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What's the most durable 32H Rear disc hub?

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What's the most durable 32H Rear disc hub?

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Old 11-25-15, 10:37 PM
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mdilthey
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What's the most durable 32H Rear disc hub?

...and why is it the DT 240S?

Jokes aside, this seems to be the most durable that I can find through a bit of research. Anyone know a better one?
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Old 11-25-15, 10:42 PM
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Same bearings in the 350. It doesn't have a machined finish which might or might not make the 240S stronger. I'm guessing the finish is pretty nice though... I bought the 350's.
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Old 11-26-15, 12:36 AM
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The star ratchet system is easy to maintain and not full of fussy little parts. And you don't need tools to pull off the freehub in case you break a spoke. These get my vote as one of the best hubs on the market.
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Old 11-26-15, 03:20 AM
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I'd say pretty much every proper cartridge bearing platform hub is nearly equal in quality / durability. Some are easier to maintain (hope is one of the easiest as it's basically tool free)
So
White
Hope
Phil Wood
King
DT Swiss
etc.
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Old 11-26-15, 10:18 AM
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Rohloff.
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Old 11-28-15, 12:57 AM
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Shimano XT.

Personally, I prefer loose ball bearings that I can adjust, service, re-lube, etc. Other people prefer cartridge bearings so that they can not touch them for years without damaging their hub.
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Old 11-28-15, 02:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Chris_W View Post
Shimano XT.

Personally, I prefer loose ball bearings that I can adjust, service, re-lube, etc. Other people prefer cartridge bearings so that they can not touch them for years without damaging their hub.
I understand the appeal of loose ball bearings and serviceability, but if your rear wheel breaks a spoke or your hub develops some play do you normally tour with a cassette removal tool, cone wrenches, and bearing grease? I wouldn't want to.

The nice thing about a hub from DT Swiss is that you can remove the freehub and the cassette along with it without extra tools. Makes spoke replacement simpler and the toolkit more compact.
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Old 11-28-15, 04:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Chris_W View Post
Shimano XT.

Personally, I prefer loose ball bearings that I can adjust, service, re-lube, etc. Other people prefer cartridge bearings so that they can not touch them for years without damaging their hub.
Shimano XT'S have a terrible reputation for cracking freehubs. I especially decided to not get the xt because of thet
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Old 11-28-15, 04:58 AM
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Depends what the OP wants, other than to push the DT. Is it the strongest built wheel, possibly a mater of spoke and hub geometry; the strongest flange, maybe the nod there goes to cold forged; strongest shell, probably Phil, it weighs enough, and that seems to be specifically a focus. Most durable or serviceable bearings; best ratchet system. Without something to measure who is to say. Most durable 32 hole system is either and oxymoron, or maybe a failsafe where something other than the hub will probably be the first to go. Can't imagine answering that question and spending hundreds of bucks on it. One can get a weak set-up for a lot less than that. In my case I went Rohloff, White. And I am really steamed they came out with the 36 the next year.
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Old 11-28-15, 10:25 AM
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Originally Posted by MassiveD View Post
Depends what the OP wants, other than to push the DT. Is it the strongest built wheel, possibly a mater of spoke and hub geometry; the strongest flange, maybe the nod there goes to cold forged; strongest shell, probably Phil, it weighs enough, and that seems to be specifically a focus. Most durable or serviceable bearings; best ratchet system. Without something to measure who is to say. Most durable 32 hole system is either and oxymoron, or maybe a failsafe where something other than the hub will probably be the first to go. Can't imagine answering that question and spending hundreds of bucks on it. One can get a weak set-up for a lot less than that. In my case I went Rohloff, White. And I am really steamed they came out with the 36 the next year.
I am looking for two things:

1. Durability. No individual parts that wear out irreplaceably, demanding a new hub (within reason, I want more than 10-20k, but maybe not 50k). I'm thinking of the flanges and the freehub body.

2. Serviceability. I don't need the bearings to last forever, but I do want to be able to fix the hub when it needs it and easily replace any bearings that do go south.

So, the question is, do I stay with the tried-and-true XT with loose bearings, or do I upgrade to a cartridge system like the DT Swiss? I like the idea of getting a DT Swiss 350 more than I like the idea of investing in a Phil, White, King, or Paul.
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Old 11-28-15, 11:52 AM
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then LX Deore is good enough .. build it 3 cross.
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Old 11-28-15, 11:42 PM
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Phil or Paul would be my choices though Paul currently is not making their 135 Cassette Disk RHUBs because the horrible people at Industry Nine decided to remake their freehub body for 10 speeds and they won't fit in the shells so Paul is looking into doing it hisself or find someone who can do same or better quality!

I would probably say Phil is tops in durability and if that is what you are looking for go with it. Yes you will have to open up the wallet and sweep aside the cobwebs but you will have that hub forever. Plus it is not like DT Swiss 240s are that much cheaper than Phils!
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Old 11-30-15, 02:27 AM
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Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
I am looking for two things:

1. Durability. No individual parts that wear out irreplaceably, demanding a new hub (within reason, I want more than 10-20k, but maybe not 50k). I'm thinking of the flanges and the freehub body.

