Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Another Food Favorites Post

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Another Food Favorites Post

Old 04-30-05, 12:40 PM
  #1  
( d/dx (66x) )^(1/2)
Thread Starter
 
jfk32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Truckee, CA
Posts: 53

Bikes: 2001? Lemond Zurich

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Another Food Favorites Post

So I want to figure out just what people are eating on their tours, as I leave for my "Round Lake Erie" trip in... 6 days! This is what I was planning on taking.

-Oatmeal
-Peanut Butter
-Graham Crackers
-Cereal and Dried Milk
-Granola Bars
-Gatorade Powder to make my own (mucho cheaper)
-Mac & Cheese
-Minute Rice
-I was thinking of taking beans, but don't they take a long time to cook? Any experience here? Barring that, what do you people do for protein? I was going to look into Textured Vegetable Protein, but I don't know anything about it and don't even know if it will keep.
-Protein Powder
-Multivitamins (i have to watch here because they make me temporarily naseous)
-Various Fruit
-Noodles
-Does butter keep for very long in 60 degree daytime temps? I guess I should know this sort of thing by now!

So what else are people eating? And I'm not really looking for "Well we always stop at this and that restaurant or just buy the premade subs at a grocery store," because, well, I think we all know how to do that. I am looking for a self-supported type thing. Things you can get in most supermarkets and will keep for at least a day.

Also, about me, I am the one with missing tastebuds, so I can eat anything, regardless of taste. Taste is not an issue, I'm looking for calories, calories, and more calories. I have a base metabolic rate of well over the standard 2000 calories... probably approaching 3000, so I anticipate eating a LOT of food on tour, just to maintain my 155 pound 6'0'' frame.

Alright well thanks everyone and wish me luck on tour!
jfk32 is offline  
Old 04-30-05, 01:36 PM
  #2  
Lentement mais sûrement
 
Erick L's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Montréal
Posts: 2,253
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 78 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Some of my usual food:

- Minute Rice
- Pasta (shells cook fast)
- Olive oil (you said calories?)
- Salt & pepper (sometimes other spices)
- Oatmeal + Brown sugar
- Hot Chocolate
- Nuts of all kinds
- Dried fruit (raisins are great in oatmeal)
- V8 juice
- Bars of any sorts (granola, energy, choco, fig, etc)
- Breads (bagel, pita, anything that doesn't get squished easily)
- Spreads (peanut butter, nutella, honey, jelly)
- Ramen noodles

Some things I buy along the way but try not carry too long (depends on season):

- Fresh fruit and veggies
- Canned meat (tuna (cold) or chicken (cooked with rice))
- Canned veggies (usually peas, to go with chicken and rice. Water is used to cook rice)
- Canned fruit (sold in any corner store, when there aren't fresh ones close by)
- Fresh meat (Shrimps are best! If it's warm outside, I ask to pack it with ice)
- Eggs (rarely)
- Cheese

I want to carry flour and make bannock and pancakes on my next trips. I've never carried it but beef jerky sounds like a good idea. I eat in restaurant every once in a while.
Erick L is offline  
Old 04-30-05, 02:37 PM
  #3  
Macro Geek
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Posts: 1,362

Bikes: True North tourer (www.truenorthcycles.com), 2004; Miyata 1000, 1985

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by jfk32

-I was thinking of taking beans, but don't they take a long time to cook?

-Does butter keep for very long in 60 degree daytime temps? I guess I should know this sort of thing by now!
Ah, beans, the magical fruit! It does take time to cook most beans. You can presoak four to eight hours to soften them before cooking, but then you will be hauling beans that are sloshing around in water all day. And even soaked pinto or kidney beans, which are relatively quick cooking, need 25 - 35 minutes.

On the other hand, some lentils cook very quickly. Lentils, like beans, are members of the legume family, and are an excellent protein source. Red lentils (which are actually orange) cook faster than any others that I know of, maybe 5 minutes. Some smaller green and brown lentils cook in only 10 - 15 minutes. I suggest looking up some lentil recipes and trying them before heading off; they are not everyone's cup of tea. (I don't camp anymore, but when I did, I made delicious one-pot dinners by cooking a mixture of grains and legumes (e.g., rice, bulgar, kasha, lentils, and soy grits), flavoured with olive or corn oil, herbs, spices, onions and garlic, and topped with grated cheese.)

