Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Anybody tried Banana's packing method?

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Anybody tried Banana's packing method?

Old 02-23-16, 01:39 PM
  #1  
1nterceptor
LET'S ROLL
Thread Starter
 
1nterceptor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: NEW YORK, NY - USA
Posts: 4,746

Bikes: 2014 BMC Gran Fondo, 2013 Brompton S6L-X

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 292 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 13 Posts
Anybody tried Banana's packing method?

Did it work/no fees?

How To Travel With Your Bicycle & Avoid Airline Fees: The Bananas Box & Chop Method:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3uUD-_fdQA
__________________
One day: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=20X43026ukY&list=UUHyRS8bRu6zPoymgKaIoDLA&index=1
1nterceptor is offline  
Old 02-23-16, 05:32 PM
  #2  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 9,098
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1194 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 58 Times in 49 Posts
Nope and have no interest in removing a crankset to travel, I'm sure not convinced that your bike would be in any better shape in this box vs in a traditional cardboard bike box.
djb is offline  
Old 02-23-16, 05:42 PM
  #3  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 5,190

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Salsa Timberjack Ti, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Pink Klein MTB, Phil Wood VeloXS Frame (w/DA 7400), Cilo Road Frame, Proteus frame

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1183 Post(s)
Liked 45 Times in 32 Posts
I have never really been a State bicycle fan and this further cements it. It might be a cute way to pack a cheap fixed gear you don't really care to much about but I wouldn't want to put any of my bikes in there especially not if I have to take the entire thing apart and bring tools to rebuild it.
veganbikes is offline  
Old 02-23-16, 05:52 PM
  #4  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 41,396

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 188 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6905 Post(s)
Liked 239 Times in 197 Posts
Note I have touring riders out here all summer ,

Talked to one guy, had the whole S&S frame packed to meet within the size Max .

the Airline Desk people asked to see what's in the case, and seeing it was a Bicycle charged the fee anyhow.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 02-23-16, 06:02 PM
  #5  
prathmann
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Bay Area, Calif.
Posts: 7,243
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 657 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
The usual airline rule for normal size baggage is that Length + Width + Depth <= 62". Since he says to make the box 30" x 30", that would only allow a depth of 2" which is way too small. Nor do I see the point of chopping off one corner of the box since that doesn't change any of the L + W + D dimensions. Most airline agents will let you fudge a little on the dimensions, especially if the item looks like a regular suitcase. But I can't see getting my regular road bike (60cm frame) into any box that comes close to their 62" rule no matter how much disassembly I do. So I use my Bike Friday folder when flying somewhere.
prathmann is offline  
Old 02-23-16, 06:35 PM
  #6  
nun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,451

Bikes: Rivendell Quickbeam, Rivendell Rambouillet, Rivendell Atlantis, Circle A town bike, De Rosa Neo Primato, Cervelo RS

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I've travelled internationally with my bike and gear in a Tardis soft sided bag and have never been charged for a bike. It just goes on as regular luggage. I remove the wheels, pedals handlebars, rear derailleur and seat post.
nun is offline  
Old 02-23-16, 08:27 PM
  #7  
estasnyc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 153
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by djb View Post
Nope and have no interest in removing a crankset to travel, I'm sure not convinced that your bike would be in any better shape in this box vs in a traditional cardboard bike box.
You definitely don't want to have to repeatedly remove and remount a crankset with a square taper bottom bracket. Well, I don't.

This does raise a question that I've been meaning to ask: is there a touring crankset available that you can put on and pull off again and again on, let's take this to an extreme, something like a weekly basis?
estasnyc is offline  
Old 02-23-16, 08:41 PM
  #8  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 9,098
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1194 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 58 Times in 49 Posts
Outboard bb cranks only need an Allen key to loosen the crank from the bb but I don't own one so I don't know if it's easy to remove it after, I think so.
But really, why so often?
djb is offline  
Old 02-23-16, 08:53 PM
  #9  
estasnyc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 153
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I meant hypothetically as an extreme case. I'm aware that you shouldn't do this with anything that mounts on a square taper BB.

