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Bikepacking Gear Recommendations?

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Bikepacking Gear Recommendations?

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Old 09-01-16, 05:02 PM
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lightspree
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Bikepacking Gear Recommendations?

Can you recommend bags and other gear that you have found to be good?

Any that you've found to be give-it-a-miss material would also be of interest.

Are there certain setups or configurations that you especially like, or have settled on? (Or ones that you have tried and found wanting in some way?) It would be great to see pictures from people here. Descriptions are fine too though.
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Old 09-01-16, 05:19 PM
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I'd say these cover everything:

Bikepacking Primer (Shout out/plug to Max here)
http://www.livestrong.com/article/10...ng-trend-prep/

Or this:

Bikepacking 101
http://www.bikepacking.com/bikepacking-101/

Both sites cover lots of gear, recommendations, etc. and compiled by people who regularly backpack and know their stuff.

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Old 09-01-16, 05:20 PM
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Revelate. Not cheap but good quality and excellent design. I have a frame bag from when they were called Epic Designs, a Viscacha, Tangle half-frame bag, gas tank, Sweetroll, and expediton pogies. Oh, and a mountain feed bag. All of it has stood up to use and abuse for years now.

And it is sewn in Anchorage, Alaska by people who actually ride and go bikepacking. If that matters to you.
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Old 09-01-16, 08:25 PM
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I really like the Revelate harness and bag, but I've found I can fit a bigger dry bag in the harness than the Revelate one if I need to. The Revelate bag is a good size, though, and still my preference.

There's a handlebar bag that attaches to the Revelate harness. I liked how easily it integrates with the harness, but it wasn't waterproof. Since I had to replace it, I got the Ortleib equivalent, which I really like. Doesn't integrate as well with Revelate, obviously, but I was able to rig something up to let it clip on and off easily. Haven't decided yet if my attachment method is secure enough for bouncing down some trails, but it's fine for the road. And it's made to velcro to handlebars, which seems pretty secure.

I also like the Revelate frame bag. Seems really sturdy.

I like the Salsa Anything cages. I'm just not sure they make more sense than a normal rack. Seems like a decent rack and mid-size bags could hold as much as a couple of Anything cages and a seat bag. I don't know if the weight difference would be noticeable. Still, I use them and like them, along with a rear rack, because I like moving my weight up front when I can, and I've been taking trips that have more camping than riding, which means I bring a little more gear, like a chair and a cooler. The chair goes in an Anything cage, the cooler takes the place of one pannier. Without those two items, I think I'd ditch the cages. Or I guess I could ditch the rack and just use a seat bag along with the cages. Anything Cages come as a metal frame or some tough, plastic material. I have one of each, and It think I prefer the plastic, but since I'm using two, it's nice to have one of each.

In addition, while I find the straps that come with the cage to be fine, I also picked up a Revelate set, which, I believe, are just ski straps. They have a little elasticity, which means I can pull them tight over a rigid load, and everything will stay put. The cloth straps have no give, so if your load has no give, there might be a little rattle.

I've tested none of this on actual bikepacking trips, just local camping trips. And the frame bag has been on my bike full time for a few months. I keep meaning to take it off when there's no trip imminent, but even for commuting it's handy.
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Old 09-01-16, 09:18 PM
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I like the Ortlieb panniers, they are truly the most water resistant pannier on the market, in fact they claim 100% waterproof, but a word of warning concerning stuff you want to make sure won't get wet...put that stuff into a ziplock bag just to be safe. I've never found any traces of water inside my Ortlieb panniers, but with electronics it's better safe than sorry. The fabric on these bags are very durable, I've had mine for about 3 years with no noticeable damage.

Yes Ortlieb are expensive but worth it, however if you're like thinking I'm nuts to wanting you spend that kind of money then get Ibera instead, but anything you don't want to get wet like clothes put in a ziplock bag like your electronics, because this bag isn't waterproof but it does say all weather.
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Old 09-02-16, 12:30 AM
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I went full Revelate Designs for my bags...mostly because they were cheaper than a lot of the other popular brands and I wanted everything to match.
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Old 09-02-16, 08:23 AM
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Originally Posted by FrozenK View Post
Revelate. Not cheap but good quality and excellent design. I have a frame bag from when they were called Epic Designs, a Viscacha, Tangle half-frame bag, gas tank, Sweetroll, and expediton pogies. Oh, and a mountain feed bag. All of it has stood up to use and abuse for years now.

