Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Wheel recommendation for touring?

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Wheel recommendation for touring?

Old 05-26-16, 05:50 AM
  #26  
Full Member
 
hfbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: High Falls NY
Posts: 202

Bikes: Trek 520, Haro Flightline 29er MTB

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 69 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 9 Posts
I use Sun Rhyno-Lite rims, Deore LX Hubs, and 35mm Schwabe Marathons on my 1994 Trek 520 and they've served me very well. For what it's worth I recently upgraded the Groupset to Deore XT. I had 42 mm Continental Top Contact tires, but when I switched to the 35 mm Marathons, I noticed an improvement of about 8% off my previous times and about 2 mph faster avg speed on the 40-50 mile trips that I regularly do. I bought the bike new 22 years ago and I just keep rebuilding it every 5 years or so. After my last upgrade, the bike is in the best shape it's ever been in.

Last edited by hfbill; 05-28-16 at 07:21 AM.
hfbill is offline  
Old 05-26-16, 06:13 AM
  #27  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Golden, CO and Tucson, AZ
Posts: 2,859

Bikes: 2012 Specialized Elite Disc, 1983 Trek 520

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 683 Post(s)
Liked 788 Times in 443 Posts
Originally Posted by BlarneyHammer
Also have some backpacking background (100% of AT, ~25% of PCT), but more in bike touring.

...I'm not a big guy (135 pounds) and I pack relatively light. Maybe 36 spokes is better for a guy who weighs 180 pounds and brings 50 pounds of gear for a total of 230, compared to my 135 + 30 = 165 total. There are plenty of guys that weigh more than 165 pounds on their own, riding carbon road bikes with 16 spokes on the wheel. I feel like 32 is plenty.
32 front, 36 rear would be an excellent compromise.
I'm with you on lighter wheels for lighter loads. Since you hike, you probably hear the debates about boots vs. running shoes, and heavy pack vs ultralight. I think bike wheels might have some analogs in those debates.
andrewclaus is offline  
Old 05-26-16, 07:27 AM
  #28  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 6,280

Bikes: 78 Masi Criterium, 68 PX10, 2016 Mercian King of Mercia, Rivendell Clem Smith Jr

Mentioned: 120 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2317 Post(s)
Liked 600 Times in 433 Posts
Originally Posted by milofilo
How do I tell the spacing? I measured roughly and the front spacing between forks is around 4.25 inches, the back is wider, almost 6 inches (dont have a ruler with millimeters). Is there a more official way to find this out?
It's the space between the dropouts that you need to measure. That is to say, the inside width. A vernier caliper is by far the best tool, but you should be able to do it with a ruler. Not to put to fine a point on it, but your measurement skills are terrible. Work on it. You need accuracy to 1/32" at least, not 'around' 1/4" or whatever. Better to buy or borrow a better measuring device and measure in mm. If you aren't comfortable with it, take it to a bike shop and pay them to do it. Oh, and take the wheels off before you measure.

It's almost certainly 100mm in front (standard) and 135mm in back. However 1994 was a transitional time, and there is a very slight chance the rear hub is 130mm. (they made both 130 and 135)

So, if you buy from velomine, most in that size would be listed under 29'er wheels. (mountain bike 700c) Problem is these are mostly sold to MTB'ers, and these days that means disc brake hubs. You want regular quick release hubs. Rims will be a bit on the heavy side, but that's ok for touring.

Velomine's website is kind of screwed up right now, you might have to do a search and or email them. Or try Amazon, etc, one of the vendors that sells through amazon drop ships wheels from Velomine.

Last edited by Salamandrine; 05-26-16 at 07:36 AM.
Salamandrine is offline  
Old 05-26-16, 08:22 AM
  #29  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,360 Times in 866 Posts
Can you point me to something that will explain what you mean by "ratio-range matters more than speeds"? I am not sure I follow...
Speeds /Vitesses is just how many Cogs are stacked up on your rear wheel.. a hardware count.

gear ratios is Math .. Numbers.. tooth counts , how many times does your rear wheel turn for every time the crank goes around once .

and that multiplied by how big your wheel is.

like forty two is twice 21, so a 42 chain ring and a 21 rear cog 42:21=2:1 ratio wheel turns twice .. 26" wheel? ...

not good at multiplication or division, with a calculator ?