Don't many of the outboard BB cranksets have the bottom bracket spindle integrated onto the driveside crankarm? I'm not up-to-date on this.
estasnyc is offline  
Old 02-23-16, 09:05 PM
  #10  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 9,098
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1194 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 58 Times in 49 Posts
Last summer I replaced the granny gear on a friend's bike and that was the first time I took apart an external bb crank, and yes, the shaft is part of the crankset. It was simple to do now that I think of it, but I only did it the once.
djb is offline  
Old 02-23-16, 09:20 PM
  #11  
estasnyc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 153
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I guess that you should be able to pack that external BB crank into a bike box but it wouldn't pack as easily as something with a separate BB spindle.

So I suppose that I should pose the question as whether there exists a crankset that's very easy to install and remove and also packs into a box conveniently?

Getting back to the original post, I've actually seen this YouTube video before when it got a mention on lifehacker.com but something about it didn't make sense to me. Cutting off a corner of the box doesn't change the length, width or height of the box.

The only way I can imagine this possibly working is if the airlines measure L+W+H indirectly by using the perimeter of the box under the principle that the perimeter P = 2 * (L + H). All that you're trying to do is to cheat the system.

But all that goes out the window as soon as one makes separate measurements for each dimension.

How do the airlines actually measure box sizes?

Last edited by estasnyc; 02-23-16 at 09:49 PM.
estasnyc is offline  
Old 02-23-16, 09:25 PM
  #12  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 9,098
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1194 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 58 Times in 49 Posts
Je ne sais pas
djb is offline  
Old 02-24-16, 07:15 AM
  #13  
mrveloman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Tucker, GA USA
Posts: 133
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
When I fly with my S&S equipped bike, I always remove my Shimano Octalink crank since it fits in the box easier. It is easy to remove/replace with a large 8mm allen wrench and I don't foresee any problems with frequent removals/replacements. I have had airport staff question the content of my S&S case. After I tell them it's a bike, a few want to charge me the fee for a bike. that's when i whip out airline policy on luggage, As long as it is within size and weight (62 inches and less than 50lbs) then it should just be additional luggage fee. I've never had to pay the bike box fee for my S&S bike.

mike
mrveloman is offline  
Old 02-24-16, 07:36 AM
  #14  
Squeezebox
Banned.
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 2,077
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 760 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Sounds like a real good idea to bring a copy of their baggage policy no matter how your bicycle is packed. On some airlines you must make a reservation for your bicycle, from what I've heard.
Squeezebox is offline  
Old 02-24-16, 07:37 AM
  #15  
rhm
multimodal commuter
 
rhm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: NJ, NYC, LI
Posts: 19,136

Bikes: 1940s Fothergill, 1959 Allegro Special, 1963? Claud Butler Olympic Sprint, Lambert 'Clubman', 1974 Fuji "the Ace", 1976 Holdsworth 650b conversion rando bike, 1983 Trek 720 tourer, 1984 Counterpoint Opus II, 1993 Basso Gap, 2010 Downtube 8h, and...

Mentioned: 450 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1567 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 19 Posts
To be clear, Banana is travelling with a bike. He is not touring. He doesn't have racks, panniers, etc.

There's no way that method would work for me and my touring bike.

But it's an interesting idea. If I were going to do a lot of travelling with a bike, going new and interesting places and riding my bike there (but not touring) I would pay extra attention to choosing a frame etc that packs as small as possible. My touring bike has a 61 cm frame, but I can ride a 57 if I have to. I like fenders, but I can live without them. If my favorite handlebar doesn't fit in the box, I can use a different one. Derailleurs? Dynamo lights? Yes, I like them! But if they don't fit in the box, I could leave them home.
__________________
I put new leather on ruined saddles like Brooks, etc. You can reach me by private message.
rhm is offline  
Old 02-24-16, 08:20 AM
  #16  
nun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,451

Bikes: Rivendell Quickbeam, Rivendell Rambouillet, Rivendell Atlantis, Circle A town bike, De Rosa Neo Primato, Cervelo RS

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by rhm View Post
To be clear, Banana is travelling with a bike. He is not touring. He doesn't have racks, panniers, etc.

