Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

New rear hub, buying decisions?

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

New rear hub, buying decisions?

Old 04-06-16, 01:58 AM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 70
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
New rear hub, buying decisions?

My XT hub is giving a few issues and i'm feed up needing odd sizes tools to get access to freehub and cone spanners to adjust so I'm looking at other options, preferably with cartridge bearing for ease of use.

Firstly I know everyone loves Phil Wood hubs but they are not easy to get in the UK so as yet they are not on my hit list.

I'm fairly keen on the DT Swiss 350 or 240s but am unsure of how they get on with a fair load on the axels, and how the two main 6902 bearing will hold up over time with said load and miles?

The DT's can be full cleaned and lubed with no tools and the non dive side bearing pushed out and replaced with no special tools too but and heres the rub the non drive side need a special tool to get access and this is not one that would be carried on a tour and from experience not many bike shops (out side of Europe and the US) carry these in stock so if this does not hold up to the load / miles too well then it could very be a poor choice.

Also the free hub can be removed with the cases on so drive side spoke replacement is very easy and tool free!

I have a Chris King hub on my MTB and love it but again special tools and non standard bearings so probably not a good choice too.

Hope hubs are good from a bearing servicing standpoint but I hate the freehub! The alloy is too soft and cuts up badly very quickly and my last set of pro2's were also very poor at keeping the crud out too, and the noise is too much too

Am I missing any hubs that are worth a look at?

Any one using DT Swiss hubs and have some feed back in regards to life span of the bearings?

Thanks in advance
damo010 is offline  
Old 04-06-16, 02:26 AM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
elcruxio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Turku, Finland, Europe
Posts: 2,495

Bikes: 2011 Specialized crux comp, 2013 Specialized Rockhopper Pro

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 862 Post(s)
Liked 336 Times in 223 Posts
I've had nothing but good experiences with hope. They are by far my favorite hub maker.

You could consider the pro 2 evo or pro 4 since those seem to have pretty fantastic sealing. And even if the sealing isn't perfect the bearings are still sealed cartridges (and you can get 2rs sealed bearings in there as well) so in touring context it's highly unlikely you can crud up the bearings very easily. The soft freehub issue should be fixed with a steel freehub body, but I haven't noticed a problem with my aluminum one. Sure you get nicks but those are cosmetic.

You can make hope hubs a bit quieter by adding a bit more grease inside the ratchet chamber. My Mono RS hub noise is quite manageable while my Pro 3 is like a waspsnest.

Not to mention you can swap all the bearings without special tools (use the old ones as bearing presses). Getting the freehub seal on without a specific tool is fiddly but doable, but the tool itself weighs a couple of grams.

I think the only really tour suitable hub from dt swiss is the 540 tandem as it has 36 hole drillings. All the others have max 32 holes
elcruxio is offline  
Old 04-06-16, 03:35 AM
  #3  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 70
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I didi have the early hope XC hub that was very good but the later pro2's were crap for sealing, so it sounds like the eve and pro 4's are a lot better then, cool thats good news

I'm happy with 32 spokes TBH, i usually use good old DT comps and brass nips and a sturdy XC / AM rim thats built by a great wheels builder, so far no issues in the slightest in regards to spoke count or strength, in fact the only issues I have had (minor ones) are with the rear hub.

I'm fairly happy with most front hubs. It's just the rear hub that I go into OCD mode LOL

Will check out the DT 540 tho, the older 370 3 pawl one looked good but I can't find one for sale anywhere!
damo010 is offline  
Old 04-06-16, 04:49 AM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
elcruxio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Turku, Finland, Europe
Posts: 2,495

Bikes: 2011 Specialized crux comp, 2013 Specialized Rockhopper Pro

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 862 Post(s)
Liked 336 Times in 223 Posts
If you're a lightweight then 32 spokes may be enough, if the wheel is really well built. I've done a short tour with 32 spokes rear and full rear loading. I'm not a lightweight though and while the wheels stayed intact they didin't stay completely true and I had a hunch that they would have failed on a longer tour.
elcruxio is offline  
Old 04-06-16, 05:14 AM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
robow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 3,872
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 598 Post(s)
Liked 283 Times in 194 Posts
Though the DT Swiss hubs are known to be well made, realize that they also tend to be a little more noisy than many unless you go in and lightly grease the ratchet teeth (don't over do it)
robow is offline  
Old 04-06-16, 08:46 AM
  #6  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,355 Times in 862 Posts
On a tour when your wheel with a rarely seen high end hub has a rim failure , in the busy touring season ,

a small town bike shop, such as here, will cut out the spokes to mail your high end parts home
and sell a mid priced good bang for the buck wheel to get you back on your trip..

