Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Help a newbie get across Japan: 2016 Fuji Touring VS. Nashbar Touring TR1

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Help a newbie get across Japan: 2016 Fuji Touring VS. Nashbar Touring TR1

Old 02-22-16, 02:42 PM
  #1  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 33
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Help a newbie get across Japan: 2016 Fuji Touring VS. Nashbar Touring TR1

EDIT / UPDATE: Thanks for all the input and discussion, guys -- I've decided to order the Fuji 2016. There were a lot of good suggestions for fixing up older bikes and converting, and even a few recommendations for other, nicer bikes, but the Fuji is ultimately the best choice that was in my price range (a little beyond it if I'm being honest. I'll be selling things on ebay this weekend).

I think it'll serve me better than a bike I could fix up before I leave on my trip, and it'll be a good starter touring bike for me. If I fall in love and get more serious (and start doing more tours on a regular basis, albeit shorter ones) I'll look into a higher end bike. Thanks again for all the input guys!





Hey y'all -- this is my first post about my first tour and buying my first touring bike. Lots of firsts.

The long and short of it is this: in a little over a month, a friend and I are going to bike from Fukuoka to Hokkaido. I've been training on a hybrid bike that's just a little too small for me. I need something better sized and better suited to the adventure. I'm also on a budget, but not quite savvy enough to fix up something I find on craigslist. Through some searching and asking around, I found two bikes that I can fudge into my price range that seem to fit the bill:

The 2016 Fuji Touring

and

The Nashbar Touring TR1

It looks like if I order the Fuji through specialized, it can be had for $730, making it a little less expensive outright. I really love how it looks (though that'll be ruined as I put on new tape and a different saddle) and like the poetic idea of taking a "Japanese bike" to Japan, but I don't know if it's actually a good bike for me or the trip. This Review is generally glowing, and almost made me choose the Fuji outright, but it mentions that the chainstays could be a little longer and might give some taller folks heel clearance issues unless they get a special bag mount of some sort. I'm 6'1" an wear 11.5 US shoes. Are my feet going to be hitting my bags? Is this a really big issue? Can it be fixed? I'm also concerned about gears -- this is my first tour and I'm not particularly knowledgeable -- and I know having the right gearset and grannygear can make all the difference. The Fuji has a Shimano Deore 48/36/26T set. I'll be honest, I don't know what that means for riding / climbing hills at all. I typically just manhandle the shifter until i'm comfortable.

The Nashbar is priced a little higher right now, but customer service tells me that a coupon will drop the price down to about $670 in a day or two. This leaves the two bikes pretty comparably priced, so it comes down to preference, mostly. I have no idea how long the chainstay is on the Nashbar and if it's any better, and I, again, am wholly ignorant of the other components and what's best. The Nashbar says it has 3 x 10 gearting with 50/39/30T.

Both bikes have 700c tires, which I'm told is fine and fairly standard in developed countries, though I wish 26" was available, as, from what i read, they seem to be a little more versatile and available in remote areas.

The other drawback is that I'm not confident I"ll be able to ride either, as my local shops don't seem to stock either of them right now, so I want to be confident in my order. We leave on April 4th, so I don't have a lot of time to sort it out. I want to get the bike as soon as possible so I can fit it properly, learn how to maintain it and spend my last couple weeks at home training with some weighted panniers.

Alternatively, there are a few bikes I'm looking at on craigslist, but for the most part they're either out of my price range, possibly require too much maintenance (out of my expertise to choose the right parts) or the seller isn't responding (but that's a great price for a Surly LHT!).

I've read some great bike vs bike threads on this forum, and was hoping you guys could help me figure things out and learn what I need in order to make the right decision. I'm really looking forward to this trip, and I want to start it out right.

Thanks y'all! And sorry for the general ignorance! I am trying to learn, though!

Last edited by seaniccus; 02-24-16 at 01:37 AM.
seaniccus is offline  
Old 02-22-16, 02:54 PM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: North Shore, MA
Posts: 206

Bikes: Jamis Aurora, Rivendell Sam Hillborne, Surly ECR, Serotta CSI

Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
If you get quality panniers, I don't think you'll have any heel strike issues w/ the Fuji. I commute on a bike with the same length chainstays and I'm about 6' - 6' 1" with size 12 dogs.