And it is sewn in Anchorage, Alaska by people who actually ride and go bikepacking. If that matters to you.
+1...with the exception of the Sweetroll. And maybe the pogies. And maybe the feed bag. Personally, I haven't much use for the latter two. I find the Harness to be more useable than the Sweetroll. Same idea but the Harness has more flexibility.
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Old 09-02-16, 08:28 AM
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata View Post
I like the Ortlieb panniers, they are truly the most water resistant pannier on the market, in fact they claim 100% waterproof, but a word of warning concerning stuff you want to make sure won't get wet...put that stuff into a ziplock bag just to be safe. I've never found any traces of water inside my Ortlieb panniers, but with electronics it's better safe than sorry. The fabric on these bags are very durable, I've had mine for about 3 years with no noticeable damage.

Yes Ortlieb are expensive but worth it, however if you're like thinking I'm nuts to wanting you spend that kind of money then get Ibera instead, but anything you don't want to get wet like clothes put in a ziplock bag like your electronics, because this bag isn't waterproof but it does say all weather.
I would agree for road use but if the idea is to use bikepacking bags for what they were intended, i.e. carrying a load off-road, panniers have limitations that bikepacking bags solve. The bikepacking bags can be used on full-suspension bikes without racks and almost all (all?) full-suspension bikes can't be outfitted with racks.

Of course bikepacking bags have their own limitations in that they can't carry near the load that panniers will. Bikepacking is a more spartan way to travel and requires more sacrifices than is required even for road touring...which isn't exactly luxury travel.
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Old 09-02-16, 09:48 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
I would agree for road use but if the idea is to use bikepacking bags for what they were intended, i.e. carrying a load off-road, panniers have limitations that bikepacking bags solve. The bikepacking bags can be used on full-suspension bikes without racks and almost all (all?) full-suspension bikes can't be outfitted with racks.

Of course bikepacking bags have their own limitations in that they can't carry near the load that panniers will. Bikepacking is a more spartan way to travel and requires more sacrifices than is required even for road touring...which isn't exactly luxury travel.
I would think, at least from what I've read over the years about touring off road which I've never done, that using a single wheel BOB trailer would be better for a full suspension bike, at least in terms of being able to travel further by carrying a bit more stuff...unless the person is wanting to travel very rough trails where a trailer would just hang you back and hang you up. Anyway here is a guy that found a pannier system called Freeload rack that worked great on his full suspension bike: 3 Things I Learned From My First Mountain Bike Tour
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Old 09-02-16, 11:01 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
+1...with the exception of the Sweetroll. And maybe the pogies. And maybe the feed bag. Personally, I haven't much use for the latter two. I find the Harness to be more useable than the Sweetroll. Same idea but the Harness has more flexibility.
Pogies are only useful for those of us in northern latitudes. The mountain feed bag, I thought it was useless too until I tried one. It rock's for keeping food handy and accessible on a race.
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Old 09-02-16, 11:13 AM
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata View Post
I would think, at least from what I've read over the years about touring off road which I've never done, that using a single wheel BOB trailer would be better for a full suspension bike, at least in terms of being able to travel further by carrying a bit more stuff...unless the person is wanting to travel very rough trails where a trailer would just hang you back and hang you up. Anyway here is a guy that found a pannier system called Freeload rack that worked great on his full suspension bike: 3 Things I Learned From My First Mountain Bike Tour
It depends. I've used trailers off-road and I'm not a big fan. They are heavy and they can influence the handling negatively. On steep downhills, they tend to push up on the back of the bike while braking which is very disconcerting. You probably won't endo because the trailer is holding the back down but it sure feels like it and mountain bike riders try to avoid that going over the bars feeling as much as possible.

On uphills, the trailer weights down the rear wheel which makes riding up and over obstacles a bit harder. Then the trailer hits the obstacle and you can't really pop the trailer wheel over it so that hangs you up also. Even on moderate hills with only a few obstacles, a trailer could end up bogging you down and make you walk the hill.

Alls not great in Freeload land. It's a clever system to be sure but loading up the legs of the front shock and the stays of the rear suspension deaden the suspension a lot. Suspension works best where the ratio of sprung weight is high compared to unsprung weight. The problem with the Freeload is that reduces that ratio significantly by putting a lot of weight on the unsprung part. The suspension just doesn't move as freely as it should. Panniers are also wide which means you could hit them on the trail. Probably not good.