There's no way that method would work for me and my touring bike.

But it's an interesting idea. If I were going to do a lot of travelling with a bike, going new and interesting places and riding my bike there (but not touring) I would pay extra attention to choosing a frame etc that packs as small as possible. My touring bike has a 61 cm frame, but I can ride a 57 if I have to. I like fenders, but I can live without them. If my favorite handlebar doesn't fit in the box, I can use a different one. Derailleurs? Dynamo lights? Yes, I like them! But if they don't fit in the box, I could leave them home.
Racks are a pain to pack, and I've seen tourists struggling with 4x panniers at check in. That's why a rackless system and gear that will pack along with your bike is convenient when
travelling.
nun is offline  
Old 02-24-16, 08:26 AM
  #17  
staehpj1 
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 9,403
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 237 Post(s)
Liked 19 Times in 16 Posts
Actually the big question is, 'will the airlines actually consider the box under 62" just by cutting the corner off'. If so I can see where this could be worthwhile for some folks in some situations.

As far as all the comments about taking the cranks off... I don't get why folks are so resistant to that. I figure it can be actually as easy or easier than taking the pedals off. In fact I have routinely taken the crank off when shipping in a bike bag. Assembling it takes less time than putting the pedals on. Taking the arms off can be easier or harder depending crank, but even square taper ones can be really quick and easy, some only requiring an hex key. I'd be much more concerned about the headset and all the other stuff.

Most of the time I just fly Southwest with a regular sized box or a bike bag. I accept as OK the $75 fee, which is the only baggage fee needed since on SW two bags and a carry on are free (the bike counts as one carry on, but you pay the $75 bike fee. I tend to have a bike shop ship it home at the end of the trip, which has averaged about $100 between the shipping and packing (the bike shop typically gets a better shipping rate that I do if dealing directly with the carrier), but getting home the same way wouldn't be out of the question.

So I am not sure I would go to the trouble of using this method when I can fly SW with a $75 fee for a regular box, but if I needed to use an airline that charged $200-300 each way I might. I am skeptical of them considering a 30"x30"x6-8" box as being under the 62" limit just because the corner is cut off.
__________________
Check out my profile, articles, and trip journals at:
http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/staehpj1
staehpj1 is offline  
Old 02-24-16, 08:45 AM
  #18  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 23,159
Mentioned: 172 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9049 Post(s)
Liked 674 Times in 414 Posts
Another thing to keep in mind is that size alone may not allow you to avoid the bike fee. Many airlines charge a fee for a bike no matter how small the box. It's the fact of the bike, and not the size of package, that triggers the fee. Now whoever checks you in may neglect to ask what's in the box, allowing you to get away with not paying the fee. But if they find out that it's a bike you will likely be charged. And in this day and age, I certainly wouldn't lie if asked.

I no longer fly domestically with a bike. For what many airlines charge, I can have my bike packed by a LBS, shipped and then reassembled and tuned at the destination. Even with a low-cost airline like Southwest ($75 for a bike), the extra $$ is worth not having to schlepp the bike around. Plus, since I ship the bike ahead of time, I can track its progress and take action if it doesn't arrive as scheduled. I have seen the disappointed look on someone's face when their bike didn't arrive with their flight and they are scheduled to start a supported event early the next morning.
indyfabz is offline  
Old 02-24-16, 09:58 AM
  #19  
Rob_E
Senior Member
 
Rob_E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 2,626

Bikes: Downtube 8H, Surly Troll

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 279 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
Another thing to keep in mind is that size alone may not allow you to avoid the bike fee. Many airlines charge a fee for a bike no matter how small the box. It's the fact of the bike, and not the size of package, that triggers the fee. Now whoever checks you in may neglect to ask what's in the box, allowing you to get away with not paying the fee. But if they find out that it's a bike you will likely be charged. And in this day and age, I certainly wouldn't lie if asked.
It's important to check the airline's policies, and, if necessary, print them out to take with you. I feel like the "If we find out it's a bike, we will charge for a bike" policy has been changed by most airlines, but you can't always count on the person at the counter to know that. The last couple of times I flew with a bike, most of the airlines I looked at specifically said that bikes in cases under 62 inches and under 50 pounds are treated as a regular, checked bag. If the policy doesn't say that, then you may have to cross your fingers and hope.
Rob_E is online now  
Old 02-24-16, 09:59 AM
  #20  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 41,396

