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Super cheap(I mean spit poor) camping france

Old 04-25-15, 03:32 AM
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Super cheap(I mean spit poor) camping france

Hi, so I'm a noob, Obviously. So hi all, I hope everyone is well and fantastic. I was just wondering if there was anyone out there who would be able to give me some advice. No matter how great or small, experience is always appreciated. I am a cyclist by no means but I have always used my bicycle to get me to most places I have wanted to go. I would like to make it down the entire length of France into Spain. My only Problem is budget, time is not an issue. But I do have to camp on the cheap. My french is very limited to about 10 words. I do not want to disrespect or cause any hassle for anyone. I have a lot of experience living out doors but not in France. This will also be my first visit ever to France so all i want is good vibes and to leave good vibes. If ya get me.

Thank you for taking the time to read this, any help at all will be greatly appreciated.
respect
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Old 04-25-15, 03:42 AM
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LeCampingSauvage.fr | Législation et réglementation en France, renseignements, bonnes pratiques

This seems to say it's legal to pitch a tent overnight, as long as you don't bother anyone and ask nicely if there's an obvious person you can ask. (I've stealth camped with my hammock in countries where it's not legal and never had any trouble.)

I can highly recommend combining stealth camping with couch surfing, had a great time doing that and it was extremely cheap
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Old 04-25-15, 04:39 AM
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Super cheap(I mean spit poor) camping france

"Camping a la ferme)" (Farmyard camping, look for an often handwritten sign in the country) or "Camping Municipale" in or near towns are often the cheapest.. oh and stay clear of the main cities and the mediterranean coast. The campsites along major tourist routes like the Loire Valley have become much more expensive as well.
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Old 04-25-15, 09:03 AM
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Wild camping in France is pretty much illegal (there are some places where it's allowed, but you really have to know the area). I wouldn't try it if your French is too limited to ask for permission or advice from the locals. Get a Michelin camping guide and look for 1 and 2 star campgrounds to camp cheaply. If you want to stay in a B&B, look for a "gite" or "chambre d'hôte". Finally, if you want a very cheap hotel (think Motel 6, then downgrade it), look for a "Formula 1". The rooms are small, smelly, and you share a bathroom with other people on your floor, but you get a solid roof over your head for about 25 euros/night. May be worth it if you find yourself caught out in a storm.
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Old 04-25-15, 09:12 AM
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I camped in Italy.

The municipal locations always seemed expensive. So... I'd always find a good camping place along the road at dusk, and be up at dawn. No fire, No stove, and no trash. The only sign that I was ever there was a bit of matted grass where the tent was. I think for the most part, nobody ever knew I was there. I always carried stuff for cold meals like sandwich materials.

I think there are fewer fences in Italy than there are in the USA.

Also if you are in your teens or twenties (older?) get tied into the youth hostile network. It is a good place for those occasional days when a bed and shower is nice.

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Old 04-25-15, 03:47 PM
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The French have a great network on municipal camp grounds. In most cases they are quite cheap, tidy and have hot showers. You are very rarely more than a reasonable days ride between camp grounds. Here is a link to a pretty good guide:
CAMPINGS MUNICIPAUX FRANCE I Retrouvez les Campings Municipaux en France sur cartes
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Old 04-25-15, 05:31 PM
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https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/...c_id=2282&v=DL

An experienced cycle tourist's advice on touring in France.
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Old 04-25-15, 10:18 PM
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Originally Posted by jeffpoulin
Finally, if you want a very cheap hotel (think Motel 6, then downgrade it), look for a "Formula 1". The rooms are small, smelly, and you share a bathroom with other people on your floor, but you get a solid roof over your head for about 25 euros/night. May be worth it if you find yourself caught out in a storm.
I first stayed in a F1 hotel in 1992 I think, and two summers ago I stayed in them too, still good value for what you get--a bed, a sink, and a shower and bathroom down the hall. They also have about a 5 euro bereakfast that is ok too.
I have also camped in simple municipal campgrounds, the real cheap ones, but it has been many years so Idont know what the prices are now. About 6 years ago I camped in a more typical campground where French people go for vacation (pool, evening activities etc) and it was more like 25 euros a night, but we were two families so it was ok.
In any case, the main thing is that there are lots of campgrounds around, and the suggestion to look up the small municipal ones is probably the best for you.