ěr just spend a week in the Restaurants Motels and Bar/pubs while the rim is ordered and the custom wheel rebuilt.

mid line Shimano is perfectly serviceable .. steel axle & freehub driver, large ball cup & cone, with rubber boot seals..
fietsbob is offline  
Old 04-06-16, 09:09 AM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
elcruxio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Turku, Finland, Europe
Posts: 2,495

Bikes: 2011 Specialized crux comp, 2013 Specialized Rockhopper Pro

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 862 Post(s)
Liked 336 Times in 223 Posts
Originally Posted by fietsbob
On a tour when your wheel with a rarely seen high end hub has a rim failure , in the busy touring season ,

a small town bike shop, such as here, will cut out the spokes to mail your high end parts home
and sell a mid priced good bang for the buck wheel to get you back on your trip..

ěr just spend a week in the Restaurants Motels and Bar/pubs while the rim is ordered and the custom wheel rebuilt.

mid line Shimano is perfectly serviceable .. steel axle & freehub driver, large ball cup & cone, with rubber boot seals..
What does the rim have to do with the exotic repairable hub? If you dent the shimano cups the hubs a goner so you'll need a new wheel. With cartridge bearings you walk into a bearing shop and put in the new ones.

How your scenario would likely play out would be that you know your spoke length, walk into a shop, they sell you a new rim and the spokes and maybe build the wheel for you and off you go again. Same as with a Shimano hub really.
If you're looking for a whole new wheel, good luck finding something durable with 36 spokes. Not gonna happen all that easily.
elcruxio is offline  
Old 04-06-16, 09:16 AM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
mdilthey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,923

Bikes: Nature Boy 853 Disc, Pugsley SS

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 251 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by elcruxio
What does the rim have to do with the exotic repairable hub? If you dent the shimano cups the hubs a goner so you'll need a new wheel. With cartridge bearings you walk into a bearing shop and put in the new ones.

How your scenario would likely play out would be that you know your spoke length, walk into a shop, they sell you a new rim and the spokes and maybe build the wheel for you and off you go again. Same as with a Shimano hub really.
If you're looking for a whole new wheel, good luck finding something durable with 36 spokes. Not gonna happen all that easily.
A bearing shop? Maybe in Germany... I've never seen one.

I went with the DT Swiss 350. I'm a lighter rider, I run big tires, and I don't carry a lot of gear. The confluence of this is that I almost never have a spoke issue. I carry a Fiberfix spoke and I check spoke tension often.

In my experience, having an expert builder carefully true the wheel will be the ultimate insurance against potential wheel failure. Spoke tension goes a looong way towards wheel strength.

The DT Swiss bearings are - as I've read - a bit easier to source than Hope hub bearings, which is why I went with a DT Swiss 350 over a Hope Pro 2 Evo, but those were the only two hubs to make my short list.
mdilthey is offline  
Old 04-06-16, 09:21 AM
  #9  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,355 Times in 862 Posts
Originally Posted by elcruxio
What does the rim have to do with the exotic repairable hub? If you dent the shimano cups the hubs a goner so you'll need a new wheel. With cartridge bearings you walk into a bearing shop and put in the new ones.

How your scenario would likely play out would be that you know your spoke length, walk into a shop, they sell you a new rim and the spokes and maybe build the wheel for you and off you go again. Same as with a Shimano hub really.
If you're looking for a whole new wheel, good luck finding something durable with 36 spokes. Not gonna happen all that easily.
Spend to your hearts Desire and extent of wallet , just playing "the Devil's Advocate " here :
It won't be repairable if the shop wont have the parts in stock, like if it breaks in, say, on the road to Murmansk.

Last edited by fietsbob; 04-06-16 at 09:24 AM.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 04-06-16, 09:46 AM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
elcruxio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Turku, Finland, Europe
Posts: 2,495

Bikes: 2011 Specialized crux comp, 2013 Specialized Rockhopper Pro

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 862 Post(s)
Liked 336 Times in 223 Posts
Originally Posted by mdilthey
A bearing shop? Maybe in Germany... I've never seen one.