By the way, always pick through lentils before cooking. Even the best automated sorters occasionally miss a lentil-sized stone. A broken tooth on a trip can ruin your day. And if you buy lentils out of bin in a bulk food store, rinse before cooking. It is remarkable how much dust lentils attract.

Butter is highly perishable. When unrefrigerated, it begins to turn rancid in less than a day. A flavourful oil is a better choice. (Olive oil goes bad too, but not as quickly.)
acantor is offline  
Old 04-30-05, 02:53 PM
  #4  
cyclist
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: vermont
Posts: 352

Bikes: road bike, mountain bike, touring bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'll second the dried cereal and dried milk.
Granted this was for an AT hike but main source of protein was soy nuts added to my trail mix/gorp. They are incredibly high in protein. My other sources were TVP (see recipe below) and canned chicken and tuna foil packets, and dehydrated refried beans (speacial ordered thru NOLS (I got the phone number from the NOLS cookery). Some thing to concider with bike touring is that you can buy a burger much more frequently than backpackers. TVP lasts forever. I just finished a bag that was opened about 4 years ago.
Semi-vegetarian fajitas:
TVP 1/4 to 1/2 cup; chicken boulian (about half a small cube); McCormack Spice Blends Sante Fe seasoning; water. Boil all above till thickened. Add to tortilla with cheese. Eat over pot as it will leak.
Sorry to hear about the taste buds...
Scott
ncscott is offline  
Old 04-30-05, 02:59 PM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 198
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Biquick is a great thing to make both bisquits and pancakes out of, does not need much but water and powdered milk depending on recipe, instead of butter andsyrup which dont keep well use peanut butter and jams for toppings. Add fruit and bake to make sweet cobbler if you like.
lmzimmer is offline  
Old 04-30-05, 03:16 PM
  #6  
Macro Geek
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Posts: 1,362

Bikes: True North tourer (www.truenorthcycles.com), 2004; Miyata 1000, 1985

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by jfk32

Barring that, what do you people do for protein?
Many of the foods you are taking contain protein:

-Oatmeal
-Peanut Butter
-Graham Crackers
-Cereal and Dried Milk
-Granola Bars
-Mac & Cheese
-Minute Rice

The protein comes from three different food groups:

1. Grains: oatmeal, graham crackers, cereal, pasta, and rice.
2. Legumes: peanut butter (peanuts are beans, not nuts).
3. Dairy: dried milk and cheese.

Grains and legumes are not complete proteins in themselves, but become complete when eaten together. For example, a peanut butter sandwich combines grain (wheat) + legume (pb), which yields good quality protein.

Dairy products like milk, yogurt, and cheese contain fairly complete proteins, and also complement grains and legumes. So oatmeal + milk will give you a protein hit, as will rice + cheese.

For more details about how blending foods from different food groups affects the quality of protein, see:

https://biology.clc.uc.edu/courses/bio104/compprot.htm

Or google for "complementary protein" and/or "amino acid."
acantor is offline  
Old 04-30-05, 03:33 PM
  #7  
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 52,152

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 141 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3203 Post(s)
Liked 596 Times in 329 Posts
Just a suggestion/tip ...

On my tour in Australia, and my tour in Wales, what we did was to stop by a grocery store late in the afternoon and pick up something for supper that night, and breakfast the next morning. Then we'd cycle just a little ways to where we were camping that night.

That way, we didn't have to carry a whole pile of groceries with us all day. Food can get heavy and you don't want to haul all that up hills any more than absolutely necessary. Also, it meant we could buy real milk for cereal in the morning, and we didn't have to worry if our butter was going to keep throughout the day, etc. And we could vary our diet based on what the grocery store had, and what sort of facilities we assumed/hoped the campground might have.

For lunch we would stop by another grocery store in some little town and pick up whatever caught our fancy (things that could be eaten without cooking). Then we'd sit outside the grocery store or in a park, if there was one close by, and eat lunch.

And along the way we would make stops at fruit stands or markets or wherever and pick up some some snacks. Mmmmmm!!

I did carry a bit of food at all times just in case, but it was usually something like cookies, or granola bars.
Machka is offline  
Old 04-30-05, 04:08 PM
  #8  
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 52,152

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 141 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3203 Post(s)
Liked 596 Times in 329 Posts
Originally Posted by jfk32
So I want to figure out just what people are eating on their tours, as I leave for my "Round Lake Erie" trip in... 6 days! This is what I was planning on taking.