when I went to France for the first time in 92, I stayed nearly the whole trip (Normandy, Bretagne) in municipal campgrounds, with a few more expensive ones where more tourists go, but all in all it makes an inexpensive way to travel. Of course, buying your own food and cooking your own suppers etc makes it a lot cheaper too, and thats easy with towns nearby to each other, and especially nowadays where there are larger grocery stores that are open more than 20 odd years ago.(not closed at lunch time etc)
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Old 04-26-15, 04:09 AM
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I've cycled/camped in France for forty-odd years and lived in that country also.
The basic and cheap camping you require is not likely to be found in the Michelin Guide but in a reference that lists all of the most basic sites of which there are thousands. The best and most comprehensive of these is "The Guide Officiel Camping Caravanning" which can be bought in most Bookshops and Supermarkets in France. It can also be bought from the UK' "Caravan Club"and "Camping and Caravanning Club" shops.

The Guide is in French but easily understood using the symbols.
Be advised that all property in France is owned and they do not take kindly to people camping on their land. Do try to learn some basic French even if this is only greetings as the French do tend to be formal about this. I would suggest that the Michel Thomas method would be the most efficient way to do this.

Learn French - Learn to Speak French with The Michel Thomas Method
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Old 04-26-15, 06:03 AM
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I took French for three years and still couldn't understand a National speaking it. If you don't learn some prerequisites before you go, make sure to take a translation guide or a smartphone with 'translate' on it. It's really not unusual to run into English speakers there...the trick is getting them to tell you they know it. French folks often don't like Americans and tend to be rude in some situations where it is obvious you don't know the language and culture.
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Old 04-26-15, 07:35 AM
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Originally Posted by punkncat
I took French for three years and still couldn't understand a National speaking it. If you don't learn some prerequisites before you go, make sure to take a translation guide or a smartphone with 'translate' on it. It's really not unusual to run into English speakers there...the trick is getting them to tell you they know it. French folks often don't like Americans and tend to be rude in some situations where it is obvious you don't know the language and culture.
I think what offends the French the most is if an American won't even try to speak a little french. That's when you find they don't admit to knowing any english. So you're better off stumbling over the correct french than to start in with a stranger with pure english, hopping they understand you.
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Old 04-26-15, 09:12 AM
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Little to No Money? air fare and bike handling charges are not Donated.

you already on the continent?
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Old 04-26-15, 09:27 AM
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I have a little schoolboy french, ( raised in england live in america ) and must sound like a five year old to
french people.
Greeting in french is very important to french people when entering a store or engaging an assistant, or really any encounter.
If they speak english they'll speak it after you've murdered french pronunciation if they speak it better than you speak french.
In some rural areas no one speaks english so a phrasebook and gestures will help.
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Old 04-28-15, 01:18 PM
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Hi there, have only just joined the site, so a bit unfamiliar with the settings. It depends where you are comeing from but the best way to get to Spain is on the euro velo Atlantic route down the west coast . I cycled from central Brittany to Irun Spain last year my, first cycle tour , only 65 !!. It is for the best part very flat. I kept a list of the cheap campsites (sometimes the best !!) along the route, once past Bordeaux best to go inland a bit, sites are a bit pricey along the coast., with a little bit more time I will do a list if you are interested.
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Old 04-28-15, 02:26 PM
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Your first trip Mr green, good for you! It's great that so many camping options can for relatively cheap vacations like this (after the air fare of course)
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Old 05-06-15, 07:25 PM
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Originally Posted by punkncat
I took French for three years and still couldn't understand a National speaking it. If you don't learn some prerequisites before you go, make sure to take a translation guide or a smartphone with 'translate' on it. It's really not unusual to run into English speakers there...the trick is getting them to tell you they know it. French folks often don't like Americans and tend to be rude in some situations where it is obvious you don't know the language and culture.
My limited experience from 10 weeks cycling in the French countryside last fall, plus some advice from American expats in France, is that the French assume that anyone who speaks English or has an obvious English accent when attempting French is British, not American or Canadian. Many French people are sick of British tourists who abound in France and don't bother to attempt to speak French. Outside of Paris, Americans, particularly those not on organized tours, are more of a curiosity and receive the benefit of the doubt. Learn to say "Bonjour madame/monsieur! Je suis désolé(é) mais je ne parle pas francais--je suis américain(e)."

As for cheap places to camp, the municipal campgrounds are the cheapest and best located and some are really very nice. There are also many many warmshowers hosts all over France, but not a one of them will be home in August. Finally, a french cyclist told me wild camping is legal everywhere in france if you only stay one night. Prenez cela avec un grain de sel.
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