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Touring on a hybrid?

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Touring on a hybrid?

Old 06-17-15, 02:02 AM
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thebikenovice
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Touring on a hybrid?

Hello. I am new here, so this may have already been answered somewhere. I have a Cannondale Quick 4 hybrid, which I love. I want to start getting in to touring, and slowly progress there. I have been riding a lot, and building my distance. I am getting ready to order some panniers. I was wondering about consideration when preparing for touring, i.e. hydration, electrolytes, and can touring even be done on a hybrid such as mine. Has anyone else toured on a hybrid? Thanks for the help in advance!
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Old 06-17-15, 04:01 AM
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Why wouldn't you be able to tour on a hybrid?
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Old 06-17-15, 04:43 AM
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What is a hybrid? Does it run on pedals and wind, or something like that?

Hey man a bike is a bike. If you can carry what you need, then you can tour on it.
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Old 06-17-15, 05:45 AM
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Originally Posted by thebikenovice View Post
Hello. .....can touring even be done on a hybrid such as mine. Has anyone else toured on a hybrid?
oh my god! no!
you may NOT tour on a hybrid!
that's like totally crazy, man!
the authorities will take you out immediately!
i'm talking drone strikes and everything.

tour on a hybrid!

what a maroon!
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Old 06-17-15, 05:46 AM
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um, on second thought.
you said "hybrid" right?
oh. that's okay then.
sure.
you can tour on a hybrid.
i just thought...oh never mind.
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Old 06-17-15, 05:50 AM
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Originally Posted by jargo432 View Post
What is a hybrid? Does it run on pedals and wind, or something like that?

Hey man a bike is a bike. If you can carry what you need, then you can tour on it.
2200 miles

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Old 06-17-15, 07:20 AM
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If you're comfortable, ride it. I had a hybrid for a little while, and I found that I didn't enjoy riding it over long distances, but that's not going to be true of everyone.

I had a rack on the back for panniers and a small platform rack on the front. I also strapped some stuff to my handlebars. It did the job, just not as well as the touring bike that replaced it. But really it's mostly about comfort over the course of a long day in the saddle and about ability to carry what you need. There's no reason a hybrid can't fit that bill.
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Old 06-17-15, 07:57 AM
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If you are comfortable for a lot of miles, then use it. Get a rack, toss some bags on it, and have fun. Short overnight rides to campgrounds/hotels/b&bs in your region are a great way to get started and test your equipment.
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Old 06-17-15, 08:21 AM
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your bike has good gearing, 48/38/28 front crank and a 11-32 rear cassette, that gives you a rather good low gear and this will be a big factor in making it easier to ride your bike up hills when it has extra weight on it.

So basically, if you dont overload the heck out of it, and are comfortable on it in general, your bike will work very well for trying out touring.

Just remember that the carbon fork will not allow you to clamp on a front rack to it, so this will limit you to rear panniers only. Keep in mind that the wheels are 32 spoke wheels, so depending on your weight, this could be an issue for having problems with overtaxing the rear wheel if you put X amount on the rear. Can't give you an exact number , depends on your weight and the condition of your wheel (spoke tension, specifics of the parts, rim, spokes etc) but just be aware that even if you weigh 140, if you put 40lbs of stuff on the rear of the bike, not only will it handle funny, but you risk having broken spokes.

other than that, buy some panniers and do some rides with stuff in them and see how it goes.

especially, have fun.
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Old 06-17-15, 09:05 AM
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Europe, it's the most common style.. .. trekking , figure 8 bend bars, a common option and an easy swap .

all the controls remain. both bars are 22.2mm.

A bike tour is a thing you do on a bike , touring more verb than noun.
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Old 06-17-15, 09:45 AM
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If you can tour on a bike, it's a touring bike. Very few Euro travellers use English style drop-bar tourers.
Hydration: nice cup of tea.
Electrolytes: nice cup of tea with a sandwich.
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Old 06-17-15, 10:43 AM
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I've toured on a hybrid! Why not? Admittedly the bike didn't handle as well under load as a dedicated touring bike, but it worked out just fine and had great gearing for the hills, had clearance for wide tires & fenders and could take racks & panniers. Those hybrids can be pretty versatile bikes!
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Old 06-17-15, 10:53 AM
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OP, you gotta ask yourself these questions:

1. How far do I plan to ride
2. How much gear/weight will I carry
3. What rack(s)/panniers should I get
4. Am I crazy? (just kidding)
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Old 06-17-15, 12:07 PM
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Thanks everyone. As I said, I am new to the more epic rides. I started on a mountain bike a couple of years ago, and have progressed to much long rides. I have some decent panniers though not fancy (Nashbar), and have been wanting to extend my rides more. Thanks for the advice everyone.
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Old 06-17-15, 12:07 PM
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2200 miles! That is amazing!
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Old 06-17-15, 12:08 PM
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Thanks a bunch. My friends do think I am a little crazy haha. I'm wanting to start out small, work my way into 2 or 3 day trips, nothing too nuts. I have some Nashbar panniers, which are decent and good for what I do. I'm not sure about weight yet however.
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Old 06-17-15, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
your bike has good gearing, 48/38/28 front crank and a 11-32 rear cassette, that gives you a rather good low gear and this will be a big factor in making it easier to ride your bike up hills when it has extra weight on it.

