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Jamis Coda Sport - suitable touring bike for China?

Old 04-30-05, 01:50 PM
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Jamis Coda Sport - suitable touring bike for China?

Hi there,

What do you folks think of the Jamis Coda Sport (https://www.jamisbikes.com/bikes/05_codasport.html) as a long-distance tourer for a 2.5 month cycling trip in Xinjiang, China? The wheels it comes with are better suited for commuting, but if I switched those out and used slightly fatter wheels with semi-slick tires, would it be a good option? It's the most reasonably priced steel-frame touring bike I've come across, and as a poor student launching on this trip, budget is sadly thin. Any ideas on this bike, and on how to outfit it as a touring rig, would be hugely appreciated!

Thanks,
Kate
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Old 05-01-05, 05:16 AM
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How much is it? It looks good except the tires and handlebars, those are easy enough to remedy. I think the 36h doublewall rims are fine and should accept wider tires with no problem. You should offer yourself more hand positions for a journey of this magnitude. Try a search for trekking bars that can utilize your flat-bar shifters and levers, there are some cool ones out there. At the very least add some bar ends.
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Old 05-01-05, 05:22 AM
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Here is a site for trekking bars by modolo
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Old 05-01-05, 07:44 AM
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It came to about $550 for the '05 model. Thanks for the tips - definitely gonna check out some different tires and some bar ends or a trekking bar. Can you recommend any specific tires or bar ends?
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Old 05-01-05, 01:28 PM
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With only a few changes, this bike should prove adequate. I wouldn't quite classify it as a "heavy duty" touring machine, but the basics are there...steel frame, steel fork, full set of braze-ons...

As mentioned in the previous post, double-walled and eyeleted 36-hole rims should get the job done. If you'll be hauling a very heavy load, with much of it over the rear end, then perhaps a stronger rear wheel would help. As for tires, the following have a proven track record...

Continental Top Touring 2000
Schwalbe Marathon
Avocet Cross II K

I agree that some additional hand positions would prove very, uhmm, handy.

Also, if you haven't already thought of it, you should consider bringing along some additional spare parts...cables, spokes, chain links, brake pads, nuts 'n bolts and so forth.

Scott
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Old 05-02-05, 05:03 PM
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Originally Posted by kateonmars
Hi there,

What do you folks think of the Jamis Coda Sport (https://www.jamisbikes.com/bikes/05_codasport.html) as a long-distance tourer for a 2.5 month cycling trip in Xinjiang, China? The wheels it comes with are better suited for commuting, but if I switched those out and used slightly fatter wheels with semi-slick tires, would it be a good option? It's the most reasonably priced steel-frame touring bike I've come across, and as a poor student launching on this trip, budget is sadly thin. Any ideas on this bike, and on how to outfit it as a touring rig, would be hugely appreciated!

Thanks,
Kate
Kate,
A friend of mine did a tour of China for about 6 weeks. He went to some really desolate places. He rode a MTB with some beefy tires and upon return he stated he was glad he did. I recommend that you use a MTB set up for heavy touring.

Jude

PS: If you wish you may send me a private e-mail with contact info. I will give it to him and you can ask him about his trip. I do not have his e-mail but I can get it. He moved to the Wash. DC area awhile back (new job)and I don't have his new e-mail.
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Old 05-02-05, 05:55 PM
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I've heard from both Chinese and Westerners that Xinjiang is amazing! But that the roads are not always in great shape... especially away from bigger cities like Kashgar. Although I am generally not an advocate of MTB for touring, I think that you might find it better suited to the roads there. As for tires, get something that offer some traction without compromising too much on performance. I just ordered some Marathon XR which not only have a good reputation but seems to offer a good compromise between off-road and on-road performances.

By the way, do you plan to cycle every roads in Xinjiang? Although it is a fairly large province, 2 months seems a bit long if biking is your only activity over there.

P.S.: Learn a couple of word of Uighour... it is said to open many doors (even to chinese) in the region. And don't forget a good Chinese phrase book!
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Old 05-03-05, 09:09 AM
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Thanks for the great feedback everyone!

So I went for the Coda Sport over a MTB for a couple of reasons - first, this bike seems to have an identical frame to the Jamis Exile hardtail MTB, which was the bike that a friend of mine used for a 4 month cycling tour of China - he changed out the suspension fork to a regular steel fork and changed the tires to less beefy semi-slicks. If you go to https://www.jamisbikes.com/thebikes.html, and look at 'specifications' for both the Exile and the Coda Sport, the frame is basically the same: "Reynolds 520 double butted chromoly main tubes, double tapered cromo stays, forged dropouts with eyelets".

Second, the Coda Sport is significantly less expensive than the Exile, and since I'd have to buy a new steel fork and tires for the Exile, while I'd only have to buy new tires for the Coda, I figured that financially the latter was my best bet.

I bought Continental Travel Contact tires for the Coda Sport, which are wider (700 x 37), puncture-resistant semi-slicks that should work well on both ashphalt and gravel. Now I'm looking to find good steel racks (aluminium didn't hold up long for my friend) - any recommendations??

Cheers,
Kate
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Old 05-03-05, 12:02 PM
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The cheapest steel racks I found were the Axiom tour du Monde... that's what I have on my new bike but I didn't test-drive them yet. They seem alright so far.
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Old 05-03-05, 03:47 PM
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Tubus make the best steel racks.

Conti Travel Contact aren't the best choice for tyres. Schwalbe Marathon XR would be ideal.
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Old 05-03-05, 08:58 PM
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I think you will be okay with those tires.
I'd do something about the bars., but those trekking bars are just too weird for me.
Maybe just bar-ends, considering your limited budget.

I like Nitto racks but they are pricey.
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Old 05-04-05, 10:17 AM
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Take spare tires and tubes. 700c is not easily available outside of large cities.
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