I went with the DT Swiss 350. I'm a lighter rider, I run big tires, and I don't carry a lot of gear. The confluence of this is that I almost never have a spoke issue. I carry a Fiberfix spoke and I check spoke tension often.

In my experience, having an expert builder carefully true the wheel will be the ultimate insurance against potential wheel failure. Spoke tension goes a looong way towards wheel strength.

The DT Swiss bearings are - as I've read - a bit easier to source than Hope hub bearings, which is why I went with a DT Swiss 350 over a Hope Pro 2 Evo, but those were the only two hubs to make my short list.
Bearings are pretty universal so I suppose a bearing shop can be found in every major and also smaller city. Some towns probably as well. They are usually in industrial areas or next to autoshops so not something a passerby would necessarily see.

Spoke tension is indeed something I've been worrying about for a while now. Had to retighten my wheelset as apparently marathon plusses have quite a significant negative effect on spoke tension. Now I'm at 135/82kgf with 36 spokes and fully pressured tire in the rear, which should be enough, hopefully. Something weird I noticed about my GF's trek 520 when I was wrenching that into order. Apparently the stock wheels have peak tensions at 150kgf and average tension at DS at 140kgf. I mean that's nice and all, but I kinda worry about spokes pulling through the rims at those tensions. Weirdly the NDS tension is the same as mine, but that's due to hub choice.
elcruxio is offline  
Old 04-06-16, 09:57 AM
  #11  
Senior Member
 
Tim_Iowa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Posts: 1,643

Bikes: 1997 Rivendell Road Standard 650b conversion (tourer), 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10 (gravel/tour), 2013 Foundry Auger disc (CX/gravel), 2016 Cannondale Fat CAAD 2 (MTB/winter), 2011 Cannondale Flash 29er Lefty (trail MTB)

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 167 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Can you order Velo Orange? I'm very impressed with their Grand Cru Touring hub. Grand Cru Touring Hub 135mm - Hubs - Wheels, Rims, Hubs & Accessories - Components

The hub can be completely dis-assembled without any tools, and the bearings are standard-sized and easily replaceable with standard punches and presses.
The freehub body is steel.
The freehub pawls are a bit loud to begin with, but can be quieted with a tiny amount of light oil or grease.

It's a 10 speed hub, available in 130 and 135 OLD, 32h or 36h, disc or rim brakes, and with Shimano or Campy (alloy, I think) freehub bodies.
Tim_Iowa is offline  
Old 04-06-16, 08:32 PM
  #12  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 70
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I also pack on the lighter side and use high volume tyres with low wish pressures and this does seem to be that way to go for reducing stress on the wheels, bike and rider.

As for the ease of bearing swap out on hope vs DT, its definitely the hope thats easier. DT needs to have the ratchet ring part removed to get access to the drive side bearing and this is the only reason that is making me look at different option. I do really like DT hubs
damo010 is offline  
Old 04-06-16, 08:34 PM
  #13  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 70
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Tim_Iowa
Can you order Velo Orange? I'm very impressed with their Grand Cru Touring hub. Grand Cru Touring Hub 135mm - Hubs - Wheels, Rims, Hubs & Accessories - Components

The hub can be completely dis-assembled without any tools, and the bearings are standard-sized and easily replaceable with standard punches and presses.
The freehub body is steel.
The freehub pawls are a bit loud to begin with, but can be quieted with a tiny amount of light oil or grease.

It's a 10 speed hub, available in 130 and 135 OLD, 32h or 36h, disc or rim brakes, and with Shimano or Campy (alloy, I think) freehub bodies.

Good call on the Grand Cru hub, its looks good to me
damo010 is offline  
Old 04-06-16, 08:36 PM
  #14  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 70
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mdilthey
A bearing shop? Maybe in Germany... I've never seen one.

I went with the DT Swiss 350. I'm a lighter rider, I run big tires, and I don't carry a lot of gear. The confluence of this is that I almost never have a spoke issue. I carry a Fiberfix spoke and I check spoke tension often.

In my experience, having an expert builder carefully true the wheel will be the ultimate insurance against potential wheel failure. Spoke tension goes a looong way towards wheel strength.

The DT Swiss bearings are - as I've read - a bit easier to source than Hope hub bearings, which is why I went with a DT Swiss 350 over a Hope Pro 2 Evo, but those were the only two hubs to make my short list.

