Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Disc Brakes my thoughts

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Disc Brakes my thoughts

Old 04-27-15, 06:26 PM
  #26  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 3,473
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 363 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 23 Posts
Brake threads are always so interesting. I think they're my favorite for "Wtf? Everyone has Such different results with the Same product" discussions. My friend, who does his own bike work just fine, can't ever seem to adjust his disk brakes well. They'll be rubbing or squealing when he's done. He has problems with them every time, and then I can come over and fix them up in a short time. I've never had a problem with my BB7s. I have them on a MTB and I've hardly touched them in a couple years of MTBing, including taking wheels off plenty of times. They're quiet and don't rub. And I can't imagine another mechanical brake that will so easily throw you over the bars, yet they have plenty of power range before it gets to that point. For me, it's cantilevers that I can't seem to get good performance out of. I have some Tektro CR720s that I've read tons of good reviews on, but I just can't seem to get a lot of performance out of them. I've read multiple articles on how to set up cantilevers, with no luck. They'll stop the bike OK, but not great, and it takes a lot of hand force. This is with a good cable routing to the front brake and high end cable and housing. I guess the universe just wants to troll everyone when it comes to brakes and watch us debate it.
3speed is offline  
Old 04-27-15, 06:51 PM
  #27  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 410
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm more confused about brakes than I was before I read this thread. V-brakes on my current cheap Schwinn work great. I want a better bike but don't want brake hassles. Disc brakes look cool and in theory should be better than rim brakes but there's not a majority saying how great they are here.
DBrown9383 is offline  
Old 04-27-15, 08:33 PM
  #28  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: North Texas
Posts: 277

Bikes: Surly Disc Trucker, Ogre, Steamroller

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Mr IGH
LOL, best mechanic in north Texas can't adjust BB7 but this Yankee has no less than seven different bikes with BB7s working just fine (including my kids MTBs). Too funny! Really, take the time to watch a few youtube videos before all of Texas hangs their collective heads in shame for you and your mechanic....
I think you misunderstand what I'm saying. They will be set up great, Then I'll take it out and ride it 20 or 30 miles, put it in the rack, spin the wheel and it will need adjusting. (usually will be rubbing slightly) As I've said they feel weak to me, so I'm hesitant to open the pads up any more than I have to. If I wanted to I could open them up more, no big deal, but that would make them even weaker.

By the way, I see no need to be a jerk. Maybe you could keep your sarcasm to your self.
jargo432 is offline  
Old 04-27-15, 10:24 PM
  #29  
Anywhere I roam
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Rockies, U.S.A.
Posts: 261

Bikes: Three blind bikes

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by 3speed
Brake threads are always so interesting. I think they're my favorite for "Wtf? Everyone has Such different results with the Same product" discussions. My friend, who does his own bike work just fine, can't ever seem to adjust his disk brakes well. They'll be rubbing or squealing when he's done. He has problems with them every time, and then I can come over and fix them up in a short time. I've never had a problem with my BB7s. I have them on a MTB and I've hardly touched them in a couple years of MTBing, including taking wheels off plenty of times. They're quiet and don't rub. And I can't imagine another mechanical brake that will so easily throw you over the bars, yet they have plenty of power range before it gets to that point. For me, it's cantilevers that I can't seem to get good performance out of. I have some Tektro CR720s that I've read tons of good reviews on, but I just can't seem to get a lot of performance out of them. I've read multiple articles on how to set up cantilevers, with no luck. They'll stop the bike OK, but not great, and it takes a lot of hand force. This is with a good cable routing to the front brake and high end cable and housing. I guess the universe just wants to troll everyone when it comes to brakes and watch us debate it.
And my V brakes feel as good as any hydraulics I've ever felt. Funny huh?
Wolf Dust is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 02:22 AM
  #30  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 16,771
Mentioned: 125 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1454 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 40 Posts
Originally Posted by Mr IGH
This isn't true, a quick measurement with calipers would show you the error. BB7 discs are the same thickness or thicker/heavier compared to other Avid rotors. Rotors get bent in shipping and BB7s suck?
I should have been clearer. Avid discs are made to price and are more prone to bending than other better quality discs, according to my friend.
Rowan is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 02:28 AM
  #31  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 16,771
Mentioned: 125 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1454 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 40 Posts
Originally Posted by jargo432
I think you misunderstand what I'm saying. They will be set up great, Then I'll take it out and ride it 20 or 30 miles, put it in the rack, spin the wheel and it will need adjusting. (usually will be rubbing slightly) As I've said they feel weak to me, so I'm hesitant to open the pads up any more than I have to. If I wanted to I could open them up more, no big deal, but that would make them even weaker.

