Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Freestanding tents!

Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Freestanding tents!

Reply

Old 09-23-16, 04:36 PM
  #1  
Lt Stonez
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Skien Norway
Posts: 425

Bikes: Specialized Sirrus Comp Carbon Disc '14

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 78 Post(s)
Freestanding tents!

Anybody use this one Helsport Trolltind Superlight 2
light but not UL, but what else can you BFtouring people recommand on freestanding tents?

Cheers
Lt Stonez is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-16, 05:01 PM
  #2  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 21,036

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 84 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2264 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Lt Stonez View Post
Anybody use this one Helsport Trolltind Superlight 2
light but not UL, but what else can you BFtouring people recommand on freestanding tents?

Cheers
That seems like a significant chunk of change for a tent that isn't all that light. The Big Agnes Fly Creek Platinum 2 is crazy expensive but comes in 900g straight out of the box for about $100 (90) less. The Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2 weigh in right at 1 kg for $235 (209) less. That extra 100 grams less probably isn't worth the $200 price tag difference on between the Platinum and the UL2.

I have two Big Agnes tents...a Seedhouse SL2 and a Fly Creek UL1...and like both of them.
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-16, 06:52 PM
  #3  
BigAura
 
BigAura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Chapin, SC
Posts: 3,365

Bikes: all steel stable: surly world troller, paris sport fixed, fuji ss

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 570 Post(s)
I've used my Big Agnes Fly Creek 2 as a free-stander & it works ok. BUT it's at it's best when fully guy-lined, for breathability, wind, and rain. It's 1.19kg(42oz) by my packed measure. Fully free-standing is over-rated, in that the situations where it's useful or required is limited, in my experience.



I just used it here for bug protection. You can see the slight droopyness in rear section.

Last edited by BigAura; 09-23-16 at 07:12 PM.
BigAura is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-16, 07:10 PM
  #4  
Dream Cyclery
Wheel Builder
 
Dream Cyclery's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Posts: 148
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
I wouldn't consider Fly Creek as a freestanding tent. If you like Big agnes, Copper Spur is better. Freestanding tent is useful if you need to setup inside a hut or abandoned building.
Dream Cyclery is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-16, 08:37 PM
  #5  
robow
Senior Member
 
robow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 3,160
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 221 Post(s)
Originally Posted by BigAura View Post
Fully free-standing is over-rated, in that the situations where it's useful or required is limited, in my experience.
.
I would disagree and have used my free standing tents such as my Big Agnes Seedhouse 2 many times where staking out was to be inconvenient or nearly impossible. All my tents are freestanding for that reason. But I do understand others such as yourself who find it of minimal importance. Many hot summer nights I have set up under a pavilion and left the rain fly off for better ventilation without worries of getting wet.
robow is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-16, 08:55 PM
  #6  
prathmann
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Bay Area, Calif.
Posts: 7,262
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 657 Post(s)
Originally Posted by robow View Post
I would disagree and have used my free standing tents such as my Big Agnes Seedhouse 2 many times where staking out was to be inconvenient or nearly impossible. All my tents are freestanding for that reason. But I do understand others such as yourself who find it of minimal importance. Many hot summer nights I have set up under a pavilion and left the rain fly off for better ventilation without worries of getting wet.
But I've had no problem setting up my non-freestanding tents in such situations. I've never found stakes to be important if I can run a couple light lines (which I have anyway as clothes lines) to anything in the vicinity. Works fine in pavilions, on wooden platforms in a swamp, on rock slabs, or inside my house when checking out a tent before a trip.
prathmann is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-16, 09:36 PM
  #7  
azza_333
Senior Member
 
azza_333's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 723

Bikes: Custom Carbon Fibre Ultegra Di2 touring bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 87 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Lt Stonez View Post
Anybody use this one Helsport Trolltind Superlight 2
light but not UL, but what else can you BFtouring people recommand on freestanding tents?

Cheers
I rate the BigSky Internation Soul 1P and 2P pretty highly, they pack tiny, super light, good value for money, completely free standing, and a dull green/grey color for stealth camping.

