Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Quebec/Ontartio Questions:

Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Quebec/Ontartio Questions:

Old 09-06-16, 12:55 AM
  #1  
JohnyW
Cycled on all continents
Thread Starter
 
JohnyW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Germany
Posts: 408

Bikes: see homepage (currently only in German)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quebec/Ontartio Questions:

Hello,

We are planning a trip from Tadoussac to Toronto (north of the St. Lorenz River): And I have some questions:

1: we want to cross via Road 60 from Parc Grands Jardíns to Parc Jacques-Cartier. On the map the bridge is closed. Is it possible to use the Road?

2: Can parcs be crossed after Thanksgiving or are they not possible to enter?

3: Does any body know a park where it's possible to load our bikes in a canoe and travel 2-3 on a water way?

4: Any other tips, recommendations?

Thomas
JohnyW is offline  
Old 09-06-16, 04:55 AM
  #2  
Yan 
BeaverTerror
 
Yan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Shanghai, China
Posts: 2,005

Bikes: 1995 Kestrel 4000; 2013 True North Touring; 1989 Miele Tivoli; 1979 Colnago Sport

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 381 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
After thanksgiving is late in the season to be cycling in Quebec. A quick look on Wolfram Alpha reveals that the historical average temperature for Tadoussac on thanksgiving day is 4 to 11C. Of course that is just the average. In mid October you should expect temperatures below freezing on some nights with the possibility of snow. Even in Toronto mid to late October is when the first snow falls.

You should call Parks Canada for the status of park roads in the winter. Parks are generally open year round. Roads may not be passable depending on snow. Should be fine in October.

You need to take the standard bear precautions. If you do not ride next to the St. Lawrence expect to see a lot of forest and not much else. Don't run out of food.

It will be difficult to load two bicycles and all your luggage into a canoe. Plus, if you flip your canoe, which happens more often than you think, your bikes are gone forever. Your best bet is to leave your bikes somewhere and hire a commercial canoeing company for a short tour. Don't get wet or you will freeze.
__________________
Yan
Yan is offline  
Old 09-06-16, 07:09 AM
  #3  
gauvins
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: QC Canada
Posts: 1,130

Bikes: Custom built LHT & Troll

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 391 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by JohnyW View Post
1: we want to cross via Road 60 from Parc Grands Jardíns to Parc Jacques-Cartier. On the map the bridge is closed. Is it possible to use the Road?
AFAIK there is no road 60 in Quebec. Maybe you could share a Google Map?

Originally Posted by JohnyW View Post
2: Can parcs be crossed after Thanksgiving or are they not possible to enter?
You mean the Canadian Thanksgiving (mid October) or the American (early November).

In either case, parks remain open but facilities may be closed. The parks you refer to have few facilities anyway.

If you plan to travel in November, bring winter gear. Even mid October is late for camping.

Enquire to SEPAQ (these are provincial -- state -- parks) http://www.sepaq.com/home/index.dot?language_id=1

Originally Posted by JohnyW View Post
3: Does any body know a park where it's possible to load our bikes in a canoe and travel 2-3 on a water way?
Canoeing with a bike doesn't sound like a good idea. Try to find an outfitter that would rent canoes upstream and bring your bikes where he'll meet you downstream to recover his canoes.

---

I live in Quebec city and speak French fluently. Feel free to ask if you think I can help.

Useful resources include :

http://pistescyclables.ca

and

http://www.routeverte.com/e/
gauvins is online now  
Old 09-06-16, 08:04 AM
  #4  
jrickards
Senior Member
 
jrickards's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Sudbury, ON, CA
Posts: 2,635

Bikes: 2002 Norco Bigfoot, 2012 KHS Tempe, 1988 Bianchi Strada, 2012 Kona Sutra, 2002 Look AL 384

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 114 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I've just returned from taking my son to Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario from our home in Sudbury, Ontario. I passed a fellow twice with a bike and trailer (me going west, then returning east) and on the trailer was an upside-down canoe and under the protection of the canoe was his gear. The second time, he was pushing, with great effort, his "train" up a very long steep hill. Poor fellow, but I couldn't help.
jrickards is offline  
Old 09-06-16, 09:08 AM
  #5  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 8,616
Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1014 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Thomas, what dates are you looking at? I live in Montreal and also would not recommend touring in October due to the colder temperatures combined with the much higher chances of rain.

