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Small small town cemeteries .anyone else love them?

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Small small town cemeteries .anyone else love them?

Old 12-09-15, 11:59 PM
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boomhauer
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Small small town cemeteries .anyone else love them?

This is hands down one of my favorite stops on tour,
I slept in a few but don't try to,
The history is really amazing,
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Old 12-10-15, 12:10 AM
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Originally Posted by boomhauer View Post
This is hands down one of my favorite stops on tour,
I slept in a few but don't try to,
The history is really amazing,
Yes!

On my first trip to the UK, I stayed with a friend who had to work a few days while I was there ... so I cycled to the villages around and had a bit of an explore in general, but stopped at each church and cemetery because they were so fascinating.


Where I work now, I'm a stones throw away from a park that used to be a cemetery. Rowan can tell you much more about its history than I can, but at some point in its history, the occupants were all (or mostly) moved to another cemetery. However, they preserved all (or most) of the headstones, and mounted most of them along a memorial wall. A few of the larger headstones remain in place. And now, it is a really interesting public park.

We have also cycled out to the cemetery where the occupants mentioned above were moved. That is quite a large and fascinating cemetery. We spent quite some time one afternoon going through it.
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Old 12-10-15, 12:35 AM
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Originally Posted by boomhauer View Post
The history is really amazing,


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Old 12-10-15, 12:45 AM
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I like them too.

I worked in a cemetery for a stretch. Buried a lot of people and even dug up a few. During quiet times I would scrape lichen off the headstones with a flat shovel and read the inscriptions. It always surprised me that, even though they are pretty boring places, people are just dying to get in.
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Old 12-10-15, 12:55 AM
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found this one in north east wyoming this summer.
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Old 12-10-15, 12:57 AM
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I dig 'em...well...not like that...But, I do like perusing the names and history of them. As a matter of fact, here in my own back yard, (not a small, small town, but small for a Capitol city, haha) I was walking with my Dad to the LBS, and we were walking past the cemetery here, and I saw one that said "Ann M. Sayre -Wife of Capt. W.J.Sayre. Heroine of Vigilante Days 1863-64." And there it was right next to her, Capt. W.J. Sayer's grave. So, to make a long story short, he led the Vigilantes in the now ghost town of Bannack City, Montana in stopping its sheriff, Henry Plummer, when the townsfolk found out that he was an outlaw and his gang were pretty much running the town corruptly. Well, the Captain and his band of vigilantes didn't take too kindly when they found out about the sheriff's outlaw ways and apprehended the him and his gang and took them too the gallows...Pretty neat story...I'll probably have to put Bannack City on my list of places to see...If my bike frame ever comes in (hopefully soon)...

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Old 12-10-15, 01:14 AM
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Strange you should mention it. I was just reading about an influential folk singer, Kate Wolf, who died in 1986 at the age of 44. She's buried in the tiny town of Goodyears Bar, California near Downieville which is a mountain biking mecca.

Kate Wolf (1942 - 1986) - Find A Grave Photos

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Old 12-10-15, 08:58 AM
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I have a little cemetery, now disused. It is owned by our synagogue, and I keep it in shape. I am turning it into a small nature reserve, with a wildflower meadow, log pile, bee homes and stuff, to join a network of these small old cemeteries across our city.
We have had a few "rough sleepers" and druggies use it, but so far no cycle tourists. It is too well hidden and few people know where to find it.
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Old 12-10-15, 09:16 AM
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As a kid, we lived out of town (Salem Oregon) and wandered all over the area. We discover a group of headstones dated the late 1800's of mostly people most named Jory. This was in an unused heavily forested area. There were actually full size fir trees growing out of some of the graves. Turned out they were one of the first settlers to the area. We wondered about the names and the dates since Oregon hadn't been a a state for that long past the dates on the gravestones. Since then the headstones have been recognized and preserved.