While the (by now) traditional bikepacking has some load limitations, it does make the bike ride more like it should. The load is narrow so you can ride single track. The load isn't as low as it could be but at least it doesn't interfere with the suspension system. And you aren't carrying around another wheel that gets in the way.

I have "bikepacked" off-road with racks and panniers (rigid bike), trailers (a couple of different varieties) and with Revelate bags. The Revelate are by far the better way to go.
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Old 09-02-16, 11:40 AM
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Here's a list of awesome frame bag makers to check out. I've personally tried gear from all of them and the quality was awesome.

Rogue Panda Designs
Revelate Designs
Oveja Negra
Swift Industries
Carsick Designs
Nuclear Sunrise Stitchworks
Porcelain Rocket

I would invest most heavily in the framebag. Getting it custom-fit to your bike will really maximize your storage space.

Second, I would recommend one of the new seat bags that include a drybag in a harness, like Revelate's Terrapin. This seems to be the best way of executing the seatbag because it's simple, waterproof, and if your bag rips you can just replace the drybag instead of the whole shebang.
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Old 09-02-16, 11:40 AM
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Originally Posted by NoShiftSherlock View Post
I'd say these cover everything:

Bikepacking Primer (Shout out/plug to Max here)
Why Bikepacking Is the Next Big Adventure Trend and How to Do It | LIVESTRONG.COM

Or this:

Bikepacking 101
Bikepacking 101 - BIKEPACKING.com

Both sites cover lots of gear, recommendations, etc. and compiled by people who regularly backpack and know their stuff.
Thanks! Logan at Bikepacking.com is awesome, and he has a post for just about everything. Definitely second spending some time over there.
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Old 09-02-16, 11:59 AM
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I bikepack, but mostly fire roads. I'm using front panniers in the rear on my rigid mtb. I prefer using small panniers in the rear over a large seatpack.
The only downside with using racks is that they always remain on your bike, for the most part.
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Old 09-02-16, 02:06 PM
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Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
Thanks! Logan at Bikepacking.com is awesome, and he has a post for just about everything. Definitely second spending some time over there.
It's my go-to. I also like that they cater to the DIY crowd
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Old 09-02-16, 03:02 PM
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Cyccommute That was good information, not that I would ever tour on a suspension bike, but for someone who might that was great info, thanks.

I do have a question, when you say putting a lot of weight on the unsprung part, not sure if I understand that. If a 200 pound person gets on a suspended bike doesn't the same thing happen? A big person is setting on the bike and compressing the springs, thus why would it matter if the weight, say 50 pounds of gear and 150 pound person, if the 50 pounds is attached to the frame vs attached to the rear suspended stay it's still 50 pounds pushing down on the bike as whole, yes the weight is attached to the stay but as the stay moves up and down so it must do the same thing with a 150 person on the seat plus the 50 pounds of gear or just a 200 pound person, both weight combos are still 200 pounds pushing down on the springs.

I'm a bit slow on this, I just don't see the difference.
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Old 09-02-16, 04:48 PM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
I've used trailers off-road and I'm not a big fan. They are heavy and they can influence the handling negatively.
Does this in any way lead to a cheap Topeak being available in the Denver area?

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Old 09-02-16, 06:26 PM
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Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
I bikepack, but mostly fire roads. I'm using front panniers in the rear on my rigid mtb. I prefer using small panniers in the rear over a large seatpack.
The only downside with using racks is that they always remain on your bike, for the most part.
Did this on my last bikepacking trip for some extra space for food. I didn't mind the rear rack and the panniers were strapped on tight... but the bike is much more fun with a seatbag because the weight in the back is less. In the future, I will try to lighten my kit so that I don't need the rack
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Old 09-02-16, 10:29 PM
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Some great recommendations, keep 'em coming.

Re sprung wt. vs unsprung: Try holding a five or ten pound weight in your hand, and move it up and down rapidly, mimicking the action of a wheel with extra weight attached when riding over washboard or other bumpy surfaces. Then try the same thing with a one pound weight.

I look forward to buying and trying out some of the recommended bikepacking gear, and I also want to get into DIY stuff. Any further recommendations of good sites for getting into making your own bikepacking gear would be great.

I can share something I've learned recently about sewing machines for DIY gear making. The usual recommendations are for older, all metal European machines (Necchis, Pfaffs, Elnas, Berninas, Vikings, etc.), or certain all metal older Singer models, like the 201.