In addition, the direction of the prevailing winds will be headwinds in the direction you are thinking, and also the terrain from Tadoussac to Quebec involves some rather steep and long hills that make a car engine work very hard. I have driven these hills in car numerous times. On a touring bike, with a headwind, maybe at 5c with a cold rain......I just want you to realize what you are getting into.
Also, this area is colder than Montreal and more colder than Toronto, because the water of the st Lawrence river near Tadoussac etc stays around 3 or 4c all year round. Even in summer it causes what the locals call the refrigerator effect, which I have felt biking in that area.

All of these details we are mentioning are realistic, so take this into consideration that we are bike tourers telling you this.

Re canoeing, as someone who grew up doing canoe camping trips, I also highly discourage your idea to take your bikes in a canoe, the risk them becoming disposable inretrievable boat anchors is very high.....

I hope you take our advice into consideration. Weather in these areas can be very variable in Sept and October and your trip idea covers a lot of kilometres.....
djb is offline  
Old 09-06-16, 09:51 AM
  #6  
JohnyW
Cycled on all continents
Thread Starter
 
JohnyW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Germany
Posts: 408

Bikes: see homepage (currently only in German)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Hi,

we're starting on Sep. 24th in Montreal leave on October 16th from Toronto. (We take a car to Tadoussac and start cycling from there). So I mean the Canadian Thanks Giving with we probably spend in the Algoquin National Park.

Regarding route 60:
http://www.sepaq.com/dotAsset/840e96...b42cceb963.pdf
I mean the red road crossing the park from east to west.

Okay we will pack some warmer cloths. (about the wind I don't care, a few time I took care about prevailing winds... everytime I was there on non-prevailing time...)
@djb: regarding hills: perfect we thought the area will be to flat for us....

okay: the idea with the bikes on the canoe isn't such a good idea.
JohnyW is offline  
Old 09-06-16, 10:03 AM
  #7  
Erick L
Lentement mais sûrement
 
Erick L's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Montréal
Posts: 2,240
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 72 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
1- Call the park to see if you can cross the bridge on a bicycle. Maybe it's just closed but not out. All those roads between Grands-Jardins and Jacques-Cartier park are dirt. To stay on pavement, you'll have to stick to the coast.

Here's a map of Laurentides wildlife reserve between the two parks (both parks were made by cutting the reserve): https://www.sepaq.com/dotAsset/3288997.pdf

Be aware that it's hunting season in the reserve and any land that is not a park.

2- It depends. You can cross parks with a major road, obviously. Some parks close after Thanksgiving, or they have significant reduced services. Some close temporarily until winter. See sepaq.com for info. Personally, I'd cross Grands-Jardins whether it's closed or not.

3- Canoe rental is one of those thing that would be closed after Thanksgiving, at least in parks. Maybe you'd have more luck with private outfitters. I don't know any option to take a canoe at one end and leave it at another.

4- Toronto to Tadoussac should get you more favorable wind, although October can have some nasty easterly winds along with cold rain. I've done a westbound trip on dirt roads around those dates and got headwinds and rain almost every day. Starting on Thanksgiving means you'll miss most or all of fall colors. Finishing on Thanksgiving means you'd be riding during peak color. Snow Geese in Cap Tourmente peak around October 10th.
Erick L is offline  
Old 09-06-16, 10:31 AM
  #8  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 8,616
Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1014 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Re: you being concerned about it being too flat, if you can, use some mapping programs and try to get an idea of elevation change in meters for a given days ride, it might help you get a more realistic idea of how many kilometres you can do in a day, especially if you have some bike touring experience hilly areas.
On a flat day, doing 80-100kms is doable, on a day climbing 1500 metres with a headwind could mean 60kms is a long hard day....