By the way, I see no need to be a jerk. Maybe you could keep your sarcasm to your self.
I can't help but feel there is a problem with lever pull which is giving you a weak brake. When experimenting with mine on a Bike Friday, I found that creating greater cable slack in order to get the pads wide enough apart to avoid rubbing, there was a decrease in power. However, by turning the inner adjuster on the brake calliper as a starting point, I was then able to take the slack up in the cable and improve power considerably.

Oddly, on my MTB, I've never had an issue with adjusting the same type of cable-actuated disc brakes.

I think the mechanical advantage thing is what counts here. Sheldon Brown's website has a discussion on mechanical advantage and it applies as much to disc brakes, I believe, as it does to cantis and calipers.

Last edited by Rowan; 04-28-15 at 02:32 AM.
Rowan is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 02:35 AM
  #32  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 16,771
Mentioned: 125 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1454 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 40 Posts
Finally, discussion on what brakes perform better than others all depends on the previous type of brakes that were used by a poster. For example, a brilliantly adjusted canti set-up would be a great performer in comparison with a badly set-up disc system... and vice versa.
Rowan is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 04:37 AM
  #33  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: North Texas
Posts: 277

Bikes: Surly Disc Trucker, Ogre, Steamroller

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Rowan
I can't help but feel there is a problem with lever pull which is giving you a weak brake. When experimenting with mine on a Bike Friday, I found that creating greater cable slack in order to get the pads wide enough apart to avoid rubbing, there was a decrease in power. However, by turning the inner adjuster on the brake calliper as a starting point, I was then able to take the slack up in the cable and improve power considerably.

Oddly, on my MTB, I've never had an issue with adjusting the same type of cable-actuated disc brakes.

I think the mechanical advantage thing is what counts here. Sheldon Brown's website has a discussion on mechanical advantage and it applies as much to disc brakes, I believe, as it does to cantis and calipers.
I see what your saying and your right. Since one of the adjusters will take up slack in the cable and the other one doesn't, The trick is to set up the one that doesn't to the right setting before you loosen the bolts and align the entire brake set. That way when you set the other one it will take any slack out.

Some times I wonder if one of the differences people find come from the brake levers themselves. I assume that all brake levers are the same ratio. But it's not something I ever researched.
jargo432 is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 06:10 AM
  #34  
imi
aka Timi
 
imi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Posts: 3,272

Bikes: Bianchi Lupo (touring) Bianchi Volpe (commuter), Miyata On Off Road Runner

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 173 Post(s)
Liked 140 Times in 106 Posts
Disc Brakes my thoughts

I'm a bit of a retro grouch, though I moved up from longarm calipers to V-brakes (avid single digit 7 with dual compound Kool-Stops.
I love the ease of adjustability, as even a tiny tiny amount of rub drives me keeraazee
imi is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 06:24 AM
  #35  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: North Texas
Posts: 277

Bikes: Surly Disc Trucker, Ogre, Steamroller

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
When I bought my BB7s I noticed that the caliper that I put on the rear was a lighter shade of paint than the one I put on the front. In a way it looked like maybe it was an older generation or something. I just figured no big deal. I quickly realized the one on the front worked great and I had no problems, however the same has not been true for the rear. So I did a little digging and realized something. The Torx used for adjustments on the rear is a T20 while the Torx used for the front is a T25. I'm starting to think maybe I've got an older model of BB7 or something. Has anyone ever seen this before?
jargo432 is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 06:26 AM
  #36  
afraid of whales
 
Mr IGH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Front Range, CO
Posts: 4,306
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 347 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by jargo432
I think you misunderstand what I'm saying. They will be set up great, Then I'll take it out and ride it 20 or 30 miles, put it in the rack, spin the wheel and it will need adjusting. (usually will be rubbing slightly) As I've said they feel weak to me, so I'm hesitant to open the pads up any more than I have to. If I wanted to I could open them up more, no big deal, but that would make them even weaker.