Soul 1P tent - ultralight bargain - Big Sky International - Lightweight Outdoor gear for Backpacking, Camping, Hiking, Trekking, and Travel

Big Sky Soul x2 tent - Big Sky International - Lightweight Outdoor gear for Backpacking, Camping, Hiking, Trekking, and Travel
azza_333 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-16, 06:14 AM
  #8  
thumpism 
Bikes are okay, I guess.
 
thumpism's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Posts: 4,385

Bikes: Waterford Paramount Touring, Bridgestone RB-T, Trek 510 city build, Giant CFM-2, Raleigh Sports 3-speeds in M23 L23 and L19, Schwinn Cimarron oddball build, Raleigh DL-1

Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1136 Post(s)
I recently toured with my bro-in-law and we used identical ALPS Meramac2 freestanding tents. He staked his out every night and I never did but would have considered it in windy conditions. Good tent but not super light. They also make a 1-man version, both available from Campmor for well under a C-note.
thumpism is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-16, 06:58 AM
  #9  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 21,079
Mentioned: 150 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7738 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Dream Cyclery View Post
I wouldn't consider Fly Creek as a freestanding tent.
I have one and understand what you mean. You really need to stake out those back corners if you want full floor space.
indyfabz is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-16, 07:34 AM
  #10  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 21,036

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 84 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2264 Post(s)
Originally Posted by BigAura View Post
I've used my Big Agnes Fly Creek 2 as a free-stander & it works ok. BUT it's at it's best when fully guy-lined, for breathability, wind, and rain. It's 1.19kg(42oz) by my packed measure. Fully free-standing is over-rated, in that the situations where it's useful or required is limited, in my experience.



I just used it here for bug protection. You can see the slight droopyness in rear section.
Originally Posted by Dream Cyclery View Post
I wouldn't consider Fly Creek as a freestanding tent. If you like Big agnes, Copper Spur is better. Freestanding tent is useful if you need to setup inside a hut or abandoned building.
Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
I have one and understand what you mean. You really need to stake out those back corners if you want full floor space.
You guys are putting too fine a point on "freestanding". A freestanding tent is one that will stand on its own. It has a frame that supports the tent. A non-freestanding tent is one that doesn't have a frame and must be staked down to stand up. Think tarp tents, traditional "pup" tents, military shelter half, etc.

It is wise to tie the tent down with either lines or tent pegs but that is a separate issue and doesn't change the fact that the tent has a frame that holds it up.
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-16, 10:29 AM
  #11  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 39,649

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 167 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6195 Post(s)
I like the ones that dont blow away while you are putting them Up..

my Hoop tent gets 1 end staked down , the 2 arched end poles go in sleeves while still flat on the ground.

then I pull it up and set the near end stakes , and once UP, added more stakes ..

some nights I felt I was inside a Flag , but it held up for the whole trip.



for OP In Norway, look into Sweden's Hilleberg tents http://us.hilleberg.com/EN/.. tentmaker@hilleberg.se

On hard surfaces I use a bag of dirt/rocks, tied where the stakes go..

On the weather decks of ferries , like used to ply the Seattle - Alaska Route , people Duct taped their tents down.




./.

Last edited by fietsbob; 09-26-16 at 10:52 AM.
fietsbob is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-16, 02:40 PM
  #12  
robow
Senior Member
 
robow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 3,160
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 221 Post(s)
Originally Posted by prathmann View Post
But I've had no problem setting up my non-freestanding tents in such situations. I've never found stakes to be important if I can run a couple light lines
Of course you're correct, it can be done with lines, but I'm too lazy. Besides, I sometimes like to chase the shade and so I set my tent up in mid afternoon but that damn sun, you know it just has to move on me and a while later my tent, she's a cookin'. I rarely stake it down unless it's windy or we're in for some foul weather so I just pick that tent up drop it in the shade. It's also nice and handy in the morning to just pick up the free standing tent, hold it above your head with the door open and shake out all the cookie crumbs and nacho chips on your face before you pack it away for the day's ride. There are those that love the Tarp tents and enjoy saving a pound or so, God luv em', it's all good.
robow is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-16, 12:11 AM
  #13  
MassiveD
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 2,430
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 30 Post(s)
Free standing tents are an advantage, but at a cost in weight and dollars. Their biggest advantage is the difference in quality of internal space. That really helps for two, less a factor for one, where most tents are pretty good.

You can always put up a tent or fly but it may not be for everyone, and Robow makes some good points. Recently in early fall got some crazy dew. It was great to pick the whole thing up and orient it for the sun. The morning sun soon had it dried out. Our site was in the shade, so we just moved it to a sunnier one.
MassiveD is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-16, 04:33 AM
  #14  
2 Piece
Senior Member
 
2 Piece's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Virginia
Posts: 341

Bikes: Motobecane Century Pro Ti Disc

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 69 Post(s)
I really like my Mountain Hard wear Super Mega UL2 tent. Swapped out to included stuff sack for UL mesh sack and the included aluminum stakes for titanium and I am right at 2 pounds (32 ounces) or .9kg. The tent its self is free standing but the fly needs to be guyed out.
2 Piece is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-16, 07:13 AM
  #15  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 21,036

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 84 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2264 Post(s)
Originally Posted by 2 Piece View Post
... the included aluminum stakes for titanium...
You are going the wrong way if you want to save weight. Titanium is stronger than aluminum but 60% heavier. A milliliter of aluminum weighs 2.7g while a milliliter of titanium weighs 4.5g.