What I have recently discovered is that Japanese-made machines from the 1950s (also some from the 40s and early 60s) are a much better recommendation, in many ways. These are great machines, widely available for a song on the used market. (Craigslist sometimes has decent deals. Ebay is a step in the more expensive direction, generally. And shipping is expensive and very dicey - shipping damage is common, because these heavy, all metal machines are difficult to package and protect properly. And they often get dropped somewhere along the line.)

Some of these will last a lifetime. People have used them in full-time sewing businesses, and they swear by them. They last and last, like good Toyotas (some were even made in the Toyota factory). Parts are often interchangeable and widely available. Some of them are absolutely beautiful as well.

Once you learn to recognize them, they are easy to spot. If you tilt the machines up and look underneath, you'll find the factory designation -- JA19 for example. These "JA" machines were made in Japanese factories.

Vintage sewing machine expert Ed Lamoureux has this to say about them: Next to Necchis, I feel that post WWII Japanese machines offer the highest quality machine to the sewist. They certainly offer the best value - thrift shops and local auctions sell perfectly good japanese machines from $5 to $35. Whenever anyone asks me for an expensive machine to actually use for sewing, I point them toward a 1960s Japanese machine. I even try to keep a couple around to sell so they don't need to find, clean, and adjust one in the wild.


I like the late 1950s machines; but some of the all metal early 60s machines are quite nice too. Some time in the 60s, plastic started showing up more and more in the machines. And plastic just doesn't last like good metal, especially in the internal gears and cams. The all metal units are much more reliable and long lasting.

Oftentimes all that's needed is some cleaning (a mild degreaser can help), fresh oil and a few dabs of fresh grease, and they are good to go.

Last edited by lightspree; 09-02-16 at 11:20 PM.
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Old 09-03-16, 07:28 AM
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Originally Posted by lightspree View Post
Some great recommendations, keep 'em coming.

Re sprung wt. vs unsprung: Try holding a five or ten pound weight in your hand, and move it up and down rapidly, mimicking the action of a wheel with extra weight attached when riding over washboard or other bumpy surfaces. Then try the same thing with a one pound weight.

I can share something I've learned recently about sewing machines for DIY gear making. The usual recommendations are for older, all metal European machines (Necchis, Pfaffs, Elnas, Berninas, Vikings, etc.), or certain all metal older Singer models, like the 201.

What I have recently discovered is that Japanese-made machines from the 1950s (also some from the 40s and early 60s) are a much better recommendation, in many ways. These are great machines, widely available for a song on the used market. (Craigslist sometimes has decent deals. Ebay is a step in the more expensive direction, generally. And shipping is expensive and very dicey - shipping damage is common, because these heavy, all metal machines are difficult to package and protect properly. And they often get dropped somewhere along the line.)

Some of these will last a lifetime. People have used them in full-time sewing businesses, and they swear by them. They last and last, like good Toyotas (some were even made in the Toyota factory). Parts are often interchangeable and widely available. Some of them are absolutely beautiful as well.

Once you learn to recognize them, they are easy to spot. If you tilt the machines up and look underneath, you'll find the factory designation -- JA19 for example. These "JA" machines were made in Japanese factories.

Vintage sewing machine expert Ed Lamoureux has this to say about them: Next to Necchis, I feel that post WWII Japanese machines offer the highest quality machine to the sewist. They certainly offer the best value - thrift shops and local auctions sell perfectly good japanese machines from $5 to $35. Whenever anyone asks me for an expensive machine to actually use for sewing, I point them toward a 1960s Japanese machine. I even try to keep a couple around to sell so they don't need to find, clean, and adjust one in the wild.


I like the late 1950s machines; but some of the all metal early 60s machines are quite nice too. Some time in the 60s, plastic started showing up more and more in the machines. And plastic just doesn't last like good metal, especially in the internal gears and cams. The all metal units are much more reliable and long lasting.

Oftentimes all that's needed is some cleaning (a mild degreaser can help), fresh oil and a few dabs of fresh grease, and they are good to go.
The sprung vs unsprung example made no sense to me, anything lighter would obviously have less unsprung weight, that wasn't the discussion. The discussion was what is the difference between a 150 pound rider with 50 pounds of gear attached to the suspension rear stays, vs the same 50 pounds of gear attached to the frame of the bike, the bike is still carrying 200 pounds total thus in my mind anyways, the sprung and unsprung weight is the same.