People wrote programs to do the heavy lifting for you, such as Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Gear Calculator

Last edited by fietsbob; 05-26-16 at 08:27 AM.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 05-26-16, 09:13 AM
  #30  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 150
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by milofilo
Can you point me to something that will explain what you mean by "ratio-range matters more than speeds"? I am not sure I follow...
The range of gear ratios (i.e., the difference between the highest and lowest gears) determines the minimum and maximum speeds you can travel while pedaling at a reasonable cadence. A large range, such as found on a mountain bike with a triple crankset, will let you have gears suitable for climbing steep hills as well as ones suitable for high-speed downhills.

The number of speeds (or number of gears) determines how smoothly you can transition between different speeds -- if you had some hypothetical two-speed setup with a mountain-bike-like range, for example, your problem would be that the bike would be great at climbing a steep hill or speeding down a steep hill, but terrible at everything in between. In contrast, a 21-speed mountain bike (3x front * 7x rear gears) let you have a good gear for steep uphill, slightly-less-steep uphill, moderate uphill, gentle uphill, flat, slight downhill, etc.

Bikes have been getting more and more gears over the past few decades (they're up to 11 rear gears now, which combined with a triple crank would be 33 speeds). This IMO is mostly marketing-driven (Shimano wants you to "upgrade") but I suppose also has some benefits for racers who really care a lot about keeping the variation in their cadence to a minimum.

-----

For touring, I think 2x7 or 3x7 gearing is more than sufficient.

As far as wheels go, I think the rear wheel you already have is just fine and you should just get a front wheel of similar age and component style, as long as it's in good condition. It's your ridiculous handlbar/shifter combination that you need to worry about!
mrchaotica is offline  
Old 05-26-16, 02:11 PM
  #31  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Pearland, Texas
Posts: 7,579

Bikes: Cannondale, Trek, Raleigh, Santana

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 308 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
milofilo, I forgot to mention the handle bar situation! It just looks dangerous to me and I suggest you find a set of drop bars (road bike style). As with many other bicycle specs, there's a size requirement. The center section which is clamped by the stem must match the stem and the width of the handle bars should be about the distance between the two bony bumps atop your shoulders (somebody knows what the bones are called ).

Brad
bradtx is offline  
Old 05-26-16, 08:39 PM
  #32  
Senior Member
 
BlarneyHammer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 276

Bikes: Invictus, Valeria, Jackie, and Vanguard

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 92 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by andrewclaus
I'm with you on lighter wheels for lighter loads. Since you hike, you probably hear the debates about boots vs. running shoes, and heavy pack vs ultralight. I think bike wheels might have some analogs in those debates.
Correct. I'm on the trail running shoes side of the debate (maybe because I'm also a trail runner), and a typical backpacking base weight (including shoes, trekking poles, everything but food and water) is ~18 pounds. Light, but not ultralight. My approach to bike touring also reflects this.
BlarneyHammer is offline  
Old 05-26-16, 09:23 PM
  #33  
Banned.
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 2,077
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 760 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by bradtx
milofilo, I forgot to mention the handle bar situation! It just looks dangerous to me and I suggest you find a set of drop bars (road bike style). As with many other bicycle specs, there's a size requirement. The center section which is clamped by the stem must match the stem and the width of the handle bars should be about the distance between the two bony bumps atop your shoulders (somebody knows what the bones are called ).

Brad
Acromion process. A very interesting bit of human anatomy. I'm surprised it doesn't break off more than it does. Google it if you like.
Squeezebox is offline  
Old 05-26-16, 09:38 PM
  #34  
Banned.
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 2,077
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 760 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Oh!! don't go for more than 24 spokes!!!

Sorry folks couldn't pass the chance for a jab.
32 or 36 should do you well. You're probably not fat, nor carrying extra stuff.
You've got a solid inexpensive bicycle, match the wheels.
Save the 1K$ wheels for the 4K$ bicycle. If you ever decide to go there.
Squeezebox is offline  
Old 05-27-16, 12:08 AM
  #35  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 2,441
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Why you must run wider tires on your road bike


I have heard some industry people saying the new normal on road bikes is actually tipping towards 28. That is racing gods, little fellas, superbly fit. And yet some in the touring crowd still thinks they are doing something cool running 28s. I run 35s, and that is probably a mistake.
MassiveD is offline  
Old 05-27-16, 12:19 AM
  #36  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 2,441
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
3x7, is actually what is on the bike I have currently reduced to. I have one in build that will be 3x9, though I prefer 3x8. I think 3x8 is the sweet spot of lots of gears (particularly if you get a touring cassette), and rugged cheap components. 3x9 starts to get fussy and expensive, and it just gets sillier from there on, but nothing wrong with rich people's problems if you want them.

