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Suggestions for Thermal Jacket

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Suggestions for Thermal Jacket

Old 11-28-15, 04:19 PM
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Suggestions for Thermal Jacket

I have been looking through previous threads for thermal outerwear, one suggestion a lightweight down jacket. Any thoughts, I have looked at synthetic options and I came across this brand. Any opinions? or other options to consider.

http://www.amazon.com/Outdoor-Resear...+Hooded+Jacket
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Old 11-28-15, 04:46 PM
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I'd avoid hooded jackets. In my experience they severely reduce aerodynamics because the hood tends to catch a lot of air unless you cinch it down super tight. I'd look for a version with no hood and pack a hat/beanie/balaclava.

My cold weather jacket is a Canari Everest by the way. I love it, but it's a different style than what you seem to be looking for.
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Old 11-28-15, 04:49 PM
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When down gets wet, it's not much good. That's a problem when bike riding. How cold are we talking about? A softshell works pretty well; get one a little large and you can layer underneath it.

ABC (anything but cotton) thin layers work well; you want layers that wick away sweat and stay warm when wet. Cotton doesn't do that; nor does down. Wool does; so do a lot of synthetics.
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Old 11-28-15, 07:16 PM
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Let's settle in between. Down with wool and and a hood that fit under a helmet. I will add to that body mapping
Smartwool® Men's PhD® Propulsion 60 Hoody Sport Jacket | Merino Wool

a few more here
Amazon.com: Icebreaker Men's Blast Jacket: Sports & Outdoors
Amazon.com: Icebreaker Men's Blast Long Sleeve Zip: Sports & Outdoors
Men's Wool Aire Sweater
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Old 11-28-15, 07:53 PM
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Montbell makes fantastic stuff. I have their Thermawrap, but the anorak looks awesome.

EX LIGHT DOWN ANORAK | Montbell America

FYI the Thermawrap combined with a Marmot Catalyst jacket get me through New England winters
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Old 11-28-15, 08:52 PM
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For really cold weather, I like a soft shell with some sort of wind stopper fabric as an outer layer. For a down sweater, I like the outdoor research transcendent sweater. I've been very impressed with outdoor research products. That combo got me through a midwest winter.
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Old 11-28-15, 08:54 PM
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There is a new Primaloft insulation out that has the same insulating and compressibility as down. Both North Face and Patagonia make light weight jackets with this material, "Thermoball". I have Patagonia's Nano Puff, and really like it.

Patagonia Nano Puff Insulated Jacket - Men's | Backcountry.com

The North Face ThermoBall Insulated Pullover - Men's | Backcountry.com
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Old 11-28-15, 10:04 PM
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I have Sierra designs 800 fill dridown jacket that I've gotten soaked in and it worked as advertised, continued to insulate and keep me warm. I'm sold on the stuff and have a Dridown bag as well.
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Old 11-28-15, 11:32 PM
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OR makes some nice stuff but for me the only insulated mid layer you would need is the Arc'teryx Atom LT. Super light, comfortable and well made. Though if you are getting cold in the winter make sure you have a windblocking outerlayer because the wind is what keeps you the coldest and if you aren't blocking that you are basically wasting your time. For that I have A2B Commuter Jacket (also made by them) which I think looks nice on and off the bike but has a big zippered rear pocket for cycling that is quite handy. If not that their Incendio is a very minimalist piece for runners that you could probably easily pack into a jersey pocket.

If not those Gore Bike Wear is a good option!
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Old 11-29-15, 12:57 AM
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OR aside, each post give you at least one unique option. Good luck
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Old 11-29-15, 06:53 AM
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For over a decade I have been wearing A TNF Nuptse jacket under a GoreTex shell for winter wear at home when it is not TOOOO cold out. When it gets below 10 (F), then I dig out a really thick parka that I bought 40 years ago.

https://www.thenorthface.com/shop/mens-nuptse-jacket

I do not think they have made any changes in the Nuptse jacket in years, when you get it right the first time, why change it? Mine is from before North Face was bought out by the holding company that also owns Jan Sport, I think they changed the zipper on it after that buyout but I think nothing else.

For bike touring I instead carry a down vest, I try to keep my touring above freezing temperature and a vest is good enough for me with my other gear. It is yellow to be highly visible for those mornings when I want to wear it for my first five miles or so.

I am sold on a down vest for bike touring because sometimes my panniers are slightly more full than I want them to be, down packs down to minimal volume.

On a bike tour, I store my thin fleece stocking cap in a vest pocket so I always know where to look for it.

I also have an Eddie Bauer down sweater, not as thick as the Nuptse, I often use it on canoe or kayak trips when I want something a little warmer than a vest. I think I bought the down sweater over a decade ago, I have no clue if they still make it.

Last edited by Tourist in MSN; 11-29-15 at 08:12 AM.
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Old 11-29-15, 09:37 AM
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You don't say if it's for riding, camp or at what temperature.

