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Basic Maintenance/Repair ebook for Touring Cyclists

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Basic Maintenance/Repair ebook for Touring Cyclists

Old 11-01-15, 12:38 PM
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Bike Hermit
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Basic Maintenance/Repair ebook for Touring Cyclists

Hello everyone,
I've started work on an ebook outlining basic, routine maintenance and adjustment tips and repair and hack tips for the touring bike. The target audience is cyclo tourists out in the wild- or the not so wild- who might not feel confident that they would be able to fix a problem with their bike well enough to limp to the next shop....no operations that require special tools other than what a practical, reasonably well equipped tourist would be carrying. A few people have asked for something like this and I think fear of not being able to work on the bike prevent some from even trying bike touring. I know there are people on this board who have more knowledge and skill than I do but there are others that don't. I'm interested in hearing from both groups to get feedback on what you think should be included. If there is another ebook already out there please list as I would be curious to check it out.
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Old 11-01-15, 02:12 PM
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Check out: http://www.bikewebsite.com/repair-bike-index.htm
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Old 11-04-15, 05:17 PM
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Originally Posted by raybo View Post
Thanks!
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Old 11-04-15, 10:09 PM
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A worthy project. E-book makes sense for current situation of vast # of different bike parts--in old days only a handful of different components so paper bike manuals were OK. Park Tools website has some good maintenance info but overall I think one would need to search for the best online info to include in the e-book.
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Old 11-04-15, 11:24 PM
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I think that a useful approach would be to concentrate on the approach. A lot of people touring today have access to the net at each McDonalds, etc... Or all the time. There is every imaginable process on youtube, there are free versions of the most complete texts on bike maintenance, out there. Maybe mostly on Russian sites.

Where most tourist lack knowledge is how to approach the question. The specifics are less of an issue.

- The issue is personalizing what they do to their bike. The approach that works for you. How do you look at your gear cluster, or brakes, or load take offs and know what you need to prep for, for you situation. I know virtually nothing about bike maintenance, but I can fix anything on my bikes.

Part of this is what goes wrong on a new bike. Every new one I have had, the cranks started to creak after 500ish miles. What commonly goes wrong on old bikes, say by decade. Any preventative maintenance.

- Outfitting their bikes to be more easily worked on. So just recently I learned some pedals use an allen key (though if they work like mine do, it better be a damn big one). I will spend significant bucks to get everything adjustable by just one key.

- The most efficient hacks to make repairs tourist style on the road. Specialty tools and techniques, for instance I have a freewheel socket somewhere that I welded onto a section of seat tubing, giving me a workbench sized method of cracking the freewheel. Though I use cassettes today. The hypercracker being another example, or kevlar spokes, which for what and why.

- Best practices. I personally think the best practice for flats is to have tires that are zero struggle to get off rims, make sure of this when you buy your bike, or outfit it. After that Quick Stick, PSA patches (but I carry glue and larger patches also), Road Morph pump. The smug feeling you get fixing a tire when all that is in place, makes up for the hassle of the repair. I have never dealt with thorns, so that would be a whole other issue to look into. How many tires, tubes, etc... to carry. Solo, in a group, etc...

Another best practices thing I have been hammering on here is to look at every fastener on the bike; determine what tool you need to address it, and whether you are likely to need to touch it; whether you understand how to do a repair; and then assemble the tools you will need to handle those problems; give consideration to the demands repairs make, when designing your bike, and it's components. Forget about about kits and multi tools.