I think the gearing is decently low. You could always replace the 26 chain ring on the front with a 24 without fuss, I would imagine, if you want to go lower.
Marc40a is offline  
Old 02-22-16, 02:56 PM
  #3  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 33
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Marc40a
If you get quality panniers, I don't think you'll have any heel strike issues w/ the Fuji. I commute on a bike with the same length chainstays and I'm about 6' - 6' 1" with size 12 dogs.

I think the gearing is decently low. You could always replace the 26 chain ring on the front with a 24 without fuss, I would imagine, if you want to go lower.
That's good to hear! Is there a reason I'd want to choose the Fuji over the Nashbar besides my stupid "it looks neat" reason? And I didn't know you could replace individual gears, I assumed you needed to replace the whole set.
seaniccus is offline  
Old 02-22-16, 03:31 PM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,023
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by seaniccus
That's good to hear! Is there a reason I'd want to choose the Fuji over the Nashbar besides my stupid "it looks neat" reason? And I didn't know you could replace individual gears, I assumed you needed to replace the whole set.

Either one will be fine. Japan's infrastructure is developed to the point where it's fairly painless to use whatever you want. I'd suggest taking a tarp and some rope (paracord or something) with you so the bikes can be quickly taken on trains if it becomes necessary.
manapua_man is offline  
Old 02-22-16, 03:37 PM
  #5  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 33
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by manapua_man
Either one will be fine. Japan's infrastructure is developed to the point where it's fairly painless to use whatever you want. I'd suggest taking a tarp and some rope (paracord or something) with you so the bikes can be quickly taken on trains if it becomes necessary.
Yeah, they have some pretty specific rules about bikes and transit. We still have some research to do on that!

So it's really more about what bike is the best fit for me / a better deal overall?

Still hoping for more opinions and weigh-ins on this over the next day or so (and that I can find one of them at a local shop to test ride a little)
seaniccus is offline  
Old 02-22-16, 03:47 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,023
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by seaniccus
Yeah, they have some pretty specific rules about bikes and transit. We still have some research to do on that!

So it's really more about what bike is the best fit for me / a better deal overall?

Still hoping for more opinions and weigh-ins on this over the next day or so (and that I can find one of them at a local shop to test ride a little)
Choose whichever one fits you best. Or you could do what I do and run a full sized folding bike. It makes things a lot easier if you plan on taking side trips via train.
manapua_man is offline  
Old 02-22-16, 03:54 PM
  #7  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 33
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by manapua_man
Choose whichever one fits you best.
Any recommendations on how to do this without being able to physically test them before purchase? Sorry if I'm repeating myself. I'm really worried about choosing the wrong one, considering that neither seem to be available to try at a local shop.
seaniccus is offline  
Old 02-22-16, 04:25 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
azza_333's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Australia
Posts: 793

Bikes: A few

Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by seaniccus
Yeah, they have some pretty specific rules about bikes and transit. We still have some research to do on that!
If you need any info on touring Japan, or the rules there just ask me. As I have toured and lived there.
azza_333 is offline  
Old 02-22-16, 08:42 PM
  #9  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 33
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Besides those two bikes, this is also an option: Fuji Touring Series

Initially I couldn't tell if it had three gears up front or not, but I got him to send some more pictures. I'd be much obliged if someone on here could offer their opinion -- is it worth buying this $350, older Fuji Touring Series I? Seems to be this model from 1996. Is this site accurate? Should I offer him more around $100? That's a better gamble if I don't like it, but he'll probably reject that.

Here's some of the extra shots:



I'd have to get new wheels probably? Any Thoughts?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
00K0K_4I0RIErRCYR_600x450.jpg (52.1 KB, 46 views)
File Type: jpg
1.jpg (97.9 KB, 43 views)
File Type: jpg
2.jpg (99.0 KB, 42 views)
File Type: jpg
3.jpg (92.7 KB, 42 views)
File Type: jpg
4.jpg (94.4 KB, 43 views)
File Type: jpg
5.jpg (98.3 KB, 42 views)
File Type: jpg
6.jpg (99.2 KB, 41 views)
File Type: jpg
7.jpg (95.8 KB, 40 views)
seaniccus is offline  
Old 02-22-16, 09:42 PM
  #10  
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 16,810

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '88 Schwinn Premis , Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo

Liked 7,749 Times in 4,308 Posts
Bike blue book is often times a joke. This is one of those times. The used fuji is intriguing. It has older brifters for shifting, not a plus but if they work well not a huge negative.
The stem is really long, might ne too long for you but that isn't a tough change.

