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Who here likes Carradice bags?

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Who here likes Carradice bags?

Old 08-20-16, 04:41 PM
  #1  
mdilthey
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Who here likes Carradice bags?

Hey all,

I just purchased a Swift Industries Zeitgeist and a Carradice Bagman Sport rack. The Sport rack fits my bike like a glove, and I'm getting excited to try out the Zeitgeist when it arrives in a few weeks. This will be my first Carradice-style bag.

Who here enjoys this style of bike touring bag? What kind of stuff do you find yourself putting in a bag like this? Is sway, tire dirt/wear, or imbalance an issue, and are there any interesting idiosyncrasies that you've found when using a Carradice bag?

Maybe this is wishful thinking, but anyone else using theirs off-road that can share comments?

Thanks!
Max

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Old 08-20-16, 05:30 PM
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Just a fine point here, but Swift bags are not Carradice bags. So I cannot offer any opinions on Swift bags.

However, any sway issues would be solved with the Bagman support.

Other than that, I like the two different sizes of real Carradice bags I have, and hope to add to the collection with the smallest and the largest which is a Camper Longflap that, along with a decent-sized handlebar bag, I think would be capable of sustaining more than an overnight summer camping tour with small tent. I already have the Nelson Longflap and that has been useful in conjunction with two panniers.

The Carradice bags are waterproof if care is taken to do up the flaps properly, they don't seem affected by mud -- there is a reinforced panel on the underside the take care of wear on racks and as added protection -- and they do what I need them to do.
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Old 08-20-16, 05:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
Just a fine point here, but Swift bags are not Carradice bags. So I cannot offer any opinions on Swift bags.
Oh yeah, of course. I definitely think both are well-made (lots of happy users for both companies) and I definitely think the Zeitgeist is modeled directly after the Carradice Longflap. The Carradice is more common on this forum, so I figured I could get Swift questions answered by using Carradice as a proxy.
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Old 08-20-16, 05:50 PM
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Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
Who here enjoys this style of bike touring bag?
I've used British seatbags for > 40 years, including Carradice.
They meet my requirements in capacity, convenience and durability.
The simple steel '50's design Miller & "modern" Caradice Bagman II QR supports both work a treat.

A Classic design that suits my needs.
Just got a 70's seatbag back from the saddle/tack shop for repair, good for another few decades of use.


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Old 08-20-16, 05:51 PM
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$159 for a bag that hold 8.5L of gear?

Meanwhile, an actual Carradice Nelson longflap holds 18L of gear and costs $105.

Cant say i will ever find myself hankerin to drop $160 to get 8.5L of gear storage.
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Old 08-20-16, 05:54 PM
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
$159 for a bag that hold 8.5L of gear?

Meanwhile, an actual Carradice Nelson longflap holds 18L of gear and costs $105.

Cant say i will ever find myself hankerin to drop $160 to get 8.5L of gear storage.
I totally get that. The way I see it, I'm spending $105 on the bag, and a $50 premium to have it hand-made in the USA by an honest designer/craftsperson. Kind of like a specialty item. I willingly pay the premium, as I did when I bought a nicer bike than the $800 base model that would have done the same job.

Also, the size I got holds 11L of gear plus overflow in the side pockets and under the flap!
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Old 08-20-16, 07:46 PM
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My Nelson Longflap sits directly on my panniers and attaches to the saddle. I do not use the support you are talking about, so I can't comment on that. I run one strap around the seatpost too.

When I did the Pacific Coast, the pocket on one side had my spare tubes and patch kit, the pocket on the other side had granola bars and snacks. The inside of the bag on that trip was used for food and drink which varied from nearly empty to overflowing, depending on how recently we were at the grocery store. Unfortunately my touring partner was trying to do the ultra light thing so he only had maybe one or two liters of spare room in his panniers so I usually had to carry most of the food.

The 1.5 liter wine bottles fit, but they certainly take a lot of room as you can see in the first photo.

I put some cardboard in it to act as a stiffener. On another forum it was suggested that Corroplast (spell?) works better, but the cardboard was sufficient for that trip and it did not get wet in the rain. If I find a Corroplast source, I plan to try that.

I also had some toe clip straps on the top of it, sometimes I would use one of those straps to lash down an article of clothing when I was shedding layers during the day.
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Old 08-20-16, 07:56 PM
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I also have the Carradice Pendle, used it on a mountain biking trip when I was pretending that my expedition bike was a mountain bike. That hung from my saddle with two straps and one strap around the seatpost.