2. Serviceability. I don't need the bearings to last forever, but I do want to be able to fix the hub when it needs it and easily replace any bearings that do go south.

So, the question is, do I stay with the tried-and-true XT with loose bearings, or do I upgrade to a cartridge system like the DT Swiss? I like the idea of getting a DT Swiss 350 more than I like the idea of investing in a Phil, White, King, or Paul.
Right, very sensible. So for a moment I thought (I am having a hard time shaking this after I think you pointed it out, that DT is no longer loose), that you had DT loose. XT yeah, the flange is probably tops, but the shell you can't trust, it has to go, which conveniently means you can upgrade with a clear conscience regardless of how you approach such things (gear feak, vs frugality).

So then to me the single biggest issue is what cassette system do you want to build to. I am not comfortable on the strength thing with the newer system, mostly the rigging angles, and I think they are needlessly expensive for a touring bike, and that most of our shifters can keep up with them. If I was topping out at 8 or 9, the Bat**** crazy of only a few years back, then I would look for something that takes those cassettes, and really makes the most of them. And that might only be Phil at this point. They are the only company making touring hubs, and maintaining backwards compatibility, as far as I know. But if you want to go all modern on the bike, get shifters that can keep up wit the gears, and to heck with the wheel build issues, cost, and general insanity (perfectly rational if done right). Then you can look at a wide range of hubs. I can't see any reaons to do this at 32, but then I am a big guy no mater how I am starved. Is it a spoke saving thing, because, there are such large weight numbers in the hun choices I wouldn't be going to that first thing.

I would probably rule the DT out because, why? When they had the loose bearing, they were something. Now they are just the unproven guy on the block with latest copy cat hub for MTBS, or however it works. Only thing that might shift me is if I had some really big reason for wanting to go hubs, spokes and rims all DT, it's generally good stuff, and they make the whole system.

The other two I considered are the White, and the Phil. When I got my 40 spoke 700c set-up, I went white, the reasons for this were so crazy, I won't even mention them, the rational reasons were the Ti shell not being as heavy as some that are are strong, and the lower cost, not a big deal. I would not go White again, not because it isn't great stuff, but because my hub is already out of the line after no time. I would go phil, probably swollow the weight and cost, or look at the freewheel hubs that to me are still among the best, but I know what a minority opinion that is. However if you like the new 11 speeds, then White is a good option, not as expensive or heavy as phil. Very attractive if you like the look, they nailed a slightly more vintage look, at least in silver. TRhe shell is Ti, and the cost is OK.

Phil has just redesigned their top end hubs, and they have an article on why their shell is the way it is, which may be interesting. All these hubs are so good, I can't see any realistic chance of a roadside repair on the bearings alone.

Good luck with the quest!
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Old 11-30-15, 10:07 AM
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Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
I am looking for two things:

1. Durability. No individual parts that wear out irreplaceably, demanding a new hub (within reason, I want more than 10-20k, but maybe not 50k). I'm thinking of the flanges and the freehub body.
To be honest, pick your favorite color and go with that. Overall, hub durability...from the (almost) cheapest hub on a Helmart BSO to the most expensive hub you can think of...doesn't matter much. Hubs don't wear out very often. 10 to 20 thousand miles is kind of a low bar in terms of how long a hub can last. If you ride around 3000 miles a year, that's only a bit over 3 years of riding on the low end and 6 on the high end. Just about any hub can stand up to that kind of use and still look and act factory fresh.

Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
2. Serviceability. I don't need the bearings to last forever, but I do want to be able to fix the hub when it needs it and easily replace any bearings that do go south.

So, the question is, do I stay with the tried-and-true XT with loose bearings, or do I upgrade to a cartridge system like the DT Swiss? I like the idea of getting a DT Swiss 350 more than I like the idea of investing in a Phil, White, King, or Paul.
If you want something that can be easily fixed and has readily available bearings, cartridges are the way to go. The bearings in a Phil Wood, White Industries, Paul's and many other cartridge bearing hubs are standard sized bearings that can be easily found at automotive stores if they should need replacement. I have all three and they are all good hubs. I also have a set of Velocity which is another excellent hub for a bit less than the White Industries. Velo Orange also makes a cartridge hubset that is looks pretty good for the money.

Phil Wood bearings are by far the easiest to replace that I've every run across in that they can be removed and installed without pressing the bearing out or in. The easy disassembly makes spoke replacement simpler on the road as well. Velo Orange shares that feature.

As for the "tried-and-true" XT, I'd be more concerned about finding the cones. Bearing replacement is easy but Shimano cones may not be easily available as they change their cone designs from time to time. They put flanges on some and make them longer or shorter or use a different thread diameter. They can be much more difficult to find than is necessary and they may not be cross compatible between the different hubs in Shimano's line. Shimano can be a bit of a pain to deal with and the older the part is the less likely they are to support it.
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Old 11-30-15, 10:11 AM
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Originally Posted by MassiveD View Post

I would not go White again, not because it isn't great stuff, but because my hub is already out of the line after no time.
What do you mean by the hub is "out of line"? I have multiple versions of White Industry hubs with lots of miles on them and have zero problems with them...but then I've not had many issues with any hub.
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