By the way, I see no need to be a jerk. Maybe you could keep your sarcasm to your self.
Again, watch a few youtube videos, you're not setting them up correctly. The fact that you have weak braking is proof the calipers are not aligned correctly. You own the bb7s, why not take the time to set them up correctly?
As for rotor thickness, my bb7 rotors are the same thickness as my Shimano rotors. Not sure just what the best mechanic in north Texas is claiming, but maybe you should try someone else. It's not rocket science, it's a bike
Mr IGH is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 06:55 AM
  #37  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 13,251
Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2750 Post(s)
Liked 979 Times in 801 Posts
it's interesting to read stuff from this thread. I have considered BB7s for a future bike that would be used where conditions would suit discs, and have read numerous trip journals of folks having very satisfactory performance and pad life from BB7s. I don't recall the numbers, but the "Hugh and Pauline" trip journals on Cgoab have had them go a long long way on a set of pads (10-15,000 km?)

I would really only consider discs if I knew I would be riding on dirt gravel combined with rain as I see this as where the advantage is really there. I've ridden a lot with cantis and with cantis loaded in mtnous areas and they work pretty good, and for the vast majority of my riding (not fully loaded) rim brakes with good pads and keeping pads and rims cleaned works very very well.
All that said, I would still go the BB7 route (or other if "other" has a good reputation with folks using them a lot) mechanical discs.

I figure the whole set up thing is just getting to learn a new set of wrenching techniques, as numerous people have had no issues with BB7s.
djb is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 07:30 AM
  #38  
Senior Member
 
alan s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 6,977
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1496 Post(s)
Liked 189 Times in 128 Posts
I've used every type of brake there is, all properly set up, of course. Hands down, Shimano hydraulics are the best. Literally, you change pads when they wear out, and force the pistons open with a cone wrench or any other flat piece of metal. 5 minute job tops. No bleeding, no changing mineral oil, no rubbing and no adjusting. And the brakes provide excellent stopping power in all conditions. The latest Freeza rotors and finned pads shed heat on the road hydraulics, so no overheating whatsoever.
alan s is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 11:58 AM
  #39  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 3,473
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 363 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 23 Posts
Originally Posted by Mr IGH
The fact that you have weak braking is proof the calipers are not aligned correctly.
I don't know if it's caliper alignment, but I must say it does show that something isn't right. BB7s stop hard without even having to squeeze the lever too hard. There are Many Many people to back that up. That's why they're so popular and well-known. I can't say what it is without seeing the set-up, but something is off if BB7s have weak braking. And as I said, I've never had problems with mine going out of adjustment. That's even on a MTB that gets ridden hard off-road.

Start with the inner pad fairly far in towards the rotor, squeeze the brake lever tight, then tighten the bolts that hold the brake caliper to the bike. That will get the caliper aligned well with the rotor. Overall brake adjustment whis method doesn't take very long since you tighten the brake caliper to the bike with the brake applied. It's almost in the perfect position from the start. Then just move the pads slightly in or out to eliminate scrubbing. As long as you have good cables and housing, you should be stopping on a dime. I have BB7s and a friend has them on two bikes. We both love them and have awesome braking with no problems(minus him not being very good at setting them up, even though it's easy...).
3speed is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 12:39 PM
  #40  
afraid of whales
 
Mr IGH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Front Range, CO
Posts: 4,306
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 347 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by 3speed
Start with the inner pad fairly far in towards the rotor, squeeze the brake lever tight, then tighten the bolts that hold the brake caliper to the bike. That will get the caliper aligned well with the rotor....
A better method is to loosen the caliper mounting bolts, turn the inner pad adjuster all the way out, then one full turn inward, then turn the outer pad adjuster all the way in until the brake is locked up, tighten the caliper mounting bolts. Now the caliper is perfectly alined. Next, turn the inner pad adjuster out 1/2 turn and the outer pad adjuster out until the brake lever is pulling the cable and the pads aren't rubbing. Here's a good video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NasGJFtgq0A
Mr IGH is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 01:04 PM
  #41  
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 546
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
A lot of pros are not so looking forward to the prospect of getting fried and sliced in a 20 bike pileup.