This was a supported trip, a 4X4 pickup hauled our camping gear, food and water for us for four days. Thus the bag was just extra clothing, extra water and lunch, so it was pretty lightly packed.
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Old 08-20-16, 08:20 PM
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Thanks Tourist in MSN. It seems so totally obvious now, but I have been trying to work out an effective way of using those loop holes on the top of my Pendle for extra stuff (such as holding a jacket) on randonnees, and you've just solved it with the leather straps!
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Old 08-20-16, 08:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
using those loop holes on the top of my Pendle for extra stuff (such as holding a jacket) on randonnees, and you've just solved it with the leather straps!
Yep, stowing rain gear for quick retrieval on the top flap w/ sturdy D-rings and positive retention straps (and re-stowing when soaking wet w/o affecting what's inside the main C-dice compartment) was/is a key feature of the British design. It seems that operating a bicycle in a variable climate and fiddling about w/ wet weather kit as conditions changed while carrying a load that needed protection from the elements was figured out in the 1930s.

How odd.

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Old 08-20-16, 08:47 PM
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Who here likes Carradice bags?

I am a big fan of Carrandice bags.

I've got the Nelson Longflap, the Pendle (in green), and the Barley.

Lately, I have been thinking about getting another ... perhaps a black Pendle, although I would kind of like something in between the size of the Nelson Longflap and Pendle. I used the Nelson Longflap on a ride last weekend and I think it was just a bit big. On all my long training rides lately, I've been using the Pendle, and it worked well for those rides ... but for event rides, I'd like just a bit more room.






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Old 08-20-16, 09:10 PM
  #12  
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I use the Carradice Camper Longflap (23L) for all my touring and the Barley for day and overnight CC trips.
I don't use a support as I have sufficient clearance between the saddle and back tire. I just strap the bag onto my Brooks Swift and around the seat post. This is how Carradice saddlebags were originally designed to be used.

Dirt is an issue, particularly in the rain and I often get a nice stripe down the top of the bag when I'm on a fire trail or limestone.

I use mine to carry all my camping gear and clothes and the side pockets are great for spare tires, tools and first aid kit. I also sewed on a couple of D rings so I can attach a shoulder strap, but I find myself mostly just using the nylon straps that I have attached to the top flap as a handle.

With the Longflap you can carry an extra 10L of volume and jackets can be easily strapped to the top flap too. It's very versatile and can fit on a plane or train as hand luggage.

Here is my packing list for the Camper Longflap and a picture of my Carradice on my bike. You can see my grey jacket strapped to the top as it was cold in the morning. It usually gets packed inside the bag.

Riding with a full saddlebag isn't that different from riding the bike without it because the weight is so close to the center of gravity of the bike and I can climb easily out of the saddle. However, if you have to pick the bike up it takes a while to get used to the weight distribution.

https://wheelsofchance.wordpress.com.../25/gear-list/


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Old 08-20-16, 10:44 PM
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Thanks for all the great pictures and the advice. I'm already thrilled about stowing rain gear on the outside of the flap, and the coroplast idea is good too. Glad I started this thread!
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Old 08-21-16, 08:53 AM
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Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
Thanks for all the great pictures and the advice. I'm already thrilled about stowing rain gear on the outside of the flap, and the coroplast idea is good too. Glad I started this thread!
If I recall correctly you sometimes use frontroller or backroller panniers. I prefer my rain gear under a frontroller strap where it is also very handy. In the photo, the red on the right front roller (left side in photo) is my rain jacket, on the left side the black roll is the rain pants and the small light green item next to the rain pants are the shoe covers. Being on the front, I can always see them, so if they start to come loose I can fix that before I loose them.


Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
Thanks Tourist in MSN. It seems so totally obvious now, but I have been trying to work out an effective way of using those loop holes on the top of my Pendle for extra stuff (such as holding a jacket) on randonnees, and you've just solved it with the leather straps!
If toe clip straps are too short, you just need another pair of toe clip straps to make them longer. Quite frankly I used the white toe clip straps for the aesthetics, a nylon strap on a Carradice with all that leather did not look right.
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Old 08-21-16, 09:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
If I recall correctly you sometimes use frontroller or backroller panniers. I prefer my rain gear under a frontroller strap where it is also very handy. In the photo, the red on the right front roller (left side in photo) is my rain jacket, on the left side the black roll is the rain pants and the small light green item next to the rain pants are the shoe covers. Being on the front, I can always see them, so if they start to come loose I can fix that before I loose them.