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 188 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6905 Post(s)
Liked 239 Times in 197 Posts
Maybe this Banana can Look at Jan Heine's Rinko packing bikes too, at the Vintage Bike Quarterly magazine ..
fietsbob is offline  
Old 02-24-16, 11:56 AM
  #21  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 9,098
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1194 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 58 Times in 49 Posts
the thing with removing a square taper crank is that you need the removal tool and a wrench, my crank removal tool plus a wrench does add x weight and space. I guess if it was a real advantage and given the type of trip, thats ok, but I'd certainly prefer not to have to take those extra tools with me.
djb is offline  
Old 02-24-16, 12:13 PM
  #22  
mdilthey
Senior Member
 
mdilthey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,923

Bikes: Nature Boy 853 Disc, Pugsley SS

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 251 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by djb View Post
Outboard bb cranks only need an Allen key to loosen the crank from the bb but I don't own one so I don't know if it's easy to remove it after, I think so.
But really, why so often?
I can remove/replace my cranks in two minutes with nothing but an allen multitool.
mdilthey is offline  
Old 02-24-16, 12:34 PM
  #23  
prathmann
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Bay Area, Calif.
Posts: 7,243
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 657 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by djb View Post
the thing with removing a square taper crank is that you need the removal tool and a wrench, my crank removal tool plus a wrench does add x weight and space. I guess if it was a real advantage and given the type of trip, thats ok, but I'd certainly prefer not to have to take those extra tools with me.
My travel bike has regular square-taper Shimano 105 cranks and I remove the arms for packing it in a suitcase. Removal and installation is done with a single Allen wrench (the special dustcap acts as the removal tool). It's been on over a hundred trips and I've never had any problem removing or reinstalling the crank arms - they come off with significantly less effort than I've had with pedals.

No airline agent has ever asked me what was packed inside my suitcases, only whether I had packed them myself. I'm sure the TSA scanner shows that there's a bicycle inside, but that's separate from the airline check-in counter
prathmann is offline  
Old 02-24-16, 12:48 PM
  #24  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 9,098
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1194 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 58 Times in 49 Posts
Originally Posted by prathmann View Post
My travel bike has regular square-taper Shimano 105 cranks and I remove the arms for packing it in a suitcase. Removal and installation is done with a single Allen wrench (the special dustcap acts as the removal tool). It's been on over a hundred trips and I've never had any problem removing or reinstalling the crank arms - they come off with significantly less effort than I've had with pedals.

No airline agent has ever asked me what was packed inside my suitcases, only whether I had packed them myself. I'm sure the TSA scanner shows that there's a bicycle inside, but that's separate from the airline check-in counter
interesting, never seen that dustcap that forces the cranks off the axle., neat. Simple and light. Ive only ever used those rather heavy two piece things that you thread into the threads and then have to use a wrench to back the cranks off the axle.
thks
djb is offline  
Old 02-24-16, 12:52 PM
  #25  
gauvins
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: QC Canada
Posts: 1,175

Bikes: Custom built LHT & Troll

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by nun View Post
I've travelled internationally with my bike and gear in a Tardis soft sided bag and have never been charged for a bike. It just goes on as regular luggage. I remove the wheels, pedals handlebars, rear derailleur and seat post.
Did the same and came close to stripping the mount. (maybe it is the jetlag, maybe it is the rush to get all the parts back on, before security insists that we move out of the terminal.) Since I can pack the bike without removing the rear wheel, I am now inclined to leave the derailleur undisturbed. The risks of stripping (quite frequent, it seems) appear to outweigh the risks of bending the hanger in transit.

Last edited by gauvins; 02-24-16 at 12:56 PM.
gauvins is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.