-all bike is always a compromise, which will be lacking in one way or another, no matter what you're using it for. Besides spending a good bit on parts upgrades, there's a big hassle in swapping parts for the different modes.
BigAura is offline  
Old 04-25-15, 06:11 AM
  #8  
nun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,670

Bikes: Rivendell Quickbeam, Rivendell Rambouillet, Rivendell Atlantis, Circle A town bike, De Rosa Neo Primato, Cervelo RS, Specialized Diverge

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 180 Post(s)
Liked 43 Times in 40 Posts
To lighten a bike start with the heaviest components first.....that's probably the wheels...... why would you start with the handlebars? Even many professionals don't trust carbon bars and stick to aluminium. IMHO if you want a lighter bike than the Kona Sutra get another bike.
nun is offline  
Old 04-25-15, 09:16 AM
  #9  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,355 Times in 862 Posts
Why worry about weight shaving on a touring bike .. unless you bring a lot of Money so wont need to camp at all ..
fietsbob is offline  
Old 04-25-15, 06:04 PM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 318
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
May not pertain to your requirements, but I've just got a new fairly light gravel aluminum bike that can be used for light touring GT Grade Alloy 105 review - BikeRadar You can easily put a rear rack on it, and I can tag along happily with rodie friends.

Yet for serious road work, I'm pressed to go on my Storck.
wheelinthai is offline  
Old 04-25-15, 06:50 PM
  #11  
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 13,467

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Salsa Timberjack Ti, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Phil Wood Apple VeloXS Frame (w/DA 7400), R+M Supercharger2 Rohloff, Habanero Ti 26

Mentioned: 54 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4335 Post(s)
Liked 3,958 Times in 2,646 Posts
The number of bikes one should have is the number of bikes you currently have plus one. Trying to have one bike that can do it really really well is hard. You can get a bike that will do some thing exceptionally well and will either weigh a bit much or too little or not be strong enough for other things.

Stick with bar end shifters or if you need brifters go with Genvalle which use bar end or down tube shifters on the front a brake levers. Probably keep the bars unless you are going for a more ergonomic route and only change the stem if you need to fit different diameter bars. If you need a decently light seatpost Thomson makes great ones that are super high quality and not so heavy but honestly it probably won't be a huge difference unless you don't have a two bolt post (which is great for micro adjustability).

I would rather have a stronger bike for touring and maybe be a little slower unloaded than get super weight weenie and not have a reliable tourer.
veganbikes is offline  
Old 04-26-15, 02:18 PM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
gregjones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: West Georgia
Posts: 2,828

Bikes: K2 Mod 5.0 Roadie, Fuji Commuter

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Only fill your water bottle up half way.

Twice the weight savings of that obtainable with bar/stem changes.
gregjones is offline  
Old 04-27-15, 11:43 PM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Anchorage
Posts: 226

Bikes: Devinci Oslo

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
There might be some in the cassette, chain and chain wheels.
Cheers,
David in Alaska
md11mx is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
donheff
Fifty Plus (50+)
43
10-04-17 12:36 PM
azza_333
General Cycling Discussion
12
04-25-15 10:06 PM
bikenh
Bicycle Mechanics
38
03-08-12 12:59 PM
BLR_0719
Road Cycling
38
08-17-10 10:36 PM
chinarider
Road Cycling
9
03-14-10 08:15 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.