I love the Front Roller's straps. I keep my sleeping pad and shoes under them. Rain gear i another great idea.

Unfortunately, the Swift is replacing the front-rollers for most of my touring, I think!
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Old 08-21-16, 10:13 AM
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I own& use 3 .. different models..
*Carradura , included its own rack Fixed to the seat post bolt on the frame. bag has pocket to slip over the rack..

* Super C, sits on top of my Tubus [replaces a Karrimor that saw too much sun (Red Nylon fabric)]

+ Classic, green Camper Long flap on a SQR mount attached to my Brompton seat post..

Now, none are fixed to Brooks saddles .
[ 2 use my Minoura double waterbottle cage holder kludge, with P clips around Dowel in bag.]


happy shopping..



./.

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Old 08-21-16, 10:19 AM
  #17  
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
a nylon strap on a Carradice with all that leather did not look right.
Agree, I've used nylon straps w/ fastex fastners on my Barley for raingear on the top flap, they work but look "wrong".
The local saddle/tack shop is going to make a more "proper" set of leather straps for this Autumn's trip.

Style points are worth something......

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Old 08-21-16, 01:08 PM
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Originally Posted by nun View Post
I use the Carradice Camper Longflap (23L) for all my touring and the Barley for day and overnight CC trips.
I don't use a support as I have sufficient clearance between the saddle and back tire. I just strap the bag onto my Brooks Swift and around the seat post. This is how Carradice saddlebags were originally designed to be used.

Dirt is an issue, particularly in the rain and I often get a nice stripe down the top of the bag when I'm on a fire trail or limestone.

I use mine to carry all my camping gear and clothes and the side pockets are great for spare tires, tools and first aid kit. I also sewed on a couple of D rings so I can attach a shoulder strap, but I find myself mostly just using the nylon straps that I have attached to the top flap as a handle.

With the Longflap you can carry an extra 10L of volume and jackets can be easily strapped to the top flap too. It's very versatile and can fit on a plane or train as hand luggage.

Here is my packing list for the Camper Longflap and a picture of my Carradice on my bike. You can see my grey jacket strapped to the top as it was cold in the morning. It usually gets packed inside the bag.

Riding with a full saddlebag isn't that different from riding the bike without it because the weight is so close to the center of gravity of the bike and I can climb easily out of the saddle. However, if you have to pick the bike up it takes a while to get used to the weight distribution.

https://wheelsofchance.wordpress.com.../25/gear-list/

fantasti blog nun you have this lightweight touring down to a fine art..
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Old 08-21-16, 07:18 PM
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I've been using the Carradice Super-C 23 liter Saddlebag for my commute gear for the last 3 years. Along with the bagman support, but the stays that run from the support down to the bike frame, I stopped using. When the bagman support was rigidly fixed to my seatpost ( with their bolt-on seatpost collar) it did feel like it transferred the sway of the bag up through my seat. Having done away with those stays, I have zero complaints. It has only gotten better with age. I did stitch-rip the logo patch off for aesthetic purposes. Also, the SuperC line skips the leather straps & metal buckles in favor of modern webbing & fastex buckles- easier to operate in cold weather & easier to repair in the field. 23 liter capacity holds everything I've needed to carry & then some. For trail rides or desolate roads, I use the flap-top rings to attach my helmet there. The other Super C bags I have, have not been tested on enough trips for me to speak of in much detail. Overall, I recommend it.
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Old 08-22-16, 04:52 AM
  #20  
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I have a Carradice and a Zimbale, a South Korean copy of a long flap. The reason I bought the Zimbale was that I wanted a larger bag and the dealer was having trouble getting new Carradices. The canvas isn't as thick as the Carradice, and the black has faded to grey. The Carradice remains black even though it is twice as old. The reflective triangle on the Carradice is still reflective, but the one on the Zimbale has lost its reflectivity. Both seem to be still waterproof.
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Old 08-22-16, 06:46 AM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post

I put some cardboard in it to act as a stiffener. On another forum it was suggested that Corroplast (spell?) works better, but the cardboard was sufficient for that trip and it did not get wet in the rain. If I find a Corroplast source, I plan to try that.
There's a great coroplast source called "election campaign signs." Wait until the day after election day and you can get coroplast for free.

I have a Carradice Barley. I like it, but sometimes I wish it had snaps instead of buckles.
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Old 08-22-16, 12:23 PM
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Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
Hey all,

I just purchased a Swift Industries Zeitgeist and a Carradice Bagman Sport rack. The Sport rack fits my bike like a glove, and I'm getting excited to try out the Zeitgeist when it arrives in a few weeks. This will be my first Carradice-style bag.