A better choice for the replacement of the aluminum stakes would MSR carbon core tent stakes.
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-16, 10:09 AM
  #16  
Yan 
BeaverTerror
 
Yan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Shanghai, China
Posts: 2,005

Bikes: 1995 Kestrel 4000; 2013 True North Touring; 1989 Miele Tivoli; 1979 Colnago Sport

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 381 Post(s)
I use the MSR Hubba Bubba NX2, a very popular full sized two person tent with double doors and double vestibules, weighing 1.6kg packed, and cheaper than the one in your link too.

I see you are from Scandinavia. For that budget you should consider a Swedish Hilleberg. Those are very nice tents.
__________________
Yan
Yan is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-16, 10:46 AM
  #17  
robow
Senior Member
 
robow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 3,160
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 221 Post(s)
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Titanium is stronger than aluminum but 60% heavier.
But can't you use less material if stronger to produce the same amount of strength for the given item? Though true, 60% would seem a great deal to have to compensate for to produce any meaningful weight difference. Btw, I'm not a gram counter when picking my touring gear, pounds-yes, grams-no (OK, unless we're talking 453g and then I'm interested)
robow is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-16, 10:55 AM
  #18  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 39,649

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 167 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6195 Post(s)
^^ Yea, same for steel 1017 vs 4130 strength goal is the same , just with chromoly less is needed to get there.
fietsbob is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-16, 12:14 PM
  #19  
mdilthey
Senior Member
 
mdilthey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,923

Bikes: Nature Boy 853 Disc, Pugsley SS

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 249 Post(s)
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
You are going the wrong way if you want to save weight. Titanium is stronger than aluminum but 60% heavier. A milliliter of aluminum weighs 2.7g while a milliliter of titanium weighs 4.5g.

A better choice for the replacement of the aluminum stakes would MSR carbon core tent stakes.

Titanium stakes of any design are always lighter than an equivalent aluminum stake, because the aluminum stake has to be about 1mm thick to prevent bending or snapping and the titanium stake can be made as thin as construction paper.

Similarly, though titanium is heavier than steel, a titanium pot can be much, much thinner without risking too much bending and denting. Thus, the titanium pot is a lighter pot.


First-hand knowledge easily corrects this misunderstanding, since holding both types of stakes in your hand at once clearly shows the weight advantage of titanium.



Now, all that said, I use aluminum stakes because they are cheap to replace when lost.
mdilthey is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-16, 05:41 PM
  #20  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 21,036

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 84 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2264 Post(s)
Originally Posted by robow View Post
But can't you use less material if stronger to produce the same amount of strength for the given item? Though true, 60% would seem a great deal to have to compensate for to produce any meaningful weight difference. Btw, I'm not a gram counter when picking my touring gear, pounds-yes, grams-no (OK, unless we're talking 453g and then I'm interested)
Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
Titanium stakes of any design are always lighter than an equivalent aluminum stake, because the aluminum stake has to be about 1mm thick to prevent bending or snapping and the titanium stake can be made as thin as construction paper.

Similarly, though titanium is heavier than steel, a titanium pot can be much, much thinner without risking too much bending and denting. Thus, the titanium pot is a lighter pot.


First-hand knowledge easily corrects this misunderstanding, since holding both types of stakes in your hand at once clearly shows the weight advantage of titanium.



Now, all that said, I use aluminum stakes because they are cheap to replace when lost.

The mistake that people make about titanium is that is it isn't a stiff metal. Although it is strong and relatively light, it isn't stiff. I've seen the thin titanium stakes that are available and would opt for the aluminum or the carbon fiber ones...which I have...because titanium will bend rather easily. Hit a rock while inserting the thin titanium stakes and you'll have a corkscrew instead of a tent stake.

Another advantage of the aluminum clad carbon stakes is that they are harder to lose. They are very light...same weight as some titanium stakes...and large enough to see if you happen to drop one in the grass.

As for using titanium for cooking, yes, it can be made thinner for weight but that thinness works against it for anything other than boiling water. As a thin material that doesn't conduct heat, it doesn't cook evenly. And it is still soft so it dents more easily.