I already have a windbreaker so I layer underneath using any combination of:

- t-shirt
- long sleeve underwear (thin & tight)
- long sleeve underwear (thin turtleneck)
- Polartec 100 fleece with 1/4 zip and somewhat loose. Something like this. I mostly use it in camp, as a pillow case and camera padding. I rarely ride in it except to warm up on a very chilly morning.
- Down jacket. In camp only.

Last edited by Erick L; 11-29-15 at 09:41 AM.
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Old 11-29-15, 10:06 AM
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I see lots of people wearing that style of jacket , thin profile style *, not looking like the Michelin man in thick baffles.

set out on a February tour start, had a Marmot down sweater.. Ireland wasn't that cold, mailed it home.

patagonia 'puffball' pullover was enough, under my rain gear. ['97]

* lots of brands want a slice of that market, currently..
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Old 11-29-15, 02:44 PM
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Everyone, thanks for your input, checking out your options now
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Old 12-02-15, 10:32 AM
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Originally Posted by sprocketss View Post
Everyone, thanks for your input, checking out your options now
I would go synthetic, Thermoball.
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Old 12-02-15, 11:35 AM
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Windbreaker only, this one: Voler: Jet Men's Wind Jacket

If that's not warm enough over my riding layers, I get in the bag.
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Old 12-03-15, 03:16 AM
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If you can, go to a store that sells outdoor/hiking clothing and try several models. You want something that fits and most of these jackets don't stretch or very little.
Keep in mind what you want to use it for. As an extra layer underneath a wind/waterproof layer or also as something to wear at the end of the day when you are sitting in front of your tent while you are cooking a meal. In the latter situation wind can be an issue with some designs.

Synthetics are probably better if you use it in very wet conditions but I have yet to run into any real problems with regular down and as others have said, water repellant down can alleviate most classic issues. The big advantage of down however is that it is very compressible and usable over a wider range of temperatures. The best quality down is insanely compressible compared to even the best synthetics. (Think a whole down jacket the size of a can of soda)
Those are also more expensive however so keep an eye on your budget.

- The Arc'Teryx Atom LT Jacket (315 g/11.1 oz) is an excellent choice and the main fabric is pretty windproof as well.
It has Polartec Powerstretch fleece on the sides to help with ventilation and keep you less sweaty. The Atom AR Jacket is the much warmer version that doesn't have the side ventilation but can be used as an outer layer in dry conditions. Mostly for winter/camp use.
- Also keep an eye on jackets using Polartec Alpha. They offer insulation as well as an excellent breathability (I personally own this one in blue), noticably better than most down and other synthetic fillings. In the US I'd say the Marmot Isotherm Hoody (477g/16.8oz) would be an option but perhaps a lighter, non-winter option would be better.
- The North Face's Thermoball Jacket (366g/12.9 oz) is comparable to 600 Cuin/Fill quality down, so pretty good but not the very best. But it does offer excellent insulation, breathability and compressibility. One thing to keep in mind though is that the stitching on the outside means it offers poor wind resistance so it's less usable as an outer layer in windy conditions or around camp.
- Primaloft is another well known insulation material. If you need something a bit warmer you can hardly go wrong with this. Might be a bit warm as a mid layer unless it's freezing however.
- As for down, The Mountain Hardwear Ghost Whisperer Down Jacket is a very lightweight (197 gram/7oz) 800 Fill (high quality) water repellant down jacket. It would probably be my choice if I were to buy one now.

There are several other brands who have their own materials and approaches and there are too many of them to show them here. Either read some reviews or have someone in a shop advise you and make sure to try a few because the fit is important. It should be snug but not too tight and if there is too much room around your waist you will only lose the heat when you use it on the bike.

And as @Tourist in MSN said, a vest might be a more comfortable option. Just keeping your core warm and your arms as a place to get rid of excess heat might be enough in most cases.

Last edited by JaccoW; 12-03-15 at 03:33 AM.
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Old 12-03-15, 07:57 AM
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Originally Posted by JaccoW View Post
The big advantage of down however is that it is very compressible and usable over a wider range of temperatures. The best quality down is insanely compressible compared to even the best synthetics.
On paper it is supposedly compressible. In reality though you risk losing the warmth and some feathers after a while doing so depending on the down.

MontBell Mirage Parka Review - OutdoorGearLab
Compressibility
The 900 fill down is like a sponge for air. Once you tame the beast and get it stuffed away into the included stuff sack the jacket is impressively small. The down returns to normal loft quickly and hasn't shown any loss of warmth yet. After compression the jacket tended to have feathers protruding the fabric so our testers were less inclined to stuff the jacket away, definitely not ideal.
http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/Down-J...-Hooded-Jacket
After compression, the jacket suffered an increase in loss of down and the down migrated to one side of the baffles. This substantially decreased its warmth over the course of testing.