On the other side, Rohloff with solid 13 gears properly spaced, is highly regarded in some circles. Even with the overlaps you don't need 33 gears to match the 13 on Rohloff using a derailleur system. But the gearheads that praise Rohloff seem equally taken with high gear numbers or derailleur bikes.

What I prefer to avoid is getting new hubs designed around high gear cassettes, and then running say an 8 on them. Just makes for an necessarily stressed wheel.

Another thing I feel strongly about for myself is if I am running a lot of gears, I need a really great shift system so that I can shift like a squirrel on crack . No point in a million gears and tube shifters, needs to be something more modern if rolling that way on the gears.

Build a balanced system, then just forget about it.
MassiveD is offline  
Old 05-27-16, 05:16 AM
  #37  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Golden, CO and Tucson, AZ
Posts: 2,859

Bikes: 2012 Specialized Elite Disc, 1983 Trek 520

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 683 Post(s)
Liked 788 Times in 443 Posts
Originally Posted by MassiveD
Why you must run wider tires on your road bike


I have heard some industry people saying the new normal on road bikes is actually tipping towards 28. That is racing gods, little fellas, superbly fit. And yet some in the touring crowd still thinks they are doing something cool running 28s. I run 35s, and that is probably a mistake.
I've been interested in this issue and have started changing slowly, 23 to 25 on my road tires. (One reason is tire life.) But...it'll be interesting to see if the wider tire idea catches on. So far, around here, (and there are a LOT of cyclists around here, some very serious climbers among them) I haven't seen much of a change to 28s. Like you say, "some industry people..." It'll be interesting to see what happens on the street. Comfort and rolling resistance might be at odds with overall weight at some point, for some cyclists, for instance. Fat bikes are still a niche--that's another interesting trend that will be interesting to watch. Thanks for the link.
andrewclaus is offline  
Old 05-27-16, 05:29 AM
  #38  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Golden, CO and Tucson, AZ
Posts: 2,859

Bikes: 2012 Specialized Elite Disc, 1983 Trek 520

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 683 Post(s)
Liked 788 Times in 443 Posts
Originally Posted by MassiveD
...What I prefer to avoid is getting new hubs designed around high gear cassettes, and then running say an 8 on them. Just makes for an necessarily stressed wheel....
Great advice in your post. I had to chuckle at this paragraph, because I just salvaged a very nice rear wheel with a 10-speed, and found out an 8 speed cassette fits it perfectly, no spacers, uses the same chain as my 7 speed. I'm thinking of using it with a friction shifter, since I don't have an indexed 8. I could get a 4.5 mm spacer and put my 7 speed cassette on, but I agree, that would be a little too "stressful."

It is a very light wheel so I won't use it touring (30 spokes; 10 radial NDS, 20 3-cross DS), but it sure feels nice as a sportier wheel around town. And it was free!
andrewclaus is offline  
Old 05-27-16, 06:51 AM
  #39  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 49

Bikes: Trek 520 1994, Specialized Allez 2001

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Hmm cool. That is a very compelling argument to me... Hiked CDT and 80% of PCT in zero drop shoes. Will look into gatorskins.
milofilo is offline  
Old 05-27-16, 07:18 AM
  #40  
Senior Member
 
clasher's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Kitchener, ON
Posts: 2,738
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 229 Post(s)
Liked 148 Times in 103 Posts
I really would check out a highly rated local bike shop, they can tell you a lot by looking at the bike.

The best option in my opinion would be to pay a good wheelbuilder (gotta be a few in Chicago) to rebuilt the rear wheel around a new rim unless that wheelbuilder checks your old wheel and says it's up to snuff for touring still. If it's the original wheel it might just need new bearings and grease as well a quick check to make sure the spokes aren't seized. If they are then I'd recommend a new wheel built around the existing hub. You can then match the rims of a prebuilt front wheel with stainless spokes; something like a sun CR18 rim would be a good choice. I toured on them and they are a great value. Sticking with the 7 speed hub that is on the bike makes for a stronger wheel and I agree also with the person that suggested a 13-34 cassette, it'll work well with your current crankset.