Even if you were to make the titanium thicker, it still wouldn't cook well because titanium doesn't conduct heat that well. And you'd lose the weight advantage.
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-16, 05:55 PM
  #21  
mdilthey
Senior Member
 
mdilthey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,923

Bikes: Nature Boy 853 Disc, Pugsley SS

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 249 Post(s)
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
The mistake that people make about titanium is that is it isn't a stiff metal. Although it is strong and relatively light, it isn't stiff. I've seen the thin titanium stakes that are available and would opt for the aluminum or the carbon fiber ones...which I have...because titanium will bend rather easily. Hit a rock while inserting the thin titanium stakes and you'll have a corkscrew instead of a tent stake.

Another advantage of the aluminum clad carbon stakes is that they are harder to lose. They are very light...same weight as some titanium stakes...and large enough to see if you happen to drop one in the grass.

As for using titanium for cooking, yes, it can be made thinner for weight but that thinness works against it for anything other than boiling water. As a thin material that doesn't conduct heat, it doesn't cook evenly. And it is still soft so it dents more easily.

Even if you were to make the titanium thicker, it still wouldn't cook well because titanium doesn't conduct heat that well. And you'd lose the weight advantage.

Really? I have titanium stakes with hundreds of uses that have not bent, and I have four titanium pots, the oldest of which I've been using for four years, and none are bent. Most of my friends use titanium pots, mugs, and sporks, and none of theirs are bent.

In hundreds of uses and the added data of everyone I know, titanium hasn't been anything but extremely reliable and durable. I have several aluminum pots that are riddled with dents and damage, and we had one aluminum pot rupture after being dropped on a winter trip. Never an issue with Ti.

How have you personally used titanium stakes? It's possible my use is more light-duty, but since many thousands of people use titanium stakes and pots regularly, I think the metal is more than up to the tasks it is designed for, with a hefty weight savings as a bonus.
mdilthey is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-16, 06:00 PM
  #22  
HTupolev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Seattle
Posts: 2,603
Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1129 Post(s)
Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
Similarly, though titanium is heavier than steel, a titanium pot can be much, much thinner without risking too much bending and denting. Thus, the titanium pot is a lighter pot.
Titanium is much lower-density than steel, and much less stiff. By volume, it's no stronger than many common steels, and it sucks compared with high-end steels. Titanium items manage to be made lighter than steel items not because they're thinner, but because even if they're thicker they can end up lighter. A titanium item that's "much, much" thinner than a steel item will be ridiculously flimsy and weak by comparison; even a titanium item that's the same thickness as a steel item can be somewhat flimsy by comparison, if the steel is a good steel.
HTupolev is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-16, 06:02 PM
  #23  
mdilthey
Senior Member
 
mdilthey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,923

Bikes: Nature Boy 853 Disc, Pugsley SS

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 249 Post(s)
Originally Posted by HTupolev View Post
Titanium is much lower-density than steel, and much less stiff. By volume, it's no stronger than many common steels, and it sucks compared with high-end steels. Titanium items manage to be made lighter than steel items not because they're thinner, but because even if they're thicker they can end up lighter. A titanium item that's "much, much" thinner than a steel item will be very flimsy and weak by comparison; even a titanium item that's the same thickness as a steel item can be somewhat flimsy by comparison, if the steel is a good steel.
Okay. Whatever my failings are with metallurgy, in practice, titanium is great for these uses and the items I have that are made from titanium have no durability issues.

The durability issues listed here seem to be theories, not experiences.
mdilthey is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-16, 06:07 PM
  #24  
prathmann
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Bay Area, Calif.
Posts: 7,262
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 657 Post(s)
Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
Really? I have titanium stakes with hundreds of uses that have not bent, and I have four titanium pots, the oldest of which I've been using for four years, and none are bent. Most of my friends use titanium pots, mugs, and sporks, and none of theirs are bent.
Agreed. I have used plenty of fairly thick (and heavy) aluminum stakes and frequently had to bend them back into reasonable shape at the end of a trip. OTOH, the thin and very light Ti stakes I've been using for the last few years stay nice and straight. The only issue I've had with them is that they are so thin that they lack holding power in loose soil or sandy ground so sometimes I have to reinforce them with rocks on top
prathmann is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-16, 10:26 AM
  #25  
niknak
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 715
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
Okay. Whatever my failings are with metallurgy, in practice, titanium is great for these uses and the items I have that are made from titanium have no durability issues.

The durability issues listed here seem to be theories, not experiences.
Half of my ti stakes are bent at this point. The Shepard hook versions are terrible for concrete type soil because you can't pound them in with a stone.

I prefer the MSR groundhogs. Cheap, light, and strong.

Like cycocommute said, ti pots don't conduct heat well and their thinness means that they burn solid foods quickly. Never dented mine though in about 10 years of use.
niknak is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service