They'll take the risk if they have to, since "the industry" is pushing discs so hard, but the pros are aware of the risks and are trying to voice their concerns in a muted way, although of course their paychecks rely on their keeping their mouths shut.
sam_cyclist is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 08:30 PM
  #42  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 209
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 86 Post(s)
Liked 51 Times in 35 Posts
Originally Posted by sam_cyclist
A lot of pros are not so looking forward to the prospect of getting fried and sliced in a 20 bike pileup.

They'll take the risk if they have to, since "the industry" is pushing discs so hard, but the pros are aware of the risks and are trying to voice their concerns in a muted way, although of course their paychecks rely on their keeping their mouths shut.
Doesn't seem terribly relevant to us recreational and touring riders...?
fourfa is offline  
Old 04-30-15, 02:39 AM
  #43  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 3,473
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 363 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 23 Posts
Originally Posted by Mr IGH
A better method is...
Ooo, that sounds pretty good. I'll try it next time I set some up. Thanks for posting!
3speed is offline  
Old 04-30-15, 08:27 AM
  #44  
Cycle Dallas
 
MMACH 5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Land of Gar, TX
Posts: 3,777

Bikes: Dulcinea--2017 Kona Rove & a few others

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 197 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by jargo432
I'll have to disagree with you. First I set them up myself and realized I didn't know enough to get it right so I took it to one of the best bike mechanics in north Texas. (maybe in the country) This guy has been touring and working as a bike mechanic for 15 years. They are set up as good as possible.
Originally Posted by jargo432
When I bought my BB7s I noticed that the caliper that I put on the rear was a lighter shade of paint than the one I put on the front. In a way it looked like maybe it was an older generation or something. I just figured no big deal. I quickly realized the one on the front worked great and I had no problems, however the same has not been true for the rear. So I did a little digging and realized something. The Torx used for adjustments on the rear is a T20 while the Torx used for the front is a T25. I'm starting to think maybe I've got an older model of BB7 or something. Has anyone ever seen this before?
You're losing credibility, here.
You claim that your buddy is the best bike mechanic for as far as the eye can see.
Somehow, this ace mechanic failed to notice or mention that you bought an unmatched set of brakes?
That's rather suspicious.
MMACH 5 is offline  
Old 04-30-15, 01:51 PM
  #45  
Senior Member
 
mdilthey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,923

Bikes: Nature Boy 853 Disc, Pugsley SS

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 251 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by MMACH 5
You're losing credibility, here.
You claim that your buddy is the best bike mechanic for as far as the eye can see.
Somehow, this ace mechanic failed to notice or mention that you bought an unmatched set of brakes?
That's rather suspicious.
Don't think OP is lying. DO think OP is frustrated.

Here's my FYI with disc brakes:


- Step One: Make sure both of your brakes say "Avid BB7 Road" on them. Mountain brakes have a different pull ratio on the cable. Check that your levers match the pull for the brakes you've got. You can set up a LHT with mountain brakes, as long as the levers match the brakes. One or the other, can't mix.

- Step Two: Make sure you've got good cables and housing. I use stainless steel cables (pennies more than the alternative) and Jagwire Mountain Pro housing. The Jagwire housing won't compress when you squeeze the brake, so you'll get full actuation through the cable. Hence, they call it "compressionless." Worth every penny.

- Step Three: Loosen the mounting bolts completely, so you can fiddle with the position of the brake itself, WHILE the wheel is still on.

- Step Four: Turn both the Torx side and the caliper side all the way down, so the pads are as far from the rotor as they can go.

- Step Five: With the mount nice and loose, squeeze the caliper so the brake pinches the rotor. Push it firmly into the mount and squeeze nice and tight on that lever. While still squeezing the brake tight, tighten up those two bolts.

- Step Six: Now that you've tightened those bolts with the brake lever held down, your brake should be mounted straight. Use a Torx and your fingers to slowly bring the pads in until you have a half millimeter on either side or so. Try fitting a credit card in.

