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Can I run folding tires on this rim?

Old 09-13-15, 05:06 PM
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DonValley
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Can I run folding tires on this rim?

I recently started adding parts to a used bike I hope to do a tour on this fall. 1991 Miyata 1000LT. I am considering going with some new tires that would be suited to carrying a medium sized load. The front runners I am considering are the Schwalbe Marathon Supreme and The Vittoria Randonneur Pro. I am leaning towards a 32X700 for this bike . I don't foresee riding on anything too rough. Would 35's be better for the typical rural paved road?

The rims on the bike are Arraya VX-300.


Are folding tires suited to this shape of rim?

Thank in advance
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Old 09-13-15, 06:45 PM
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gerryl
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Originally Posted by DonValley View Post
I recently started adding parts to a used bike I hope to do a tour on this fall. 1991 Miyata 1000LT. I am considering going with some new tires that would be suited to carrying a medium sized load. The front runners I am considering are the Schwalbe Marathon Supreme and The Vittoria Randonneur Pro. I am leaning towards a 32X700 for this bike . I don't foresee riding on anything too rough. Would 35's be better for the typical rural paved road?

The rims on the bike are Arraya VX-300.

Are folding tires suited to this shape of rim?

Thank in advance

Being a big fan of comfort I would go with the largest tire you can fit. In my case 35mm would be the minimum I would consider. Yes, you can use folding tires on those rims.
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Old 09-13-15, 06:51 PM
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Fine with a 35 on the front, And......... if you can fit 40s on the back, you will notice a big difference in comfort. Mixing sizes works great, and if a 40 will fit on the front, one size fits both for a spare. For that matter, a 35 woould also fit both for a spare.

You will really like the Supremes if you decide to go that route.
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Old 09-13-15, 07:06 PM
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Thanks for the replies. The bike currently has 25 mm Conti's with no tread on it. It rolls very well and I am surprised how nicely the Miyata rides compared to my previous bike. Can you guesstimate how much rolling resistance will increase with the 35mm or larger Supremes?
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Old 09-14-15, 11:53 AM
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gerryl
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Originally Posted by DonValley View Post
...Can you guesstimate how much rolling resistance will increase with the 35mm or larger Supremes?
Easy to answer: None.

Rolling Resistance | Schwalbe North America
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Old 09-14-15, 12:06 PM
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Originally Posted by gerryl View Post
Just curious--- where did you get the information for this conclusion?
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Old 09-14-15, 12:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Doug64 View Post
Just curious--- where did you get the information for this conclusion?
Did you click the provided link and read the information? That's where he got the information.
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Old 09-14-15, 01:03 PM
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Thanks, I missed that.

The key words that I picked out were, "at the same tire pressure".

Last edited by Doug64; 09-14-15 at 01:18 PM.
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Old 09-14-15, 01:11 PM
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I'd have to see the inside of the rim, . good luck.
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Old 09-14-15, 02:03 PM
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If you're already running narrow tires at a high pressure, then the folding (kevlar belted) tires are probably ok. Make sure you have a "hooked rim".

Originally Posted by Doug64 View Post
Thanks, I missed that.

The key words that I picked out were, "at the same tire pressure".

[h=4]Why do Pros ride narrow tires if wide tires roll better?[/h] Wide tires only roll better at the same inflation pressure, but narrow tires can be inflated to higher pressures than wide tires. However, they then obviously give a less comfortable ride. In addition to this, narrow tires have an advantage over wide ones at higher speeds, as they provide less air resistance.
Above all, a bicycle with narrow tires is much easier to accelerate because the rotating mass of the wheels is lower and the bicycle is much more agile. At constant speeds of around 20 km/h, the ride is better with wider tires. In practice, the energy saving is even greater than in theory as the elasticity of the tires absorbs road shocks, which would otherwise be transferred to the rider and so saves energy.

[...]

The following gives a rough overview of tires and their relative rolling resistance. A direct comparison is impossible though, as the tires have different widths and some are used with very different inflation pressures.
So, they're not even doing a direct comparision between different tires of what they deem to be different classes.
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