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food costs?

Old 04-23-05, 02:15 AM
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food costs?

hi i am trying to make a rough estimate for the costs of my cycle tour, i will be riding across canada, starting in june, this will be my first big trip, i expect to ride between 50 & 100 kms a day, can anyone give me a rough guide to what it would cost per week to feed myself, i know its hard to gudge as everyone needs different amounts but very roughly, i was thinking around $100 does this sound about right?
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Old 04-23-05, 03:11 AM
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$100 a week ( $14 a day) is certainly managable if you prepare your own food. but allow some flexibilty in your budget so you can enjoy a meal out occasionaly. After a week of Ramen noodles dried vegetables and oatmeal a visit to an all-you-can-eat buffet resturant is a welcome respite.
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Old 04-24-05, 03:32 PM
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$14 per day should provide an adequate diet, but it will probably be a spartan diet: noodles, factory-made bread, peanut butter, apples, vegetables, etc. $14 may not be enough to give you the flexibility to pick up artisanal cheeses in rural Quebec (amazing!), croissants or bagels in Montreal, or a decent bottle of wine in Ontario's Niagara region or BC's Okanagan Valley. But you will survive.

It's a big country; food costs vary from region to region. While touring in rural Quebec a couple of years ago, the produce I saw in stores was quite expensive (and not particularly fresh). Ditto for Northern Ontario and the interior of British Columbia.
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Old 04-27-05, 04:22 PM
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Have never toured in Canada yet, but have gone out on my bicycle touring every summer since 1975. Last summer two of us toured the Atlantic Coast corridor from South Carolina to Nova Scotia and back. Our daily expenditure for food was $15 on a normal day of 3500 calories to $20 when we pigged out at 5000 calories a day. Dollar amounts are US dollars.

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Old 04-28-05, 01:55 AM
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14 dollars a day is spartan? Wow. Thats a lot of cereal and peanut butter and bread and mac&cheese, folks. I can probably feed myself on 6-8 a day, and I eat like a pig. I'll have to keep a tally when I do my Lake Erie Tour... in about a week!

But then again I am suspicious that I don't own certain taste buds, which allows me to eat pretty much anything and be perfectly satisfied...
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Old 04-28-05, 06:40 AM
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Figure a base of 2000 Calories a day plus 60 calories per mile. Look at the labels of what you eat or look it up in one of them nutrition books, add it all up. Cheap calories are good fuel but one need vitamins too remember.
Speaking of which, you can worry less(not totally forget) about food sourced nutrition if you bring some good multi-vitamins along, even the most high falutin ones won't run more than 50 cents a day and may save you more than 50 cents a day by eating slightly cheaper foods.
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Old 04-28-05, 07:30 AM
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Be realistic with how often you will eat in restaurants versus preparing your own meals.
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Old 04-28-05, 07:54 AM
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Originally Posted by jfk32
But then again I am suspicious that I don't own certain taste buds, which allows me to eat pretty much anything and be perfectly satisfied...
A touring cyclist can eat pretty much anything and be perfectly satisfied. Full stop.
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Old 04-28-05, 09:30 PM
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When my son and I and another father and son team did our first tour down the Pacific Coast, we thought we could get by at $15.00 and of course you can. But in the end this is how we did it. We spent about $12.00 per person for breakfast. We usually always ate breakfast out as we felt like we just couldn't or didn't want to prepare the amount of food that it seemed we needed to start the day.

We prepared our own lunches and dinner and I would say we spent another $15.00 per person for that. Both sons are Eagle Scouts well trained in outdoor cooking and they laid out some amazing spreads. I always got a kick out of the other bikers at the hiker/biker sites that ate all this freeze dried stuff while we would had something akin to a cruise ship.

One picture is of our memorable breakfast aka thats a big pancake.
And the sons preparing for our crab fest, following a fun afternoon of crabbing at Winchester Bay.
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Old 04-29-05, 08:26 AM
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Breakfast? Oatmeal, oatmeal, oatmeal. Cheap, easy, quick, and STICKS LIKE GLUE in the stomach.

I could eat pretty well for well under $14 a day.

Of course, I'd mostly be eating oatmeal in the am, 3 or 4 pb&j sandwichs in the day with some fresh fruit, and one of those one dollar pasta boxes at night, with a can of chicken and/or some veggies thrown in.
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Old 04-29-05, 03:27 PM
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60 calories per mile seems like more than one would need. I figure at an easy pace of 12-14 mph, I'll consume 600 calories per hour (I'm 155 pounds, age 57), maybe up to 700 if there is a lot of climbing. That's about 35 calories per mile. (Though, I tend to think in terms of calories per hour.)

For foods, you have to find what _you_ can ride on. Milk and I do not get along biking. Even oatmeal has to have time to digest before I can ride hard. PB & jam, fruit, works much better for me. For an evening meal, anything goes, but I usually eat mostly vegetarian (though I am an omnivore). Biking and camping where I do, I want to avoid meat odors to give bears one less reason to visit my camp.

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Old 04-29-05, 10:35 PM
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Originally Posted by sakarias
60 calories per mile seems like more than one would need. I figure at an easy pace of 12-14 mph, I'll consume 600 calories per hour (I'm 155 pounds, age 57), maybe up to 700 if there is a lot of climbing. That's about 35 calories per mile. (Though, I tend to think in terms of calories per hour.)

For foods, you have to find what _you_ can ride on. Milk and I do not get along biking. Even oatmeal has to have time to digest before I can ride hard. PB & jam, fruit, works much better for me. For an evening meal, anything goes, but I usually eat mostly vegetarian (though I am an omnivore). Biking and camping where I do, I want to avoid meat odors to give bears one less reason to visit my camp.
Calories per hour varies greatly with intensity(zero if ya arn't moving), calories per mile is less volotile(slower but longer or short and fast).
40-60 calories per mile is what I burn on an unloaded rig going at a solid speed. 40 tooling along on my road bike, 50 workin hard, and 60 on my MTB(on the road) working hard. I figure slightly less effort but lots more baggage comes to about 50-60 calories per mile. I put down 60 because this is for a cost estimate and it is better not to starve.
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Old 04-30-05, 03:45 AM
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If a person rides regularly (say the distance they would ride in a day on tour), they should see what they eat normally. Then use that as a guide.

I honestly have never calculated my calorie consumption on a tour or randonnee. I eat when I need to. The one proviso is that I have an energy powder mix for randonnees. And because I ride randonnees alot at night, I need to take that into account with what I bring along.

The most significant factor in daily cost on tour is whether you can cook or not. If you can't cook or aren't inclined to, then your costs are inevitably going to be greater than if you can serve up hot, nutritious and delicious food every day. Fuel costs then become a factor.

Another sub-factor is your accommodation. If you stay in hotels/motels, the inclination is to eat in restaurants. If you stay in hostels, there are usually kitchens to cook fresh food that you have bought on the day. If you are at a campsite, there *may* be a camp kitchen, otherwise you are at the mercy of a campfire or your own stove. If you are free-camping (wild camping or guerilla camping), you are entirely on your own unless your diet comprises insects and grass.

On suggestion I can make is to plan your tour on bakeries. They have high-calorie products that can satisfy the appetite of just about any touring cyclist at a reasonable price.
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