Last edited by erig007; 12-03-15 at 08:01 AM.
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Old 12-03-15, 08:33 AM
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Originally Posted by erig007 View Post
On paper it is supposedly compressible. In reality though you risk losing the warmth and some feathers after a while doing so depending on the down.
I said the best quality down is insanely compressible. Which is usually paired with a fitting fabric and has a better down/feather ratio so there is hardly anything that can get through the fabric.
The review of the Mountian Hardwear jacket that I linked mentions no such issue.
Fabric, construction and down.

You are right that in theory you might lose some feathers and thus insulation. In practice that mostly happens when the jacket is new and after that it hardly ever loses down anymore.
It also helps to just push it back instead of yanking it out and making a small hole bigger.

The choice is for OP however. Slightly more money for a jacket that is 1/3 to 1/2 the weight of the synthetic equivalents.
From his answers thusfar I have no idea what kind of circumstances he wants to use it in or what kind of jacket he wants to combine it with. If he lives in Newfoundland it's a bit more of an issue than if he lives in New Mexico.
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Old 12-05-15, 05:40 PM
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Some great, great suggestions! I like the idea of an outer softshell backed up by a thermal layer. I'm also sold on the OR brand and I have bought a Outdoor Research Ferrosi Hoody Jacket Men's Ferrosi Hoody? | Outdoor Research | Designed By Adventure | Outdoor Clothing & Gear.

Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
For really cold weather, I like a soft shell with some sort of wind stopper fabric as an outer layer. For a down sweater, I like the outdoor research transcendent sweater. I've been very impressed with outdoor research products. That combo got me through a midwest winter.
I am also close to buying the Outdoor Research Transcendent Sweater Men's Transcendent Sweater | Outdoor Research | Designed By Adventure | Outdoor Clothing & Gear, thanks for pointing me in that direction bikemig.

Thanks for all the suggestions, they all would've worked out well.
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Old 12-05-15, 05:51 PM
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Originally Posted by JaccoW View Post
The choice is for OP however. Slightly more money for a jacket that is 1/3 to 1/2 the weight of the synthetic equivalents.
From his answers thusfar I have no idea what kind of circumstances he wants to use it in or what kind of jacket he wants to combine it with. If he lives in Newfoundland it's a bit more of an issue than if he lives in New Mexico.
As to where my bike tour will take me this February, I'll be starting on California coast biking to San Diego, continuing on to Joshua Tree National Park for couple of days, then on to the Grand Canyon National Park, ending my three week trip by traveling back to Phoenix through the Kaibab National Forest.
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Old 12-05-15, 10:29 PM
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Originally Posted by sprocketss View Post
Some great, great suggestions! I like the idea of an outer softshell backed up by a thermal layer. I'm also sold on the OR brand and I have bought a Outdoor Research Ferrosi Hoody Jacket Men's Ferrosi Hoody? | Outdoor Research | Designed By Adventure | Outdoor Clothing & Gear.



I am also close to buying the Outdoor Research Transcendent Sweater Men's Transcendent Sweater | Outdoor Research | Designed By Adventure | Outdoor Clothing & Gear, thanks for pointing me in that direction bikemig.

Thanks for all the suggestions, they all would've worked out well.
Outdoor research makes very fine gear; you'll be happy with the hoody and the sweater.
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Old 12-07-15, 08:45 PM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
OR makes some nice stuff but for me the only insulated mid layer you would need is the Arc'teryx Atom LT. Super light, comfortable and well made. Though if you are getting cold in the winter make sure you have a windblocking outerlayer because the wind is what keeps you the coldest and if you aren't blocking that you are basically wasting your time. For that I have A2B Commuter Jacket (also made by them) which I think looks nice on and off the bike but has a big zippered rear pocket for cycling that is quite handy. If not that their Incendio is a very minimalist piece for runners that you could probably easily pack into a jersey pocket.

If not those Gore Bike Wear is a good option!
+1 on the Arcteryx Atom LT! (I own 3)
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Old 12-07-15, 09:49 PM
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I found down simply too warm to ride in, although fine for sitting around camp.
For out shell rainwear I use a Showers Pass Elite E-vent which is bar none the best ventilated rain jacket I've ever owned.
I bought both the Showers Pass helmet cover and the rain hood but if push came to shove, I'd stick to the helmet cover.

If its simply cold,damp and/or foggy my softshell Marmot Gravity jacket seems to fit the bill.
These are a couple of years old now so likely easy to find discounted I imagine.
They are still well regarded.

Underneath that I layer with a fleece top if its severely cold and I have Macpac merino wool t-shirts as a base layer.

Actually I found a down vest great for around camp on very cold days and as such recently disposed of my down jacket and gained some room in my panniers as the vest folds up in a cram bag to about half the size.

Last edited by rifraf; 12-07-15 at 09:53 PM.
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Old 12-07-15, 09:56 PM
  #25  
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My most effective winter jacket is a Showers Pass raincoat with no insulation. It has incredible ventilation as well as wind and water resistance. I add layers underneath for greater warmth and insulation. For me, a down jacket would be a total fail for riding -- no water resistance or ventilation. They are great for hanging around, walking, skiing and other activities that don't generate a lot of heat and sweat but not highly aerobic ones.
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