In any case, make sure you have very good full rain gear, jacket, pants, helmet cover and shoe covers. I have ridden in September all day in cold rain at 6 or 7c and was saved by my good rain gear and wool gloves under rubber dishwashing gloves....

Good luck planning, and the weather--this is the big unknown factor....
djb is offline  
Old 09-06-16, 11:42 AM
  #9  
jefnvk
Senior Member
 
jefnvk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Metro Detroit/AA
Posts: 8,239

Bikes: 2016 Novara Mazama

Mentioned: 62 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3582 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Depending on which Thanksgiving you are referring to (I presume the Canadian one, which is seemingly Oct 10, not the American Nov 24), you may or may not find waterways frozen. Almost certainly so after the American one, and likely so from early November on. October and on is not exactly prime canoeing season.

Mid-Oct in that area (Michigan has similar weather as Toronto) can be anything from nice sunny afternoons to snow. Most nights will almost certainly be approaching freezing, and if it is not snowing, you are likely to encounter rain and wind. Be prepared.
jefnvk is offline  
Old 09-06-16, 02:08 PM
  #10  
gauvins
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: QC Canada
Posts: 1,130

Bikes: Custom built LHT & Troll

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 391 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by JohnyW View Post
Hi,

Regarding route 60:
http://www.sepaq.com/dotAsset/840e96...b42cceb963.pdf
I mean the red road crossing the park from east to west.
I've called the park and left a message on their answering machine. Will update.

If you look at the area with google satellite, it looks like there is no bridge, but water level should be low such that a bike (or 4WD) should be able to negotiate the river crossing.
gauvins is online now  
Old 09-07-16, 06:38 AM
  #11  
JohnyW
Cycled on all continents
Thread Starter
 
JohnyW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Germany
Posts: 408

Bikes: see homepage (currently only in German)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Hi Erick,

Originally Posted by Erick L View Post
Finishing on Thanksgiving means you'd be riding during peak color.
The Canadian Thanksgiving is our last week - and one major point is: we want to ride due peak color.

Regarding hills, wind and Dirt Roads: We are normally quite fit. It's touring: on a full cycling day (without hiking) we have an average of 90 km per day. (on racing bikes we can go 300km+ and 5000+ meter of altitude)
@gauvins:
Thank you very much - I'm curios about the answer

Thomas
JohnyW is offline  
Old 09-07-16, 06:49 AM
  #12  
gauvins
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: QC Canada
Posts: 1,130

Bikes: Custom built LHT & Troll

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 391 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Park ranger told me that the road you intend to take is a lumber trail (used by heavy machinery) that are closed to recreational users mid October. I was also told that these roads are unsuitable for bicycles.

I would suggest that you stop by the park office and wait until then to finalize you itinerary. Dry and sunny weather might make it a difficult yet rewarding challenge. If the road had been transformed into a mud river by rain (frequent here at that time of the year) it would be Nordic hell.
gauvins is online now  
Old 09-07-16, 10:02 AM
  #13  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 8,616
Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1014 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by JohnyW View Post
Regarding hills, wind and Dirt Roads: We are normally quite fit. It's touring: on a full cycling day (without hiking) we have an average of 90 km per day. (on racing bikes we can go 300km+ and 5000+ meter of altitude)
Thomas
that is good to know, here on an internet forum, you never know if people asking a question for a route have biked that much before, and what fitness they have and experience with riding in all kinds of weather and dealing with lots of climbing.