The sewing machine thing is true, to get a similar (in regards to being heavy duty) sewing machine that was sold to the general public back in the 50's and 60's one today would have to buy a commercial sewing machine like the Juki. My wife once had, she gave it away about a year ago because she doesn't need that kind of sewing ability any more, a 1953 Singer that would easily sew through heavy jeans, leather, vinyl, etc, she never found anything that it wouldn't sew through, and all she ever had to do to the machine was replace the belt, and clean and lube it. New home use machines are wimpy, but they do a variety of fancy stitching that the old ones could not do and that's what most home users wanted including my wife who bought a Janome. The problem is, which this true with almost everything built these days is that it won't last 70 years like the old which is still going strong.

Appliances are the same way, in 1973 Consumer Reports reported that the average major appliance lasted 23 years, today it's 8 years! Plus all appliances could be repaired back then today they can't. The average home electronic stereo lasted 40 years, today just 10, TV's 20 years now just 6. Cars are the odd ones because people say they last longer today but it's smoke and mirrors, because cars in the 60's wouldn't rust out as fast due to thicker sheet metal; even though engines lasted an average of 125,000 miles they were turning almost 3 times as many RPM's running down the highway at 70 mph because they only had 2 to 3 speed transmissions. (I had a 440 engine I trashed the crap out of and it ran great up until a person who bought the car smashed the car to pieces at around 175,000 miles.) But there were engines built back then that could take that high RPM and not fret because straight 6 engines back then could easily get 500,000 with most lasting 750,000 miles and more, my dad got 950,000 some odd miles on his straight 6 pickup truck that he abused frequently by overloading it. Now there were some god awful cars back then too, mostly out of England and Italy, but America had some real dogs too, even today you can find some real dogs in modern cars, electronics in cars are the biggest hassles in today's cars. Today there are a lot of recalls, back before the 80's recalls were not near as frequent, cars cost a lot more to fix today, and some transmissions like the CVT can't even be rebuilt forcing you to either scrap the car or convert it a manual which sucks big time considering they only last an average of 75,000 miles; and the more gears a transmission has the more it cost to fix it. Timing belts have to be replaced quite a bit now, failure do so results in a destroyed engine, this sort of stuff never happened in the old days, sure a timing chain could break, howbeit rarely, but the valves wouldn't slam into the piston heads either like they do today when the belt breaks. Even furniture today isn't built to last long, you can still find old antique stuff that still functions great, may have been reholstered several times and springs replaced, but most of today's stuff cannot be reholstered or resprung; beds would last 30 years, today we're told to replace them every 5 years. Most products made today barely make it past the warranty period!

In the cycling world components lasted longer back in the day because things were made simpler and the simpler designs led to longevity not to mention ease of repair both in labor and in parts replacement. Today if a component fails they're just thrown away and a new one put on because there is very little in the way of small parts to fix a component with.

Of course there are some fantastic advantages to modern stuff, but those advantages are costing us dearly not only for initial purchase but also for lack of durability. Really the only thing made today that is lasting a lot longer than a similar old fashion item did is the light bulb, incandescent bulbs would last maybe a year or two and use a lot of energy, then we moved into fluorescent lights and those would last about 3 to 5 years and used a lot less energy, now we have LED bulbs that should last at least 10 years and use very little electricity, and the cost of LED bulbs are dropping fast now.

This is all about keeping our money flowing out of our pockets and into someone else's, in this way people can stay busy working howbeit for low wages especially in China, corporations can show profits, and stock holders enjoy gains, it's called planned adolescents.
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Old 09-04-16, 12:01 PM
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata View Post
The sprung vs unsprung example made no sense to me, anything lighter would obviously have less unsprung weight, that wasn't the discussion. The discussion was what is the difference between a 150 pound rider with 50 pounds of gear attached to the suspension rear stays, vs the same 50 pounds of gear attached to the frame of the bike, the bike is still carrying 200 pounds total thus in my mind anyways, the sprung and unsprung weight is the same.
Trying to clarify: the 50 lbs attached to the rear stays has to move with the rear wheel (apart from some small amount of play or looseness) when it goes over bumps. Washboard situations make it clearer for me, because it usually involves a rapid series of bumps. Moving that additional 50 lbs up and down rapidly takes a lot of energy.

Moving the same wheel up and down rapidly when there is no additional weight attached to it is much easier.

The sprung weight (or suspended weight) in one case is 150 lbs. In the other case it is 200 lbs.

The unsprung or unsuspended weight in the first case is 50 lbs + weight of wheel and stays. In the other case it is 50 lbs lighter - just the weight of wheel and stays, which is much lighter and easier to move up and down.

