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Trek 970 for long distance touring?

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Trek 970 for long distance touring?

Old 04-13-16, 07:06 PM
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Trek 970 for long distance touring?

Is it still good to get a trek 970 for long distance touring? How much is it worth if in good condition?
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Old 04-13-16, 08:15 PM
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Originally Posted by xybaby
Is it still good to get a trek 970 for long distance touring? How much is it worth if in good condition?
Yes
$200 if you don't have to change anything, tires, wheels, drivetrain, overhaul , etc., come on it's 20yrs old.
but if you measure chain stretch requiring new chain and cassette, any wheel anomaly requiring wheel replacement, new tires it's $150 in a second. Take the chain off and turn the crank to ensure its not notchy, same with the wheels, remove them and spin them holding the axle. Same with headset with wheel on and off. If it self centers you need a new headset. Spin the crank and see the chainrings not wobble.
Basically if you have to replace any major set of components you'll easily spend $250 so decide if $400 + is worth applying to something brand new.
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Old 04-14-16, 03:02 AM
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Lee, just wanted to say excellent specific points to bring up for someone looking at a used bike. It's tough for most people because if they don't have hands on repair/mechanical experience, it's not easy to evaluate stuff like this, even with very helpful pointers like yours.
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Old 04-14-16, 05:16 AM
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I picked up a 1993 trek 950 because I was thinking of using it for touring. The geometry is pretty good for touring as are the wheels and gearing.

One possible problem with an old mtb is that flat bars aren't great for hand positions. You could do a drop bar conversion. Or you could get a trekking bar or a VO crazy bar. Those are flat bars with multiple hand positions. Your existing brake levers and shifters will work on these bars.
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Old 04-14-16, 06:28 AM
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I have a trekking bar so it will be an easy change.
Do you think the geometry is good? I saw people complain about the long top tube. Do you see that an issue? I really like short top tube for long distance touring.

And how much did you pay for your 950?

Originally Posted by bikemig
I picked up a 1993 trek 950 because I was thinking of using it for touring. The geometry is pretty good for touring as are the wheels and gearing.

One possible problem with an old mtb is that flat bars aren't great for hand positions. You could do a drop bar conversion. Or you could get a trekking bar or a VO crazy bar. Those are flat bars with multiple hand positions. Your existing brake levers and shifters will work on these bars.
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Old 04-14-16, 07:22 AM
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Originally Posted by xybaby
I have a trekking bar so it will be an easy change.
Do you think the geometry is good? I saw people complain about the long top tube. Do you see that an issue? I really like short top tube for long distance touring.

And how much did you pay for your 950?
There are a couple of valuation threads on old mtbs. They typically don't go for much. I paid $125 for my 950 but that's a pretty decent price. I think a fair price for a 970 could go higher. Location matters too for pricing.

The long top tube is not a problem; the bike is designed around flat bars like your trekking bar. You can always install a shorter stem if need be.

I have a pair of trekking bars that I plan on installing this summer. I picked up the bike last summer:

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Old 04-14-16, 07:27 AM
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Originally Posted by xybaby
I have a trekking bar so it will be an easy change.
Do you think the geometry is good? I saw people complain about the long top tube. Do you see that an issue? I really like short top tube for long distance touring.
If you like a short top tube, then a long top tube may not be for you. Everyone's fit is different.
A stem swap is always an option if the reach is too long. A shorter stem will often solve that issue. Also, trekking bars are set up where the hands are actually in front of the stem clamp, which effectively shortens the reach.
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Old 04-16-16, 02:19 AM
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Or you could use swept back bars in the North Road style or moustache bars.
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Old 04-16-16, 03:08 AM
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The trekking bars will pull the controls closer to you. In fact you usually need a longer stem so the rear free ends aren't behind the steerer axis, that feels weird. Angle them down, then the front hand position becomes your stretched out down out of the wind position.
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Old 04-18-16, 10:19 PM
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Here's my Trek 970.
you couldnt pay me to tour on it.
Well.... if the price was right.

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Old 04-18-16, 11:04 PM
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Why in particular, or is it that you already own several touring bikes?

I'm just wondering if your opinion would change if that was all you had.
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Old 04-19-16, 07:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Happy Feet
Why in particular, or is it that you already own several touring bikes?

I'm just wondering if your opinion would change if that was all you had.

Just looked at the image. That appears to be a bicycle designed for RACING not TOURING. Look at how close the wheels are to the frame. If you were to mount panniers they'd have to ve quite small in order not to get in the way of your pedalling. Long distance touring? How much gear are you planning to take? Are you going to camp or stay in hotels/motels/bed&breakfast? What sort of roads will you be riding on? A more relaxed frame geometry will soak up road shock better and a different frame will allow you to mount fenders for the times when it rains. How far do you want to ride each day?

If I had NOT bought the bicycle yet and was considering long distance touring I look for a bicycle a lot better suited for that.

Cheers
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Old 04-19-16, 07:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Miele Man
Just looked at the image. That appears to be a bicycle designed for RACING not TOURING. Look at how close the wheels are to the frame. If you were to mount panniers they'd have to ve quite small in order not to get in the way of your pedalling. Long distance touring? How much gear are you planning to take? Are you going to camp or stay in hotels/motels/bed&breakfast? What sort of roads will you be riding on? A more relaxed frame geometry will soak up road shock better and a different frame will allow you to mount fenders for the times when it rains. How far do you want to ride each day?

If I had NOT bought the bicycle yet and was considering long distance touring I look for a bicycle a lot better suited for that.

Cheers
The OP is talking about a vintage Trek 970 mountain bike with pretty nice geometry for touring not the vintage trek 970 racing bike in post no. 10. The 970 mtb was at the top of the heap for Trek mountain bikes for a few years. A picture of my Trek 950 mtb is in post no. 6.
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Old 04-19-16, 08:22 AM
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I was just asking Dgo for more clarification so it might be more helpful to the OP. Your observations are along that line.

I didn't know there were both mtb and road versions. I'm off to google land to see!
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Old 04-19-16, 08:27 AM
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We see people touring on road bikes , like riding it all day for a week , sleeping somewhere but home?

You're Touring..

Street tire MTB, is fine too .

Tour is a thing you do , a bike is what you do it on.
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