-Oatmeal
-Peanut Butter
-Graham Crackers
-Cereal and Dried Milk
-Granola Bars
-Gatorade Powder to make my own (mucho cheaper)
-Mac & Cheese
-Minute Rice
-I was thinking of taking beans, but don't they take a long time to cook? Any experience here? Barring that, what do you people do for protein? I was going to look into Textured Vegetable Protein, but I don't know anything about it and don't even know if it will keep.
-Protein Powder
-Multivitamins (i have to watch here because they make me temporarily naseous)
-Various Fruit
-Noodles
-Does butter keep for very long in 60 degree daytime temps? I guess I should know this sort of thing by now!
Just a few specific tips about the items you've listed:

Oatmeal -- go with the non-cook, oatmeal/granola cereal instead of oatmeal you have to cook. It is MUCH quicker and easier to deal with.

Peanut butter -- well, if it works for you, I guess it's all right. Just don't carry a glass jar of it.

Graham Crackers -- good snack food to carry with you. Also consider other cookies.

Cereal and dried milk -- you've got oatmeal/granola, you don't need to carry cereal too. And as for the milk, read my previous post.

Granola bars -- another good snack food to carry with you.

Gatorade powder -- do you really NEED energy drinks? If you eat well, you should be able to get your electrolytes from food, then all you need is water.

Mac & Cheese -- **********? For this you need to carry a box of macaroni and cheese, and you need to have milk, and butter. That's complicated!! Try to find meals where you don't need a whole bunch of additional foods to create them. Think about canned meals.

Minute rice -- not very substantial, but nice for a bit of variety.

Beans -- buy canned beans, they are quick and easy.

Protein powder -- again, do you really NEED this? Buy a hamburger for lunch.

Multivitamins -- just keep in mind that if you are travelling between Canada and the US, the Gatorade Powder, the Protien powder and the multivitamins could be questioned and may be confiscated.

Various fruit -- good, but don't carry it, buy it along the way and eat it there.

Noodles -- not bad, good for variety.

Butter -- not necessary, maybe take a tiny bit of oil for cooking.


If you know you'll have BBQ facilities in your campground, buy some premade hamburgers and cook them up. You can get a half dozen eggs in many places - these can be added to the premade hamburger "sandwiches" for extra protein and also cooked up for breakfast. Cheese is nice for some variety, especially when added to the hamburger creations. Do up some of that a few nights (and breakfasts) and you will have no problem getting your protein requirements or your calorie requirements!

I don't see bread on your list at all. That's another good one. You can buy a loaf and squash it down to about 1/3 its size (it's mostly air). Use that for your hamburger creations at supper, for your eggs at breakfast, and for a sandwich at lunch. A loaf of bread will probably last a few days but keep an eye on it.

What about potatoes? If you've got a fire and can scrounge up some tin foil, you can bake potatoes.


And BTW -- I'm with you on the tastebud thing ... unless whatever it is has A LOT of flavor, everything pretty much tastes: sweet, salty, sour, or bitter. I don't notice the differences in the flavor of things within those categories. (you know that whole coke/pepsi debate -- they all taste exactly the same to me: sweet) I do, however, really notice textures to food, and my fussiness with food is because I like certain textures and dislike others.

Last edited by Machka; 04-30-05 at 04:14 PM.
Machka is offline  
Old 04-30-05, 04:26 PM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 309
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have to agree with everything Machka said... I always carry one meal with me in case of emergencies (or more likely the unexpected beautiful camping spot away from a grocery store)... plus a couple of snacks that I buy along the road... if you are travelling in unpopulated areas, you should consider carrying the food you need but most of the time, if there,s a road, there are people living nearby.
Magictofu is offline  
Old 04-30-05, 04:57 PM
  #10  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: boston
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
powdered veggie burger mixes like Nature burger provides ample portien and carbs and all you do is add water . they cook up in a or sauce pan in 5 min or so, and taste great.
bicyclepatrol is offline  
Old 04-30-05, 06:23 PM
  #11  
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 52,152

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 141 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3203 Post(s)
Liked 596 Times in 329 Posts
I'll add one more thing here.

When I tour, I seem to crave fruit juice, so when I shopped for my suppers, I usually bought a litre of real apple or orange juice. That replenished the liquid I'd lost during the day as well as providing me with vitamin C and some calories.