I think the main factor for you is still going to be the unknown factor of how the weather is, and as someone mentioned, how much rain and how it can really change riding on dirt roads, not to mention the cold and wet factor (and your choice of such things as tires, wider will be better in general if on dirt with a strong possibility of mud)

I guess all you can do is to look at different options of routes, depending on how the weather looks the closer you get to your trip.
Just remember, the difference in weather, temperature and rain etc is very very different from Toronto to Tadoussac, which you could do in a long day in a car. The great thing with the internet is being able to get very reliable, up to date weather--I highly recommend "Environment Canada" as your source, using towns near to where you want to be, I find this website to be more reliable than others, as it is the Federal country wide weather organisation.

good luck, alles gutte or whatever it is in German
djb is offline  
Old 09-07-16, 09:08 PM
  #14  
acantor
Macro Geek
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Posts: 1,332

Bikes: True North tourer (www.truenorthcycles.com), 2004; Miyata 1000, 1985

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thomas,

The roads between Tadoussac and Quebec City are as challenging as you will find anywhere in Canada: the hills are long and steep. You will encounter 13% - 15% grades regularly. The very steepest hills are 18%, and I have read on this forum about a 20% hill near les Éboulements.

You will be sharing these steep and twisting roads with large logging trucks. I recommend wearing a florescent vest to increase your visibility.

I rode from Quebec to Tadoussac, although my trip was during the summer. Scary trucks notwithstanding, it was a truly spectacular ride. But in October, be prepared for the steepest hills you might ever encounter, frigid weather, and maybe snow.
acantor is offline  
Old 09-07-16, 10:06 PM
  #15  
Thomas1976
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Brunswick, Germany
Posts: 8

Bikes: 4 bicycles (2x Randonneurs, 1x Crosser, 1x bicycle for winter, 1x bicycle for travelling)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by acantor View Post

I rode from Quebec to Tadoussac, although my trip was during the summer. Scary trucks notwithstanding, it was a truly spectacular ride. But in October, be prepared for the steepest hills you might ever encounter, frigid weather, and maybe snow.
We are riding by bicycle from Tadoussac to Quebec at the end of September not in October. Is it really true that we have to expect snow at the end of September in this area? I can not believe it when I ltake a look at the meteorological datas of the last 10 years.

We are very experienced with traffic and trucks on the road. That will be not a big problem for us. But I am totally confused about all the informations about the weather at this time in September to mid October.

Thomas
Thomas1976 is offline  
Old 09-07-16, 11:04 PM
  #16  
Yan 
BeaverTerror
 
Yan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Shanghai, China
Posts: 2,005

Bikes: 1995 Kestrel 4000; 2013 True North Touring; 1989 Miele Tivoli; 1979 Colnago Sport

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 381 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Thomas1976 View Post
We are riding by bicycle from Tadoussac to Quebec at the end of September not in October. Is it really true that we have to expect snow at the end of September in this area? I can not believe it when I ltake a look at the meteorological datas of the last 10 years.

We are very experienced with traffic and trucks on the road. That will be not a big problem for us. But I am totally confused about all the informations about the weather at this time in September to mid October.

Thomas
If you end in Toronto by mid October you should be fine. Just take winter sleeping bags.
__________________
Yan
Yan is offline  
Old 09-08-16, 12:10 AM
  #17  
gauvins
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: QC Canada
Posts: 1,130

Bikes: Custom built LHT & Troll

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 391 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Thomas1976 View Post
We are riding by bicycle from Tadoussac to Quebec at the end of September not in October. Is it really true that we have to expect snow at the end of September in this area?
Thé plateau (inland) is colder. Weather forecasts indicate a minimum as low as 6 degrees within the next two weeks. If you follow the St Laurent littoral, expect warmer nights (minimum forecast is 10).

Snow would be extremely surprising. However, we get hurricane leftovers. There is currently a heavy rain warning in effect (70mm+). You want to prepare yourself for riding in heavy downpours with a maximum of 10 degrees. (Or you'll have gorgeous weather, not a cloud in the sky, cool but not cold).