To me, the strategy is way more important than specifics on how to do something, in most cases, if you have thought it through, and you are semi mechanical, most bike repairs are common sense. But good strategy seems rather uncommon.
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Old 11-04-15, 11:53 PM
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You'd be surprised how many people need to know the basic stuff, change a tire, do the brakes. And if you have rigged solutions for these common problems. A nice thing about an ebook is that it can be predownloaded and read from anywhere as long as they have power. Plenty of people wrote numerous books about plenty things and they will write plenty more. You could personalize it and add some levity and insight during this frustrating repair. bent wheels, loose spokes, handlebars becoming loose or broken, bearings in the cranks messed up, chain and derailur. shifters, cables. Can you loosen a brake cable tie it off and use that in a pinch? It should have a suggested repair kit for a tour and you need to work with that or less.
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Old 11-05-15, 12:39 PM
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Good stuff! Thanks for the feedback. Yes, I am thinking basic repairs and hacks to get to the next town/shop where more complicated repairs requiring special tools or skills can be done if needed. An ebook loaded on the phone with easy to find sections to fix the rubbing brake or out of whack shifter or flat tire.

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Old 11-05-15, 01:16 PM
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How about "Couch to Tour in Two Weeks" or something like that? Since it's basic stuff (that many of us may not even realize needs mentioning), you'll need to put some kind of catchy anyone-can-do-this spin on it.
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Old 11-06-15, 08:23 AM
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I'm of mixed feelings about something like this. Yes, there are perhaps techniques that having things spelled out in front of you can help--I'm thinking perhaps how to figure out proper chain length for your given setup--something I certainly looked up on the net to get the proper answer. But at the same time, working with tools and actually feeling how hard it is to tighten something, or to loosen, or adjust something properly--all really requires doing the stuff beforehand and getting a feel for things. I've made all kinds of errors working on cars, motorcycles and bikes, and I feel some people rely too much on the internet for answers, where for this specific topic, physically fixing or adjusting things, it really comes down to doing mechanical stuff a fair amount before you need it in an emergency setting.

Again, any resource is good, I would just certainly emphasize that one has to physically do repair and maintenance stuff beforehand (and make mistakes) before you are at the side of the road trying to figure out whatever and never tried it before.

Just an observation.
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Old 11-08-15, 09:46 PM
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Originally Posted by TheLibrarian View Post
You'd be surprised how many people need to know the basic stuff, change a tire, do the brakes. And if you have rigged solutions for these common problems. A nice thing about an ebook is that it can be predownloaded and read from anywhere as long as they have power. Plenty of people wrote numerous books about plenty things and they will write plenty more. You could personalize it and add some levity and insight during this frustrating repair. bent wheels, loose spokes, handlebars becoming loose or broken, bearings in the cranks messed up, chain and derailur. shifters, cables. Can you loosen a brake cable tie it off and use that in a pinch? It should have a suggested repair kit for a tour and you need to work with that or less.
I'm a half-decent bike mech but while I've read articles about emergency hacks I probably wouldn't be able to remember the stuff on a tour. Having a pre-downloaded manual could be very helpful since even if one did have internet access one would have to waste some time doing searches. Got an S & S coupler bike 2 years ago--while the packing/assembly steps were individually fairly easy I wasted a lot of time by not doing things in best order. I made pages of notes that speed things up a lot.
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Old 11-11-15, 12:45 PM
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Originally Posted by DropBarFan View Post
I'm a half-decent bike mech but while I've read articles about emergency hacks I probably wouldn't be able to remember the stuff on a tour. Having a pre-downloaded manual could be very helpful since even if one did have internet access one would have to waste some time doing searches. Got an S & S coupler bike 2 years ago--while the packing/assembly steps were individually fairly easy I wasted a lot of time by not doing things in best order. I made pages of notes that speed things up a lot.
Hmmmm, so maybe a section about putting the bike back together after having it shipped to the start of a tour.
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Old 11-11-15, 01:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Bike Hermit View Post
Hmmmm, so maybe a section about putting the bike back together after having it shipped to the start of a tour.
thats pretty basic, put front rack on if needed, put front wheel on, put handlebars back on, put seat on, put pedals on, put front fender on if needed.
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Old 11-11-15, 01:49 PM
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Out here the carton comes in marked 'assemble' or 'Do not assemble' , which means the shop sets it aside
for the owner to do when they get off the Bus ( From PDX)

and you only pay something like $10 for the receiving and storage ..

then you get a shop corner and maybe an extra repair stand (unless it has just sold) to put it back together..
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