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Old 09-04-16, 12:43 PM
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata View Post
The sprung vs unsprung example made no sense to me, anything lighter would obviously have less unsprung weight, that wasn't the discussion. The discussion was what is the difference between a 150 pound rider with 50 pounds of gear attached to the suspension rear stays, vs the same 50 pounds of gear attached to the frame of the bike, the bike is still carrying 200 pounds total thus in my mind anyways, the sprung and unsprung weight is the same.
Suppose you're on a bike with suspension and there's a bump ahead.

Now, let's say that your wheels, rear triangle, and the bottom part of your suspension fork all weigh next to nothing, but you have a 4000kg frame (we're assuming that the wheels and suspension are quite strong, of course). When you hit the bump, the wheels start moving up and compressing the springs. As the bump ends, the springs need to push the wheels back down into the ground so that you they can keep tracking the ground. Since the wheels and the dropouts and stuff don't weight much, the springs force them down without much fuss. And since the bump was taken up by the motion of the wheels into the suspension, your frame and anything on it (such as you) didn't feel the bump much. Suspension is working as intended.

Now, what if we change the weight distribution so that the ridiculous mass is now on the parts of the bike below the suspension? The bottom part of your fork now weighs 2000kg, and so does your rear triangle. You and your frame (the things being suspended, "sprung") now weight close to nothing compared with the wheels and the stuff rigidly attached to them (the things that are not sprung by the suspension, "unsprung").
What happens when you hit the bump?
Initially, there's not a ton of difference: the bump accelerates the unsprung weight upwards, and the springs compress.
But as the bump ends and you'd like the compressed springs to force the wheels back onto the ground, there's a problem: you've got 4000kg of stuff that is now moving upwards due to the bump. As the springs release, rather than 70kg of frame+rider pushing the 4000kg unsprung weight down, the unsprung weight pushes the frame+rider up. Now the whole bicycle system is moving upward, everything bounced up by the bump. It will eventually fall to the ground, and traveling over the bump will have been a not-so-smooth experience.

Obviously in the real world the weight differences aren't as extreme, but it hopefully illustrates the issue: the more unsprung weight you have relative to your sprung weight, the greater the extent to which a compressed suspension will push you up rather than your wheels down.
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Old 09-04-16, 01:18 PM
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Inertial mass is another way to look at it.

It takes a lot of force to accelerate a very heavy object. Gravity also plays a role. Just lifting it requires some force. The heavier the object, the more force is necessary.

In the case of the bike wheel plus load, both acceleration and gravity are involved.

The force needed to accelerate (in this case, one acceleration involved would to initiate the upward movement of the wheel to go over a bump) is proportional to the mass (force = mass x acceleration). So the greater the mass, the greater the force needed.

Speed would also be a factor. The faster the speed, the greater the acceleration needed to go up the bump, and since F=ma, the force needed is also greater.

A rapid series of bumps can slow you down very quickly - the situation is worsened when there is more mass that has to be moved up repeatedly, again and again.

The heavy mass will resist the rapid change of direction.

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Old 09-05-16, 01:08 AM
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I have pretty much finished setting up the bags on my Salsa Mukluk which is my fattie bikepacking bike.



Framebag: Bike Bag Dude custom three zipper
Saddlebag: Porcelain Rocket Mr Fusion v2
Toptube bag: Alkpit Fuel Pod Large (107 grams) with camera padding
Jones Loop H-Bar Bag: Dave Doust Memorial Jones Loop H-Bar Bag [Personal custom bag]
Handle Bar Bag System: Revelate Designs Harness
Handle Bar Bag System: Revelate Designs Pocket - Large
Handle Bar Bag System: Revelate Designs Feed Bags x 2 (82 grams each)
Handle Bar Bag System: Sea to Summit Air Stream Pumpsack
Fork Bags: Salsa Anything Bag x 2 (150 grams each)

This may need adjusting and maybe over capacity but my bikepacking rides will generally be a week between food sources and often will involve carrying water for up to three to five days so may yet have to add the Extrawheel trailer on some rides.

My first serious ride is the Holland Track here in Western Australia. I am doing water drops/banking on waterholes for this ride so not using the Extrawheel Trailer.
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Old 09-05-16, 08:43 AM
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The German Ortlieb company , maker of the very popular water proof Panniers and handle bar bags

that I have owned for a Long time, has entered the bike packing Bag Sector . They are bound to be tops.


tent & sleeping bag ..
Hand made in New Hampshire USA is Stevenson Warmlight .. you say what you want..





....

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