Personally, i would get a new fuji and not look back. It costs $300 more and thats hardly something to ignore, but in the grand scheme of things it is pretty insignificant and would allow you to have nothing to worry about loke if the bike will break down.

The fuji should have its wheels tensioned by hand at a good shop. Thats pretty much the only downside that comes stock with the bike. The saddle probably isnt great, but none on new bikes typically are.
The new Fuji comes with good gearing and good hubs.

There must be a shop in the bay area witha fuji touring in stock. Performance is out there, they carry the bike, maybe one would have an example.

As for heel strike, you can get a rack which will push the panniers back a bit if the stock rack doesnt work.
Also, some panniers are designed with an angle at the bottom to allow for more space.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 02-22-16, 09:50 PM
  #11  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 33
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mstateglfr
Personally, i would get a new fuji and not look back. It costs $300 more and thats hardly something to ignore, but in the grand scheme of things it is pretty insignificant and would allow you to have nothing to worry about like if the bike will break dow
This is a lot of really good input, thank you. If you don't mind me asking, what makes you recommenced / favor the Fuji over the Nashbar? I sort of like the Fuji a little more too, but I feel like my reasons are arbitrary and without experience. Mind you, I'm not doubting your thoughts here either, I just want to know why so I can learn from your experience.

I didn't really think of it that way -- only $300 more isn't a lot at all considering i'd probably have to put $200 into the old Fuji anyway. Unless I got the old bike for $100, that'd be a waste verses buying the new bike.
seaniccus is offline  
Old 02-22-16, 10:11 PM
  #12  
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 16,810

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '88 Schwinn Premis , Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo

Liked 7,749 Times in 4,308 Posts
The nashbar has a 1" threaded headset and stem. This is old technology. Granted, all my bikes have this, but if i were to buy a new bike, i would expect it to have a 1 1/8 steerer and threadless headset.
The nashbar stem will be easier to fit since you can easily adjust the height which i love, but its just odd and cheap to go that route at this point.

The nashbar fork is hiten steel and not chomoly. Again, just cheap decision. Whats really odd is they sell a chomoly fork with a 1" steerer so they clearly source a better product and it isnt much to expect a basic chromoly fork at this point.

Nashbar gearing isnt ideal for me. I would want lower gearing. This can be changed for $40-50, but the fuji gearing would be good for me out of the box.


The Nashbar bike has brifters and the fuji has bar end shifters. I like bar ends. This is totally individual though and one isnt better than the other.

I dont know what hibs are on the nashbar as they arent listed. Odd. I know the fuji hubs are tried and solid.


If you cant find a fuji touring, ride a Randonee at REI. Its $400 more, but will give you an idea of the fuji sine the shifters are the same, the brake levers are similar, the hubs are the same, high and low gearing is the same, and both are basic chromoly frames.
Again, not the same bike, but there are similarities that would help you decide if you like the style or not...especially the shifting.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 02-22-16, 10:19 PM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 20,602

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Liked 3,703 Times in 2,177 Posts
The fuji touring is fine. You've done your homework.
bikemig is offline  
Old 02-22-16, 10:21 PM
  #14  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 33
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mstateglfr


[SO MANY DETAILS]

If you cant find a fuji touring, ride a Randonee at REI. Its $400 more, but will give you an idea of the fuji sine the shifters are the same, the brake levers are similar, the hubs are the same, high and low gearing is the same, and both are basic chromoly frames.
Again, not the same bike, but there are similarities that would help you decide if you like the style or not...especially the shifting.
Wow, thanks! That's fantastic! And yeah, I can't seem to find a local Fuji anywhere -- it's not listed at any of the local shops that are listed as Fuji retailers (I have to call a few to check) and the performance bikes website says "out of stock" for all the stores within a reasonable distance of me.

I might go check out the bike at REI then, order the Fuji from performance if I like the style and have my local family shop do the wheels for me! Unless someone can offer a better argument, I feel like this is the best course of action at this point -- I kind of liked the Fuji more anyway, and the steel type on the fork I didn't know about, and that sounds like a pretty solid argument. The Fuji just seems like a more up to date budget bike than the Nashbar, byt he sound of it.