Originally Posted by Thomas1976 View Post
We are very experienced with traffic and trucks on the road.
Thomas
Québec is a great place for bike touring. There is, however, no "route verte" (bicycle path, often meaning a wide shoulder with a bike painted on it) on the north shore of the Saint Laurent. I doubt that you'll see that many logging trucks (too late in the season) but you'll share a fairly narrow road with cars and trucks that do not treat cyclist as respectfully as European drivers do. A law imposing a distance of 1 meter between a motor vehicle and a cyclist being overtaken came into effect this summer. Believe it or not, drivers are furious and you can read comments such as " if I have to chose between a cyclist and a car coming at me on the other lane, I know which one I'll hit ".

A safer itinerary would have you ride the North shore until St-Simeon, where you could take the ferry to Rivière Du Loup. There is a bike path on the south shore.

The south shore is not as spectacular as Charlevoix, but might be a better alternative (wider road, no monster hill, several nice small towns).

Would probably be possible to ride to St-Simeon and spend the night at Le Bic (a park) on the south shore for your first day. The ferry ride is great (if you are lucky you ll see belugas)

Last edited by gauvins; 09-08-16 at 12:16 AM.
gauvins is online now  
Old 09-08-16, 01:46 AM
  #18  
JohnyW
Cycled on all continents
Thread Starter
 
JohnyW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Germany
Posts: 408

Bikes: see homepage (currently only in German)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
@gauvins: Thank you very much.

Next week I post the planned Route - as we now ordered the car - and I have to adjust it.

Regarding the Traffic: I was warned in this forum about the Sea-to-Sky highway in BC because of the contruction for the Olympics in Vancouver it's impossible to ride. My feeling yes there have been a few cars...
We cycled worldwide and we have no problems in cities like Cairo, Santiago de Chile, Seoul, Taipeh or even African national roads. In 22 years of touring cycling I had 1 hour problems with traffic (in Izmir, Turkey)

Okay the rain could be a problem... In January I was in Florida (Beleave it or not: I was canoeing at 5°C)

"do not treat cyclist as respectfully as European drivers" - oh if you ignore (unsuitable) cycling paths in the business traffic in Germany: 5-10% of the car drivers have no respect (blocking, horning, shouting, breaking, overtake extra narrow) at all. My opionon world worst (but I live there, locals are always so dramatic)

BR
Thomas
JohnyW is offline  
Old 09-08-16, 08:03 AM
  #19  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 8,616
Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1014 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Thomas, as I said before, it certainly appears that you have enough experience bike traveling that the traffic will be fine for you. As always, use a rear view mirror and common sense.
About the weather, to give you an idea of how it can vary, in late September and early October one week it could be 20c or more and sunny, and another week it could be 5c and raining for days, so just remember the old saying for outdoor activity--"hope for the best but plan for the worst".

Oh, by the way, your written English is very good. Congratulations. Be prepared to use your French if you know some, as you will meet people who do not speak English, especially in small towns.

When you put up your route ideas, if I can help with Montreal area info, let me know.
Tschuss

Here is the Environment Canada website, page for Montreal, but you can choose what city or town you want.

https://weather.gc.ca/city/pages/qc-147_metric_e.html

At least starting in Tadoussac and going towards Toronto means you are going towards the warmer area. Just now I checked and Tadoussac is 19c and Toronto is 25 or 26c, pretty typical difference but often it can be more.
Cheers
djb is offline  
Old 09-08-16, 09:04 PM
  #20  
acantor
Macro Geek
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Posts: 1,332

Bikes: True North tourer (www.truenorthcycles.com), 2004; Miyata 1000, 1985

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
A safer itinerary would have you ride the North shore until St-Simeon, where you could take the ferry to Rivière Du Loup. There is a bike path on the south shore.

The south shore is not as spectacular as Charlevoix, but might be a better alternative (wider road, no monster hill, several nice small towns).