I also pack on the lighter side and use high volume tyres with low ish pressures and this does seem to be that way to go for reducing stress on the wheels, bike and rider.

As for the ease of bearing swap out on hope vs DT, its definitely the hope thats easier. DT needs to have the ratchet ring part removed with a special tool that not size or weight friendly to carry on a tour to get access to the drive side bearing and this is the only reason that is making me look at different option. I do really like DT hubs
damo010 is offline  
Old 04-06-16, 09:27 PM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
robow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 3,872
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 598 Post(s)
Liked 283 Times in 194 Posts
Just a thought but you could buy 4 new rear XT hubs for the price of that one Velo hub. Throw a new one on the rear wheel now, toss an extra new one in your pannier if you're so concerned and save the other two for many many years down the road.
robow is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 12:43 AM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
elcruxio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Turku, Finland, Europe
Posts: 2,495

Bikes: 2011 Specialized crux comp, 2013 Specialized Rockhopper Pro

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 862 Post(s)
Liked 336 Times in 223 Posts
Originally Posted by damo010
Good call on the Grand Cru hub, its looks good to me
The only real problem I see with the Grand Cru hub is the absolutely horrid flange spacing which leaves the NDS spokes relatively slack. Hence it kinda requires an offset rim to work.
By my estimate you'll only be able to get 64kgf NDS spoke tension with 120kgf DS tension (which is actually a lot more than most rim manufacturers allow). To me that's really low.

Originally Posted by robow
Just a thought but you could buy 4 new rear XT hubs for the price of that one Velo hub. Throw a new one on the rear wheel now, toss an extra new one in your pannier if you're so concerned and save the other two for many many years down the road.
And since XT hubs have a tendency to crack freehubs you'll need the spares on the road.
Also, doing a complete wheelbuild when a hub goes is to some of us more of an issue than paying a bit more for a hub that just requires a bearing replace every few years. A wheelbuild on the road is possible, but it won't be good or nearly as durable as a properly built wheel (with proper tool and materials)
And also it needs to be considered that Shimano hub bearings going is a lot more likely than with a cartridge carrier hub since Shimano seals are pretty bad even at the top end when compared to the other options which usually offer firstly better seals than Shimano hubs in general and on top of that have sealed bearings as well, ie. double protection.

Now I do use Shimano on my bike as a front hub and my GF has Shimano on her touring bike. There are ways to prevent the scenarios I mentioned to some extent (use lots of properly waterproof grease and steer away from XT rear hubs in favor of steel axle ones) but Shimano still doesn't offer the carefreeness of a cartridge carrier components. In time I hope to have purely cartridge bearinged bike with no cup and cone in sight, even if I do have to rebuild my front wheel.
elcruxio is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 08:10 AM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
Tim_Iowa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Posts: 1,643

Bikes: 1997 Rivendell Road Standard 650b conversion (tourer), 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10 (gravel/tour), 2013 Foundry Auger disc (CX/gravel), 2016 Cannondale Fat CAAD 2 (MTB/winter), 2011 Cannondale Flash 29er Lefty (trail MTB)

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 167 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by elcruxio
The only real problem I see with the Grand Cru hub is the absolutely horrid flange spacing which leaves the NDS spokes relatively slack. Hence it kinda requires an offset rim to work.
By my estimate you'll only be able to get 64kgf NDS spoke tension with 120kgf DS tension (which is actually a lot more than most rim manufacturers allow). To me that's really low.
Hmmm. I'm #225 and I have ~1500 miles on my rear wheel and it has stayed true. (Grand Cru hub laced to a 2nd-generation Pacenti PL23 rim with 36 DT Swiss Competition spokes, built by me).
I didn't use a spoke tensiometer when I built it, nor have I checked it since. But it's given me zero problems, so far so good. Maybe I'll check it next time I ride it to the shop for work.

I did use an offset rear rim on m first wheel build. I laced an offset Velocity Synergy 650b with 36 spokes to a Phil Wood FSA freewheel hub. That wheel has only 1 mm of dish and uses the same spoke lengths on both sides.
Tim_Iowa is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 08:59 AM
  #18  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 70
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Just found these hub and I think we have a winner

https://www.syntace.com/index.cfm?pid=3&pk=2719

bearing can be taped out with out any special tool and a great ring ratchet too.
damo010 is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 09:36 AM
  #19  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,355 Times in 862 Posts
I built wheels around freewheel hubs, Phil Wood, [Sold that set still in good shape] and then Bullseye, 'tandem' with 48 spokes ..
& 40 on the front (700c)

and they have proved them selves reliable for decades ..

only broke 1 spoke (47 spares already in the wheel) , in The British midlands , borrowed a big wrench/adjustable spanner
to unscrew the freewheel remover..

to get to the DS spoke , replaced it re trued the wheel on the bike ,
[I had adjusted the rim true after the spoke broke to be fine to ride on for days..]
then went to the pub for a few rounds with my new friend.