When you're at the local shop pick up some drop bars and get those shifters/brake levers back onto the kinds of bars they are made for, it'll also be more comfortable. It might also be worth changing the bottom bracket bearings to a cartridge unit if they need servicing, as well changing the cables and housing if anything feels sticky or is showing signs of wear or damage... hard to assess these things from a picture.

I highly recommend using the widest tires your frame will take, wider tires are more comfortable and tend to flat less since pinch flats are harder to get. I have moved away from schwalbe marathons and onto the more supple tires that are lighter and quicker, even for touring I don't mind fixing flat or two and I enjoy the increased speed and comfort that the wide supple tires bring. If you don't like fixing flats or want to avoid the hassle the marathon supremes are much nicer to ride that the standard marathons and not all that slow.
clasher is offline  
Old 05-27-16, 09:44 AM
  #41  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Pearland, Texas
Posts: 7,579

Bikes: Cannondale, Trek, Raleigh, Santana

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 308 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by clasher
I really would check out a highly rated local bike shop, they can tell you a lot by looking at the bike....
This maybe the best advice. There have been a lot of fine points expressed that can wait until the bike is a safe and dependable roller.

Case in point, my beater bike. It's a very high mileage touring bike that saw little maintenance or TLC. The rims look horrible, but after testing show to be sound enough for me to cancel the purchase another wheel set. A good mechanic can save money for you in the long run.

Brad
bradtx is offline  
Old 05-28-16, 06:13 AM
  #42  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Coimbra, Portugal
Posts: 969

Bikes: More bicycles than I can ride at one time: 2 custom made tourers, a Brompton 6-speed, and an Indian-made roadster.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 132 Post(s)
Liked 18 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by fietsbob
rebuild the wheel with a new rim of your preference, and overhaul the hub .. Flush & re-oil the driver

..............
I toured on a 48 rear , 40 front, 88 spoke pair of wheels I built myself , fortunately I never damaged a rim..
(Only 1 spoke in 10 years..)
.........

IN SHORT : ride what you have , bring Money.. if you get them damaged Buy something else along the way.
About 10 years I had a custom built touring bike built in "expedition grade". Steel, and heavy with racks made of steel aircraft-grade steel tubing. It has stood the test of time in 3 different tours across different parts of outback Australia.

The wheels are built using 48 spoke PW hubs and Rhyno-Lite rims. Very strong wheels and they have certainly survived several mis-adventures and stayed quite true - even 10 years later. Schwalbe Marathon tyres are good - but they must be inflated to 65 psi to keep them going....

i always had a backup plan and cash to deal with issues. fortunately they were minimal
tmac100 is offline  
Old 06-04-16, 01:00 PM
  #43  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 49

Bikes: Trek 520 1994, Specialized Allez 2001

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by andrewclaus
now use Conti Gatorskins. I really enjoyed the light wheels and skinny tires with a light load (but I ride almost all pavement).
Hey fellow thru hiker! Do you use the folding or wire bead version of gatorskins? Does it matter which I get?
milofilo is offline  
Old 06-04-16, 02:18 PM
  #44  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Golden, CO and Tucson, AZ
Posts: 2,859

Bikes: 2012 Specialized Elite Disc, 1983 Trek 520

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 683 Post(s)
Liked 788 Times in 443 Posts
Originally Posted by milofilo
Hey fellow thru hiker! Do you use the folding or wire bead version of gatorskins? Does it matter which I get?
From one hiker trash to another; I think the only reason to buy a folding tire is if you're going to carry a spare. Riding on high quality tires in a developed nation, I don't see the need. I use wire bead.
andrewclaus is offline  
Old 06-04-16, 02:21 PM
  #45  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 49

Bikes: Trek 520 1994, Specialized Allez 2001

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by andrewclaus
From one hiker trash to another; I think the only reason to buy a folding tire is if you're going to carry a spare. Riding on high quality tires in a developed nation, I don't see the need. I use wire bead.
haha thanks!
milofilo is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
milofilo
Touring
7
05-31-16 12:46 PM
L0NE_W0LF
Touring
42
03-10-15 12:19 AM
mstateglfr
Bicycle Mechanics
11
01-21-15 11:02 PM
lucky1976
Touring
16
10-09-11 05:29 PM
monkeyonabike
Touring
4
05-04-10 06:58 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.