Would probably be possible to ride to St-Simeon and spend the night at Le Bic (a park) on the south shore for your first day. The ferry ride is great (if you are lucky you ll see belugas)
I have done bicycle trips on both south and north shores of the St. Lawrence. The south side is very pleasant, but Charlevoix is spectacular! I hope you have good weather in late September/early October. Try to spend time in a few villages or islands. I particularly liked Isle-aux-coudres, Petit-Rivière-Saint-Francois and Les Éboulements.

And go whale watching, if the season is still on. There is never a guarantee you will see anything, but over the years I've been on three whale watching expeditions in Charlevoix, and saw whales each time... including a 25 or 30 metre long blue whale.
acantor is offline  
Old 09-08-16, 09:08 PM
  #21  
Wileyone 
Senior Member
 
Wileyone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: GWN
Posts: 1,965
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1044 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by JohnyW View Post
Hi,

we're starting on Sep. 24th in Montreal leave on October 16th from Toronto. (We take a car to Tadoussac and start cycling from there). So I mean the Canadian Thanks Giving with we probably spend in the Algoquin National Park.

Regarding route 60:
http://www.sepaq.com/dotAsset/840e96...b42cceb963.pdf
I mean the red road crossing the park from east to west.

Okay we will pack some warmer cloths. (about the wind I don't care, a few time I took care about prevailing winds... everytime I was there on non-prevailing time...)
@djb: regarding hills: perfect we thought the area will be to flat for us....

okay: the idea with the bikes on the canoe isn't such a good idea.
Big mistake. Don't leave Montreal. Stay there you won't be sorry. Especially if there's no Wife involved.
Wileyone is offline  
Old 09-09-16, 05:15 AM
  #22  
JohnyW
Cycled on all continents
Thread Starter
 
JohnyW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Germany
Posts: 408

Bikes: see homepage (currently only in German)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by djb View Post
Be prepared to use your French if you know some
as more as I get informed I think I have to use it. The problem is I learnt it 20 years ago and everytime I was in France (every 3-4 years) I spoke my first sentence all replied in English (not good for practise). The basic I can manage and I can read a lot. I prefer Spanish as 3rd language (made good experience with Spanish in the New England states by the way)
JohnyW is offline  
Old 09-09-16, 05:36 AM
  #23  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 8,616
Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1014 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by Wileyone View Post
Big mistake. Don't leave Montreal. Stay there you won't be sorry. Especially if there's no Wife involved.
Odd comment.
djb is offline  
Old 09-09-16, 12:58 PM
  #24  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 8,616
Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1014 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by JohnyW View Post
as more as I get informed I think I have to use it. The problem is I learnt it 20 years ago and everytime I was in France (every 3-4 years) I spoke my first sentence all replied in English (not good for practise). The basic I can manage and I can read a lot. I prefer Spanish as 3rd language (made good experience with Spanish in the New England states by the way)
where tourists go you will find people who speak English, but in smaller towns and stores etc, you probably will only find French. Thats ok, just practice your phrases like "I am from Germany and only speak a little French", and "please repeat that slowly" etc etc

make an effort and it will be fine, and you have travelled a lot so you know the routine, use gestures and all that, it will work out.
djb is offline  
Old 09-13-16, 02:12 PM
  #25  
Thomas1976
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Brunswick, Germany
Posts: 8

Bikes: 4 bicycles (2x Randonneurs, 1x Crosser, 1x bicycle for winter, 1x bicycle for travelling)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
By the way,

we prefer to cook with gas, not with petrol. It is easier und cleaner to cook with gas.

Where can we get gas cartridges with thread in Ontario and Quebec (e.g. Primus, Coleman Snow Peak and many others, but no pierceable gas cylinder)? In which stores can we buy gas cartridges for our stove? Is it possible to get gas cartridges at gas stations?

Many thanks for help!

BC
Thomas
Thomas1976 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.