- Step Seven: Rub your rotors down real quick with an alcohol swab. This'll get any grease off em'.


That should do it.
mdilthey is offline  
Old 04-30-15, 01:54 PM
  #46  
Senior Member
 
mdilthey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,923

Bikes: Nature Boy 853 Disc, Pugsley SS

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 251 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by sam_cyclist
A lot of pros are not so looking forward to the prospect of getting fried and sliced in a 20 bike pileup.

They'll take the risk if they have to, since "the industry" is pushing discs so hard, but the pros are aware of the risks and are trying to voice their concerns in a muted way, although of course their paychecks rely on their keeping their mouths shut.
The chainring is far more dangerous and is completely open to contact, since it's between the wheels. How many disc brake slice and dices have you seen in the cyclocross and mountain bike races for the last half-decade or more? Not that many...
mdilthey is offline  
Old 04-30-15, 01:54 PM
  #47  
Cycle Dallas
 
MMACH 5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Land of Gar, TX
Posts: 3,777

Bikes: Dulcinea--2017 Kona Rove & a few others

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 197 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by mdilthey
Don't think OP is lying. DO think OP is frustrated.
...
I don't think OP is lying about having problems with disc brakes. I think OP is giving way too much credit to the bike mechanic, in regard to his abilities.
MMACH 5 is offline  
Old 04-30-15, 02:13 PM
  #48  
Senior Member
 
mdilthey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,923

Bikes: Nature Boy 853 Disc, Pugsley SS

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 251 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by MMACH 5
I don't think OP is lying about having problems with disc brakes. I think OP is giving way too much credit to the bike mechanic, in regard to his abilities.
Maybe spend less time pointing the finger of blame and more time being productive and helpful?

I used to go to a bike mechanic with decades of experience in the US Pro circuit. He was in the Mavic car for ever. He was an expert in all areas of modern race bikes, capable and brilliant and he was an encyclopedia of bike repair knowledge.

He was also a complete jerk, and if you weren't a dentist with a $6,000 Cervelo, he cared significantly less about helping you and repeatedly pushed off jobs to the mechanics who were still learning based on the size of your wallet, rather than the difficulty of the job.

I left him behind and switched to a different shop, where I'm happy to say they have no such patterns. I'm good friends with all the mechanics there, and the time I spend in the shop chatting, and the number of 6-packs I bring in per month, is what determines the quality of my repairs.

Unfortunately, they taught me how to fix bikes, so now they guilt me into doing everything myself. My point is, this mechanic may be the best in texas, and not care as much about one steel bike.

Either way, if you don't have something nice to say, maybe wait until you do?
mdilthey is offline  
Old 04-30-15, 02:24 PM
  #49  
Cycle Dallas
 
MMACH 5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Land of Gar, TX
Posts: 3,777

Bikes: Dulcinea--2017 Kona Rove & a few others

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 197 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by mdilthey
Summary: A lecture from my first grade teacher.
Many of us offered suggestions on adjusting disc brakes or taking them to someone who can. The OP basically claimed that he had done all he was willing to, including taking them to the best mechanic in North Texas. I live in North Texas and that is quite a bold claim. If the mechanic can't or won't properly adjust OP's disc brakes, then he's not worth much, is he?
He shared his opinion that disc brakes suck and apparently wants to keep thinking that.

But really, thank you so much for the manners lesson.
MMACH 5 is offline  
Old 04-30-15, 02:28 PM
  #50  
Senior Member
 
mdilthey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,923

Bikes: Nature Boy 853 Disc, Pugsley SS

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 251 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by MMACH 5
Many of us offered suggestions on adjusting disc brakes or taking them to someone who can. The OP basically claimed that he had done all he was willing to, including taking it to the best mechanic in North Texas. I live in North Texas and that is quite a bold claim. If the mechanic can't or won't properly adjust OP's disc brakes, then he's not worth much, is he?
He shared his opinion that disc brakes suck and apparently wants to keep thinking that.

But really, thank you so much for the manners lesson.
...Great. You wanna scroll up, there might be a nun or an orphan you can pick a fight with next.
mdilthey is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.