Though I have to admit, I don't really understand the signifigance of threaded headsets / stem.
seaniccus is offline  
Old 02-22-16, 10:25 PM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 20,602

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Liked 3,703 Times in 2,177 Posts
The REI randonnee is a better bike. I own a 2009 fuji touring that I picked up used and I think I'm going to sell. There's nothing wrong with it but it's a cheap bike. The 2016 is actually better for touring with a better crank, the threadless stem, and better gear ratios. Still I found the quality of all the parts on the Fuji to be well cheap. The stem is so-so, the wheels are just OK, the tires are cheap, the seatpost is cheap and the frame is a bit on the heavy side. The bike works and I have no big issues with it.

That said, I like pretty much everything better on the Randonnee. The wheels are better, the tires are better, the saddle is better, etc. That should be the case since it is a more expensive bike. I
bikemig is offline  
Old 02-22-16, 10:31 PM
  #16  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 33
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bikemig
The fuji touring is fine. You've done your homework.
Thanks? I feel like I have a lot to learn still!

Originally Posted by bikemig
The bike works and I have no big issues with it.

That said, I like pretty much everything better on the Randonnee. The wheels are better, the tires are better, the saddle is better, etc. That should be the case since it is a more expensive bike.
I'm completely sure this is all true, and I'd probably be considering the Randonnee if I had a bit bigger of a budget -- but the only real reason I can take this trip in the first place is that I'm basically just a freelance journalist right now, and have been for long enough that things are pretty tight in the budget category. To be honest, even these bikes are pushing what I can really manage, but I'm doing some financial gymnastics to make it work, because I know I'll probably be unhappy with anything below this set minimum.

If things go well with the starter bike though, I'll save up and buy a better bike a few years down the line (if I keep touring!)
seaniccus is offline  
Old 02-22-16, 10:31 PM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Elevation 666m Edmonton Canada
Posts: 2,523

Bikes: 2013 Custom SA5w / Rohloff Tourster

Liked 342 Times in 257 Posts
I would go try the used bike first. Looks like a longer and roomier bike. The stem is lame alright.
Offer $300 I guess. It does come with extras. New Schwalbe Marathon plus tires will be about $55 US ?

Those 2 new bike frames look the same to me.

PS Stock tires are usually garbage for ANY tour.

Last edited by GamblerGORD53; 02-22-16 at 10:39 PM.
GamblerGORD53 is offline  
Old 02-22-16, 10:46 PM
  #18  
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 20,602

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Liked 3,703 Times in 2,177 Posts
If you really want to save money on a touring bike, you should think about a used bike. You'll have to learn how to do your own work but that is also a plus since you need to learn this if going touring.

One of the best deals for a touring bike is a used vintage mountain bike (one without a suspension fork). The gearing is right for touring. They tend to be relatively inexpensive. You'll have to swap the tires out (they came stock with knobbies that are not ideal for road riding). The handlebars aren't great for long distance riding but you can swap them out for trekking or butter fly bars pretty easily.

I don't know if this is the right size but here is one that looks decent for the price in SF (which is a high dollar town for used bikes):

https://sfbay.craigslist.org/sfc/bik/5450267386.html
bikemig is offline  
Old 02-22-16, 11:12 PM
  #19  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 33
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bikemig
If you really want to save money on a touring bike, you should think about a used bike. You'll have to learn how to do your own work but that is also a plus since you need to learn this if going touring.
I think this is what I'd be doing if I had a little more time. Between leaving in just over a month and all the work I need to wrap up before we go, I'm not confident that I'll have enough time to find a good used bike and figure out everything I need to convert it. I'm hoping to sort out the bike situation within the next week so I can use what free time I do have over the next month to acclimate myself to the bike, learn how to repair it / break it down properly ( you need to disassemble them to take them on trains in japan ), build it up, and do as much riding as possible with loaded panniers.
seaniccus is offline  
Old 02-22-16, 11:15 PM
  #20  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Elevation 666m Edmonton Canada
Posts: 2,523