There's lots of history in graveyards. The graveyard in Virginia City Nevada is amazing.
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Old 12-10-15, 04:01 PM
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I thought this one was interesting with the photo embedded in the marble


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Old 12-10-15, 04:14 PM
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Battle of Passchendaele, in Belgium, has Graveyards the size of small Towns..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Passchendaele ; CWGC - Homepage

made friends with one of the landscape maintenance Gardeners keeping them tidy.

He lived in Ypres.

Astoria Maritime Memorial wall (here) has many names of the people who made their livelihoods from the sea.

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Old 12-10-15, 04:24 PM
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There used to be a small cemetery on the way to my mom's old job. We'd pass it if she had to go there on the weekend to pick something up. It was in the middle of freaking nowhere PA along the side of the road. Maybe 8-10 stones. Creepy stuff.
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Old 12-10-15, 04:37 PM
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Fiets,Passchendaele was where my 16 about to be 17 year old grandpa was careless and lost one of his legs. All those big WW1 battle field areas have scores of cemeteries around, all those poor young guys thrown into that mess.
Friends of ours biked through that area this summer and had to avoid the "red zones", the areas so filled with artillery shells shot into that 100 years later they are still off limits.
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Old 12-10-15, 04:38 PM
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Double post by mistake
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Old 12-10-15, 05:00 PM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
Fiets,Passchendaele was where my 16 about to be 17 year old grandpa was careless and lost one of his legs. All those big WW1 battle field areas have scores of cemeteries around, all those poor young guys thrown into that mess.
Friends of ours biked through that area this summer and had to avoid the "red zones", the areas so filled with artillery shells shot into that 100 years later they are still off limits.
Rowan and I have spent a bit of time cycling through that part of the world, visiting the cemeteries, going round to the memorials, etc..
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Old 12-10-15, 05:08 PM
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Belgian Farmers are still having old ordinance come up when they Plow.
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Old 12-10-15, 06:57 PM
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I visted a beautiful graveyard in Le Bourg d'Oisans, the town at the foot of the Alpe d'Huez. The graves were beautifully kept.

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Old 12-10-15, 10:22 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Belgian Farmers are still having old ordinance come up when they Plow.
yup, common occurance. Kinda like rocks here, they slowly get moved back to the surface eventually.

and Machka, certainly brings back the old saying of being lucky when we were born.

Us humans really are a bunch of damn idiots overall when you look at human history and war.....
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Old 12-10-15, 10:47 PM
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Had to visit here



This is in just East of Bismarck, ND



and I love this one in Ontario

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Old 12-10-15, 11:01 PM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
yup, common occurance. Kinda like rocks here, they slowly get moved back to the surface eventually.

and Machka, certainly brings back the old saying of being lucky when we were born.

Us humans really are a bunch of damn idiots overall when you look at human history and war.....
How right you are!

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Old 12-11-15, 04:34 AM
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You might like the Spoon River Anthology by Edgar Lee Masters. It's a collection of poetry he composed based on the imaginary lives he developed for the occupants of small town grave yards.

Marc
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Old 12-11-15, 06:35 AM
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There was a small cemetery on a little bluff on the pasture next to my parents' place in Virginia. The higher part had a couple rows of small white headstones for the white people, and the lower part had a couple rows of uninscribed river pebbles, about the size of bowling balls. That's where the slaves were buried. It was bordered by a couple rows of black walnut trees. There may have been a wooden fence once, but that was before my time. As for maintenance, grazing cows kept the grass down. The whole thing is gone now, replaced by a large house. I don't know exactly what happened, but I strongly suspect it just got bulldozed.
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Old 12-11-15, 09:30 AM
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One of my favorites for sure



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Old 12-11-15, 11:45 AM
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Cemeteries are one of my go to spots for stealth camping. No one goes to them at night, they usually have some woods on at least one side, they often have water and electricity available, and you can usually find a covered pavilion to get out of the rain. I think I've slept at one at least once every tour so far. Here's some pictures from last time I camped at one:





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Old 12-11-15, 12:00 PM
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Yes I too find them interesting, but not just small town ones. Urban ones can be interesting too. The older the better...
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