At lunch, when we stopped in a grocery store to find something quick and easy to eat, among other things, I usually bought a bottle of fruit juice and a 250 ml "drinking box" of soy milk (or two!). I'm mildly lactose intollerant so I can't drink a lot of real milk, but the soy milk is OK. It's also a good source of protein and calories. Just between the fruit juice and soy milk I would put away at least 300 calories.

So don't forget to factor in your beverages as well.
Machka is offline  
Old 04-30-05, 08:24 PM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 8,546
Mentioned: 83 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 163 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Peanut butter and jelly on bagels bread or graham crackers. (Yeah, I *do* carry a glass jar of jelly). I have this for breakfast and/or lunch(es). Sometimes I do oatmeal or cream of wheat for breakfast, but it takes too long, I just want to get going!

Avocados, cheese, tomatos on bread/bagels/crackers. Cheese keeps pretty long. The harder the cheese, the better it keeps - jack bad, cheddar ok, parmesean best.

I carry spices - hot pepper flakes, black pepper, salt, basil, curry power, cumin. Olive oil.

For dinner, I make pasta or couscous (this is very easy, perfect tour food) with paremesean, and often if I can get fresh tomatoes, I just chop those up, saute with garlic and any vegetable you can find (zuccini, broccoli, mushrooms) and some spices. I buy the fresh veggies as late in the day as I can, so I don' t have to carry them too far. SOmetimes I put tuna in - those flavored tuna foil packets are perfect for this. Sometimes I do something rice-based for dinner.

I also carry coffee, coffee filters and a plastic cone - I am an addict, so what can I say, it's more important to me to have fun and be happy than to save weight. So what if I average 60 miles a day instead of 80... I *like* having lots of yummy food with me.

The guy I did my first tour with said you weren't really touring until you had carried a whole pie in your panniers..... don't worry, you won't have to carry it long!

have fun, and eat big!
(just don't forget to stop eating big when you get home.)
valygrl is offline  
Old 04-30-05, 11:12 PM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 275

Bikes: 1984 Raleigh Kodiak Touring, 1992 Scott MTB, 2004 Fuji Touring

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by valygrl
For dinner, I make pasta or couscous (this is very easy, perfect tour food)
I second the couscous. Eat it with the "Tasty Bites" Indian entrees in foil pouches (Trader Joe's is a good source of quick, interesting meals) and you have a 5 minute gourmet meal! You can't go back to ramen or mac & cheese after that.
rnagaoka is offline  
Old 05-01-05, 04:20 AM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 16,771
Mentioned: 125 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1454 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 40 Posts
It all depends on what you can cook at home. On many tours ending in a town campsite, I find that I can pick up one each of a vegetables and small packs of diced fresh meat just prior to hitting camp, and cooking that as a stew. Rice or pasta or spaghetti (or couscous which I haven't tried) can also be cooked. You could make up some packets of seasoning such as curry and dried tomato flakes to add to the pot to create variety in taste.

For cheapness, tinned spaghetti or baked beans or stews are ready made and can be eaten hot or cold, and can be obtained anywhere. You are carrying around water and the can as extra weight, but if you get it soon before setting up camp, that's not such a hassle.

As to TVP, I experimented with it at home, but haven't taken it on tour. It's a high-protein source, and in dried form is ultralight. From my estimation, it probably is the highest ranking in terms of protein return for weight.

TVP does need to be rehydrated, and this is where you need to experiment at home -- on quantities. A few tablespoons full can rehydrate for a single meal with vegies without much trouble.

I've used it mainly as a bolognese meat substitute, and in a curry. My main trouble with it is... it makes me fart a lot!

When it comes to remote camping, however, noodle/pasta packs with tinned tuna have become a staple for me.

Now, it seems to me that the keepabilty of food is an issue, and particularly, meat. On my Nullarbor crossing, I found one place that had frozen meat, and by wrapping the plastic package in newspaper, then rolling it in clothing (the sleeping bag would have been better), it would remain frozen for up to two days. Hard-skinned vegetables tend to last longer in warmer conditions. Of course, when it cools off, you can carry a veritable smorgasbord of fresh fruits and vegetables and meat.

And finally, as a spice-up for some dishes, use either bitong (dried meat) or for an Italian touch, dry-skin cabana, sliced thinly. It does need to be wrapped, however, because the surface can get quite greasy.
Rowan is offline  
Old 05-01-05, 04:27 AM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 16,771
Mentioned: 125 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1454 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 40 Posts
On a slightly separate issue in the context of the original poster's question, I am moving closer and closer to thinking that a dehydrator is a really good way to go, if you can cook up meals at home.