Bikes: 2013 Custom SA5w / Rohloff Tourster

Liked 342 Times in 257 Posts
Get serious bikemig. That is a kid size bike. The OP is 6'1. And garbage compared to the used 23" Fuji.
GamblerGORD53 is offline  
Old 02-22-16, 11:36 PM
  #21  
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 20,602

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Liked 3,703 Times in 2,177 Posts
Originally Posted by GamblerGORD53
Get serious bikemig. That is a kid size bike. The OP is 6'1. And garbage compared to the used 23" Fuji.
Sure, thanks. You could always read the post first; that's a radical thought.
bikemig is offline  
Old 02-23-16, 12:23 AM
  #22  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 14
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Shoot me a private message if you pass through Okayama City. My wife and I will show you around.
bikeforlife123 is offline  
Old 02-23-16, 01:38 AM
  #23  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 17
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Wow, thanks! That's fantastic! And yeah, I can't seem to find a local Fuji anywhere -- it's not listed at any of the local shops that are listed as Fuji retailers (I have to call a few to check) and the performance bikes website says "out of stock" for all the stores within a reasonable distance of me.
I bought the Fuji Touring 2016 and I find it to be a great bike. I have heard from several individuals that it is good to get the wheels tensioned but I have not done this yet as I don't plan to tour with it for awhile. If it is out of stock you can simply order it online and it will ship to a performance store for free where they will assemble it for you, which is what I did. Plus they have a great return policy in case you get the wrong size or change your mind.

The bike as worked great for me, but I haven't toured with it yet The guy at performance said it was a great bike to "load up and go wherever you want." Exactly what you want in a touring bike. I think the frame is slightly heavier than what you might find on more expensive touring bikes (LHT). I have a used LHT that I bought before the fuji that doesn't fit me right that seems to be a bit lighter than the fuji even though it is two sizes bigger, but its not a noticable difference and probably won't matter a whole lot when you are fully loaded.

Hope you enjoy your bike like I do mine!
C_hepp is offline  
Old 02-23-16, 02:08 PM
  #24  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 33
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mstateglfr
If you cant find a fuji touring, ride a Randonee at REI. Its $400 more, but will give you an idea of the fuji sine the shifters are the same, the brake levers are similar, the hubs are the same, high and low gearing is the same, and both are basic chromoly frames.
Again, not the same bike, but there are similarities that would help you decide if you like the style or not...especially the shifting.
I did this today, and the XL (guy said it was 58)? Randonee felt great. Sadly, it's def out of my price range, but I think I could learn to really like the shifters (though I might want to add additional break levers in the bar position). I didn't feel very cramped, so it was a good size, geometry whatever. If the Fuji feels anything like that (though maybe a bit heavier by the sound of it) I think I'll be pretty happy with it!


Originally Posted by C_hepp
I bought the Fuji Touring 2016 and I find it to be a great bike.

Hope you enjoy your bike like I do mine!
Me too! I'm hoping to go to a performance and talk to them about it today. Another guy I am talking to said they're selling them in store for even less than shown on the site, so that might be worth it.
seaniccus is offline  
Old 02-23-16, 02:52 PM
  #25  
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 16,810

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '88 Schwinn Premis , Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo

Liked 7,749 Times in 4,308 Posts
Originally Posted by seaniccus
I did this today, and the XL (guy said it was 58)? Randonee felt great. Sadly, it's def out of my price range, but I think I could learn to really like the shifters (though I might want to add additional break levers in the bar position). I didn't feel very cramped, so it was a good size, geometry whatever. If the Fuji feels anything like that (though maybe a bit heavier by the sound of it) I think I'll be pretty happy with it!
Good to hear. The bar end shifters are really why I suggested trying the Randonee since opinions on that style of shifting are pretty polarized.
The Fuji wont be the same bike, but with the same high and low end gear range, and steel frame, its going to give you a pretty good idea.

The geometry of the 2 bikes are extremely similar. .5cm difference in tube angles, minimal wheelbase difference, etc. The Fuji's chainstay is 1.5cm less than the Randonee(44 vs 45.5), but 44 is workable and the right rack can help push panniers back a little more if needed, if the stock rack doesnt work. The Fuji's standover height is 33" vs 34" for the Randonee(58cm XL size). Not a big deal since the rest of the size measurements are similar.


Hope it works out for you, sounds like an incredible adventure.
mstateglfr is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.