Now I have Rohloff hubs.

Last edited by fietsbob; 04-07-16 at 09:45 AM.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 10:30 AM
  #20  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: SE Penna., USA
Posts: 1,173

Bikes: Too many! Santana tandems and triplet; MTBs; touring bikes

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 88 Post(s)
Liked 19 Times in 15 Posts
If you are interested, I have a used Phil Wood hub, 36-spoke, 135mm, 9-speed Shimano cassette compatible rear hub that I'd be willing to ship to the UK. PM me if you are interested.

I was going to build it into a wheel for my Co-Motion touring bike, but ended up finding a set of pre-built wheels with PW hubs and went with those.

I love the Phil hubs for ease of disassembly using only two 5mm wrenches.
Philly Tandem is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 12:04 PM
  #21  
Senior Member
 
robow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 3,872
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 598 Post(s)
Liked 283 Times in 194 Posts
I no longer have a bike spec'd with a rear drop out of 135 so XT's are of no use to me but if anyone has some old crummy Shimano 105 or Ultegra hubs lying around that they're afraid to tour on, PM me and I'll be more than happy to take them off your hands and reduce your risk of hub failure.
robow is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 12:44 PM
  #22  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 8,901

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2604 Post(s)
Liked 1,928 Times in 1,210 Posts
Originally Posted by elcruxio
And since XT hubs have a tendency to crack freehubs you'll need the spares on the road.
...
And also it needs to be considered that Shimano hub bearings going is a lot more likely than with a cartridge carrier hub since Shimano seals are pretty bad even at the top end when compared to the other options which usually offer firstly better seals than Shimano hubs in general and on top of that have sealed bearings as well, ie. double protection.
I do wonder where such "facts" come from. Might it be raw numbers, with similar failure rates as boutique shops that sell 1% as many parts?

I cracked an LX hub years ago because I overtightened the spokes. The replacement XT hub is still running, some 25,000 miles later. Bearings get repacked every year or two, depending on how bored I am in the winter, and they're still going strong. Not bad for a $35 part with a clyde rider, with daily commuting in all weather and occasional loaded touring.

But if you want to spend lots of money, well, that'll help the economy. Go for it!
pdlamb is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 12:52 PM
  #23  
Senior Member
 
elcruxio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Turku, Finland, Europe
Posts: 2,495

Bikes: 2011 Specialized crux comp, 2013 Specialized Rockhopper Pro

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 862 Post(s)
Liked 336 Times in 223 Posts
Originally Posted by pdlamb
I do wonder where such "facts" come from. Might it be raw numbers, with similar failure rates as boutique shops that sell 1% as many parts?

I cracked an LX hub years ago because I overtightened the spokes. The replacement XT hub is still running, some 25,000 miles later. Bearings get repacked every year or two, depending on how bored I am in the winter, and they're still going strong. Not bad for a $35 part with a clyde rider, with daily commuting in all weather and occasional loaded touring.

But if you want to spend lots of money, well, that'll help the economy. Go for it!
Do a google search. Cracked xt freehub. Should be interestin
elcruxio is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 01:04 PM
  #24  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 8,901

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2604 Post(s)
Liked 1,928 Times in 1,210 Posts
So, as I suspected, you're looking at raw numbers. What are hub sales of Shimano, White, Phil Wood, Velo Orange, etc.? If there's 1% as many Phil Wood failures but Shimano sells 10,000 times more hubs, the failure rate on the Shimano is going to be better. The raw numbers reflected in google searches are meaningless.
pdlamb is offline  
Old 04-07-16, 02:46 PM
  #25  
Senior Member
 
robow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 3,872
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 598 Post(s)
Liked 283 Times in 194 Posts
Thanks a lot pdlamb, interject logic, math, and dispel of older internet myths and I'll never get anyone to send me their crummy shimano hubs
robow is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.