Not only meals, but also vegetables and fruits can be dehydrated. It seems to me that in terms of weight, water is the enemy. If you have access to water at the camp destinations, then no problem in using fresh. But if touring in more remote situations, carrying water in food becomes an issue.

Dehydrating meals gives total quality control at home. Well I think it will. When I acquire one.
Rowan is offline  
Old 05-01-05, 04:43 AM
  #16  
cyclist
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: vermont
Posts: 352

Bikes: road bike, mountain bike, touring bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rowan...
If you have a broiler style toaster oven (or you oven) then you already have a dehydrator. Just pop the lid open a little and set the heat on low. Not as good as the real thing, but a good experiement of "will I use the real thing". Since you mentioned this topic first... I do remember the TVP giving me more gas than the beans and rice. Either eat it as a campsite with a calm breeze or bring some gas-x.
Scott
ncscott is offline  
Old 05-01-05, 10:13 AM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 309
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rowan, dehydrators are good for people who go long distance away from civilization...

And if you want cheap dehydrated food stuff, look carefully in your supermaket (rice, pasta, sauces, dry tomatoes, 'broth', spices,...) and in a Korean or Chinese grocery store (veggies, mushrooms, noodles...) its way cheaper than dehydrating your own stuff (not if you grow your own veggies of course) and the oven works well for the rest of your eventual experiments. In middle eastern stores, you'll find tons of very good dry fruits and nuts (nothing like the mixed crap you get elsewhere)... otherwise, you can use lentils and rice as a base for tons of verry good recipes... salami and cheese usually keep long and add tons of flavours to your dishes. At an health store, you'll also find lots of dehydrated stuff... even eggs. I think it is better to learn to cook with what is available to you before trying to dehydrate what you usually eat.

Note: I own a dehydrator that I paid 2$ at a yard sale... I love going mushroom picking and I use it to dry my mushrooms... never used it for any other reason so far.
Magictofu is offline  
Old 05-01-05, 05:56 PM
  #18  
Caffeinated.
 
Camel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Waltham, MA
Posts: 1,541

Bikes: Waterford 1900, Quintana Roo Borrego, Trek 8700zx, Bianchi Pista Concept

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I "third" the couscous idea valygirl listed for supper. With mix-in flavors (cheese/chicken etc.), and add ins(allmost anything)-I don't get tired of this.

Other "quick" hot meals are: Ramen (add tuna/chicken), Lipton Noodles (in envelopes with flavors), soups+sandwich.

I like jelly with my PB, and take either a squeeze bottle, or the little jam/jelly packets available at cafes/restaraunts.

More involved hot meals are easy to do while cycle touring as well. As others suggested, just stop at the grocers a bit before camp for meats or other perishables/breakables (ie eggs/ice cream!), and feast as you would at home. An omellette with rice makes a great dinner.

If its chilly in the morning, hot breakfasts get me started better than cold cereal. Two packs of instant oatmeal (I add some soy powder+sometimes jam) get me going. I need my caffeine as well-no instant, or drip for me-I do espresso lattes (mmm). Similar coffee maker to what I use here. Yeah-I bring ground coffee, powdered milk+extra sugar too.

A great tasting instant drink is Emer'gen-C. They come in small packets, or a box of packets, each about the size of a standard playing card, and maybe 5-10 cards thick. Excellent for electrolite replacement, without the empty glucose carbs (gatoraide makes me feel nasty). Can be made hot or cold, and its "fizzy". They are only about 20 calories though. Should be found in a grocery store with a good sized health foods section.

Another powdered drink idea is "russian tea". Tang mixed with instant tea, cinnamon and nutmeg (to taste). I simply add McNess "pumpkin pie" spice rather than cinnamon+nutmeg individualy (this also adds ginger, allspice and a touch of clove). Very tasty hot or cold. Makes a decent+different camp cocktail as well.

[edit] Unlike hiking/backpacking, you're not bound to your meal selections anywhere near as tight while touring. It's better (as others suggest), to only carry a few meals worth with you. As your appetite varies throughout a tour, you can adjust your menu accordingly. Perhaps carry the list of supper ideas.