So basically, if you dont overload the heck out of it, and are comfortable on it in general, your bike will work very well for trying out touring.

Just remember that the carbon fork will not allow you to clamp on a front rack to it, so this will limit you to rear panniers only. Keep in mind that the wheels are 32 spoke wheels, so depending on your weight, this could be an issue for having problems with overtaxing the rear wheel if you put X amount on the rear. Can't give you an exact number , depends on your weight and the condition of your wheel (spoke tension, specifics of the parts, rim, spokes etc) but just be aware that even if you weigh 140, if you put 40lbs of stuff on the rear of the bike, not only will it handle funny, but you risk having broken spokes.

other than that, buy some panniers and do some rides with stuff in them and see how it goes.

especially, have fun.
Thanks for the advice. I will check with my local bike shop to make sure of the load I put on my rack and how much I put in my panniers!
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Old 06-17-15, 12:11 PM
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Originally Posted by gerryl View Post
Why wouldn't you be able to tour on a hybrid?
I had seen some other posts on the bike forum talking about bikes specific for touring. I wasn't sure if there was a reason for that. Now I know!
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Old 06-17-15, 01:38 PM
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I might as well ask, how much do you weigh?
Rear only panniers is ok usually unless you really really overload them. I would suggest trying out getting clothes etc together and see how it all fits in your existing panniers. If you have ever camped before where you had to carry your own stuff, hiking, or whatever, just use the same idea--minimum of stuff, layers of clothes, dont bring jeans, etc etc , just to keep the weight down.
If you have to take a tent, sleeping bag, camp mat, that starts to get more bulky, and could be challenging to do it with only rear panniers (without over taxing the rear wheel)

whatever you do, find a good bike shop and tell you are doing a loaded trip on the bike and pay a bit tohave them go over the wheels and check the spoke tensions, this will go a long way to hopefully avoiding spoke issues (IF your load is within reason for those wheels and your weight)
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Old 06-17-15, 01:46 PM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
I might as well ask, how much do you weigh?
Rear only panniers is ok usually unless you really really overload them. I would suggest trying out getting clothes etc together and see how it all fits in your existing panniers. If you have ever camped before where you had to carry your own stuff, hiking, or whatever, just use the same idea--minimum of stuff, layers of clothes, dont bring jeans, etc etc , just to keep the weight down.
If you have to take a tent, sleeping bag, camp mat, that starts to get more bulky, and could be challenging to do it with only rear panniers (without over taxing the rear wheel)

whatever you do, find a good bike shop and tell you are doing a loaded trip on the bike and pay a bit tohave them go over the wheels and check the spoke tensions, this will go a long way to hopefully avoiding spoke issues (IF your load is within reason for those wheels and your weight)
No problem. I have actually lost 55 pounds in the last 15 months. I am down to about 195 lbs, and still working my way down further. I am 5' 11" and fairly muscular, so my eventual goal is 180-185 lbs. Thanks for the advice!
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Old 06-17-15, 01:50 PM
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Consider adding bar end extensions for more hand positions. Real important for long distance pedaling. I'd add aerobars, but that's just me. With good load management(less is better), you're good to go.

Guessing the wheels are 26". Most WM's carry that size tire stuff. Plus, they're stronger than 700's. Do downsize the tire size to reduce weight and improve handling on pavement.
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Old 06-17-15, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by 10 Wheels View Post
2200 miles

If you look close you can see the kitchen sink on there

NICE!!!
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Old 06-17-15, 07:21 PM
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Originally Posted by thebikenovice View Post
No problem. I have actually lost 55 pounds in the last 15 months. I am down to about 195 lbs, and still working my way down further. I am 5' 11" and fairly muscular, so my eventual goal is 180-185 lbs. Thanks for the advice!
ya, I'm the opposite end of the scale, just a bit shorter than you but only weigh 135, so my rear wheels have always had it easier than yours. Just be aware that if when doing test rides and such, if the rear wheel on your bike keeps giving you issues, you could always just purchase a well built, much stronger rear wheel with 36 spokes and a good strong rim.
But cross that bridge when you get to it, and try stuff out first and see how it goes.
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Old 06-18-15, 12:26 AM
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Current Cannondale Quick 4 seems like a nice bike & great value. Aluminum frame & carbon fork is tech that IMO should be copied by more production tourers. If you're used to longer rides on flat bars then it's good to go eh?
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Old 06-18-15, 12:48 AM
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Originally Posted by DropBarFan View Post
Current Cannondale Quick 4 seems like a nice bike & great value. Aluminum frame & carbon fork is tech that IMO should be copied by more production tourers. If you're used to longer rides on flat bars then it's good to go eh?
I love it thus far. I have had no issues with the flat bars on long trips. My main issue has been with the saddle. I need a new one for the longer rides I'm wanting to work up to. Nice light frame (for a hybrid), love the carbon fork. I have already put on new clipless pedals, and my panniers soon. Exciting stuff!
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