Who here enjoys this style of bike touring bag? What kind of stuff do you find yourself putting in a bag like this? Is sway, tire dirt/wear, or imbalance an issue, and are there any interesting idiosyncrasies that you've found when using a Carradice bag?

Maybe this is wishful thinking, but anyone else using theirs off-road that can share comments?

Thanks!
Max

class looking bags MAX .i have the carradice longflap excellent and barley also excellent. but you do need the expedition rack for both bags just to keep them steady on the bike someone mentioned cardboard to stiffen them up i tried that didn't work the rack done the trick.
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Old 08-22-16, 02:12 PM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by antokelly View Post
class looking bags MAX .i have the carradice longflap excellent and barley also excellent. but you do need the expedition rack for both bags just to keep them steady on the bike someone mentioned cardboard to stiffen them up i tried that didn't work the rack done the trick.
The stability of the bags is a function of how tightly they are packed. With the Barley sway and stability isn't a big issue because it's quite small. However, with something like a Camper Longflap if it isn't tightly packed, ie full, it will sag downwards from the saddle. This isn't a big issue if you are using a Bagman and the third strap is buckled around the Bagman, but if you aren't using any support and just buckling to the seatpost the saddlebag can droop down onto the back tire which is not good. I should point out now that the bag should be as close to the saddle as possible to eliminate sway and that the buckles of the straps going through the saddle loops must be buckled on the inside of the bag....NOT the outside. So Rivendell get this completely wrong.....you should not see the buckles.

Sackville SaddleSack Medium - Olive - 20132

But Peter White gets it right....scroll down to "Mounting a Saddlenbag"

Carradice

My Camper is tightly packed and so makes a nice solid cylinder. The saddle loop buckles are on the inside of the bag and I do them up tightly so that the bag is tight against the saddle to minimize sway. Then the third strap is buckled tightly against the seatpost. This leaves a couple of centimeters between the bottom of the Camper and the back tire and I get minimal sway bacuase there is little play in the three mounting points.
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Old 08-23-16, 01:38 AM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by nun View Post
The stability of the bags is a function of how tightly they are packed. With the Barley sway and stability isn't a big issue because it's quite small. However, with something like a Camper Longflap if it isn't tightly packed, ie full, it will sag downwards from the saddle. This isn't a big issue if you are using a Bagman and the third strap is buckled around the Bagman, but if you aren't using any support and just buckling to the seatpost the saddlebag can droop down onto the back tire which is not good. I should point out now that the bag should be as close to the saddle as possible to eliminate sway and that the buckles of the straps going through the saddle loops must be buckled on the inside of the bag....NOT the outside. So Rivendell get this completely wrong.....you should not see the buckles.

Sackville SaddleSack Medium - Olive - 20132

But Peter White gets it right....scroll down to "Mounting a Saddlenbag"

Carradice

My Camper is tightly packed and so makes a nice solid cylinder. The saddle loop buckles are on the inside of the bag and I do them up tightly so that the bag is tight against the saddle to minimize sway. Then the third strap is buckled tightly against the seatpost. This leaves a couple of centimeters between the bottom of the Camper and the back tire and I get minimal sway bacuase there is little play in the three mounting points.
One issue that can be annoying is the back of the thighs hitting the bag on each pedal stroke if you dont have a Bagman, or can't fit one.

I've fiddled around with this a couple of times, the last time was with the Bike Fridays in Canada. I got a few plastic pipe fittings -- including several Ts which subsequently had half the top piece cut off lengthways -- from Canadian Tyre and fashioned a spacer that attaches to the seat post with zipties, and the Carradice bag then either can rest against another T with the top cut off, or it can be held more firmly with a strap or zipties through the strap loop. It sounds a bit complicated than it really is, but works nicely to (a) keep the Carradice away from the thighs, (b) makes the Carradice a little easier to access and (c) stabilises the Carradice from forward and sideway movement.
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Old 08-23-16, 05:00 AM
  #25  
nun
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Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
One issue that can be annoying is the back of the thighs hitting the bag on each pedal stroke if you dont have a Bagman, or can't fit one.
I don't find this to be an issue at all and far prefer the simplicity of doing without the Bagman wherever possible.......you need sufficient saddle to tire clearance and so a Lowsaddle saddlebag might be useful.

https://www.carradice.co.uk/index.ph...&product_id=36
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