Last edited by Camel; 05-01-05 at 06:07 PM.
Camel is offline  
Old 05-01-05, 07:03 PM
  #19  
Stand For Something
 
mntbikedude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Utah
Posts: 401

Bikes: Specialized Hardrock, Raleigh M60

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Fig Newtons I think are great snack tour foods. A couple of my simple meals that stand out. Lunch cup o noodles with bagels and cheese.

Dinner: soft tortilla shells then fill with cheese, avacado, tomatoes, lettuce, sprouts, mushrooms.
mntbikedude is offline  
Old 05-01-05, 07:35 PM
  #20  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 16,771
Mentioned: 125 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1454 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 40 Posts
Two of the things that sustained me on many days in France in 2003 were:

The incomparable jambon et fromage baguette -- ham and cheese roll with crusty crust. A real meal in itself with carbs and protein.

Choclate eclairs pumped full of creamy custard on the inside. One of those for lunch, and I could still be pedalling strongly four hours later!

By the way, thanks for the tips on the dehydrator, and Magictofu on using a bit of creativity in finding alternative shops with stuff already dried. I'll certainly keep it in mind.
Rowan is offline  
Old 05-01-05, 09:06 PM
  #21  
Caffeinated.
 
Camel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Waltham, MA
Posts: 1,541

Bikes: Waterford 1900, Quintana Roo Borrego, Trek 8700zx, Bianchi Pista Concept

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Pasta! I forgot to mention shelf stable stuffed tortalinis. Barrilla brand had several excellent types. The downside is that these did need a bit of simmer time (?~9/10 minutes), and typical pasta problems if at altitude. Very tasty though!
Camel is offline  
Old 05-02-05, 09:16 AM
  #22  
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 27,362

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 152 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6218 Post(s)
Liked 4,217 Times in 2,364 Posts
Originally Posted by acantor
Ah, beans, the magical fruit! It does take time to cook most beans. You can presoak four to eight hours to soften them before cooking, but then you will be hauling beans that are sloshing around in water all day. And even soaked pinto or kidney beans, which are relatively quick cooking, need 25 - 35 minutes.

Butter is highly perishable. When unrefrigerated, it begins to turn rancid in less than a day. A flavourful oil is a better choice. (Olive oil goes bad too, but not as quickly.)
Beans can be prepared by covering them with water, bringing them to a boil and then covering the pot and allow them to stand for 1 hour. Then simmer them, without salt, for about 2 hours. They should be soft but not falling apart. Of course this is the high altitude recipe, they cook a bit faster at sea level.

Now considering that most camp stoves don't have the fuel capacity to simmer for 2 hours, I'd say that beans aren't a good choice, unless you get them canned.

Good call on the butter, too. Butter makes butyric acid when it goes rancid. Butyric acid is one of the nastiest of the organic acids. It's odor (and there doesn't have to be much of it around) will persist for a very long time - as witnessed by many movie theaters around the country. It will also absorb readily into fabrics and skin, leaving you smelling like a really bad porno theater. Leave it at home.
__________________
Stuart Black
Plan Epsilon Around Lake Michigan in the era of Covid
Old School…When It Wasn’t Ancient bikepacking
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!



cyccommute is offline  
Old 05-02-05, 09:25 AM
  #23  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 167
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Lots of hot sauce!

One of my favorites is to cut an avacado in half, use it as a bowl, and mash it up with hot sauce. Instant guacamole! Lots of potassium too (3x bananas).
theden is offline  
Old 05-02-05, 09:26 AM
  #24  
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 27,362

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 152 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6218 Post(s)
Liked 4,217 Times in 2,364 Posts
Originally Posted by Magictofu
...if you are travelling in unpopulated areas...
Or in Iowa...or when there is a Walmart within 120 miles of where you are traveling

I guess you had to be there.
__________________
Stuart Black
Plan Epsilon Around Lake Michigan in the era of Covid
Old School…When It Wasn’t Ancient bikepacking
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!



cyccommute is offline  
Old 05-02-05, 10:05 AM
  #25  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 309
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute
Or in Iowa...or when there is a Walmart within 120 miles of where you are traveling

I guess you had to be there.

I guess some places are just too weird for me! I can't imagine someone burning a tank of gaz and loosing 3 hours just to save 5$ on their groceries...

I think we should try an experiment and build a gigantic super-wal-mart in the Middle of South Dakota and see if people from Coast-to-Coast would decide to drive their SUVs there to 'save' a couple of $ on their groceries and plastic patio furniture....
Magictofu is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.