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Exotic touring wheel material... can't remember the name

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Exotic touring wheel material... can't remember the name

Old 10-06-16, 08:08 AM
  #1  
Pukeskywalker
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Exotic touring wheel material... can't remember the name

I remember reading a touring blog about a guy with special touring rims

They were made out of a special material that was heavier than usual, and the benefit was that the brake tracks would last much longer, and the rims were "stronger"

I remember they were more expensive and heavier than standard aluminum -- it an older, obscure tech, and it was not steel.

If anyone has any idea I'd like to hear it. I am wracking my brain for the name

I believe it was a single brand that made the rims, not well known, but was around at least 10 years ago
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Old 10-06-16, 08:12 AM
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And I found them. I'll keep the thread open anyways.

Ceramic touring rims with "tungsten carbide finish"

Spa Cycles Ceramic Touring wheels review - BikeRadar
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Old 10-06-16, 12:21 PM
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Aluminum rims with a custom ceramic coating flame-sprayed (or something) onto the braking surface--there were also rims from more than one manufacturer with the coatings, including Mavic, for various applications. Some had problems with the coating being subject to chipping.
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Old 10-06-16, 01:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Pukeskywalker View Post
I remember reading a touring blog about a guy with special touring rims

They were made out of a special material that was heavier than usual, and the benefit was that the brake tracks would last much longer, and the rims were "stronger"

I remember they were more expensive and heavier than standard aluminum -- it an older, obscure tech, and it was not steel.

If anyone has any idea I'd like to hear it. I am wracking my brain for the name

I believe it was a single brand that made the rims, not well known, but was around at least 10 years ago
They're aluminum, nothing obscure or special. If you make a rim with lots of aluminum it'll be heavy.
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Old 10-06-16, 02:35 PM
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Anodizing or ceramic coating of brake surfaces will make them last longer... at least for a time.

The downside at least with anodized surfaces is that as they wear, the brake tracks become splotchy

Here is an example from a web download.


The uneven wear is exacerbated by distortion from spoke tension.

The ceramic coating will last longer than anodized, but eventually it will wear through.
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Old 10-06-16, 03:02 PM
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Any reason to not go with carbon rims for touring?
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Old 10-06-16, 03:20 PM
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Broken wheels end your tour.
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Old 10-06-16, 03:30 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
Anodizing or ceramic coating of brake surfaces will make them last longer... at least for a time.

The downside at least with anodized surfaces is that as they wear, the brake tracks become splotchy

....

The uneven wear is exacerbated by distortion from spoke tension.

The ceramic coating will last longer than anodized, but eventually it will wear through.
That is a result of the inner of the double Ferrules compressing ing the 2 walls of the rim & causing it to bulge ,
they carried over this double ferrule, from making rolled tube Sew-up Rims

Double wall single ferrule Rims don't do that (inner wall drilled )

Mavic EX 721. I put on an abrasive Pad compound (Magura Green) scoured thru the CD anodizing
on a couple wet down hill stops
and then put a salmon compound pads in and its been fine ever since ... 4 years running..




'/,

Last edited by fietsbob; 10-07-16 at 08:25 AM.
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Old 10-06-16, 08:26 PM
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I considered going with aerospoke wheels, they were reasonably popular with bent riders, and they are strong. They are also heavy, but there is a trade-off given there is some aero advantage. I don't think they are the best idea, but I wouldn't worry about them if I had them.
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Old 10-06-16, 08:30 PM
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Anodized vs. Non-anodized Rims by Jobst Brandt

Synopsis is they are worse for heat, wear, and cracks. According to the Oracle.
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Old 10-07-16, 07:04 AM
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the few times I have read of these rims in touring blogs, they very much seem to be able to last a long long long time. As noted, need the specific pads made for this.
Would seem to make sense to use them on a really long trip if going with rim brakes where you are going to be in all sorts of gritty yucky riding conditions.
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Old 10-07-16, 09:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Squeezebox View Post
Any reason to not go with carbon rims for touring?
Why not? I don't have problems with carbon wheels.
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Old 10-07-16, 10:01 AM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Broken wheels end your tour.
Same with aluminium.
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Old 10-07-16, 10:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Dream Cyclery View Post
Same with aluminium.
Or collar bone
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Old 10-07-16, 10:50 AM
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I wonder what the high end mountain bikers are using. Carbon rims are used on tandems.
Still not in my price range though.
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Old 10-07-16, 10:59 AM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
the few times I have read of these rims in touring blogs, they very much seem to be able to last a long long long time. As noted, need the specific pads made for this.
Would seem to make sense to use them on a really long trip if going with rim brakes where you are going to be in all sorts of gritty yucky riding conditions.

I should make clear the link I provided is related to standard anodizing, and not some super process, though some of the issues might be the same, like the micro fissureing of the surface during rolling, but no reason to assume that.
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Old 10-07-16, 12:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Squeezebox View Post
Any reason to not go with carbon rims for touring?

The only big reason is expense IMHO.

*edit*

They *do* seem to ride more harshly than aluminum w/tubeless though. At least on the CX bikes I've tried. Never tried carbon with rim brakes either, but I've heard that they kinda suck when it gets rainy and muddy.

Last edited by manapua_man; 10-07-16 at 12:26 PM.
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Old 10-07-16, 12:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Squeezebox View Post
Any reason to not go with carbon rims for touring?
I was thinking about that on my last trip. I had about 4 miles of 1-lane twisting, 8 to 10% descents including a few switchbacks. Fully loaded. I just didn't feel comfortable letting it rip down the hill...

I haven't paid a lot of attention to my rims in the past, but they got pretty toasty going down that mountain.

Anyway, I'm not beyond considering touring on Carbon Fiber rims with disc brakes, but I think I'll pass on touring with CF rim brakes.

That trip also took me to some pretty barren summits and ridges over 7000 feet, and in places the wind was just wicked (with vertical dropoffs on the side of the narrow 2-lane road). The panniers were enough like a sail. Anyway, I think low profile rims would be the way to go.

Actually, I haven't built up my CF wheels yet. But, I am also thinking about limiting the time riding in the rain, dirt, and sand. So, I still might choose to avoid taking them on some tours.
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Old 10-07-16, 12:23 PM
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Well considering the special surface coatings improve the wear resistance of the brake track I'd wager the problem with carbon would be not lasting a full tour before the rim wearing through. It'd get expensive.
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Old 10-07-16, 12:34 PM
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Originally Posted by elcruxio View Post
Well considering the special surface coatings improve the wear resistance of the brake track I'd wager the problem with carbon would be not lasting a full tour before the rim wearing through. It'd get expensive.
It depends on whether you're considering a tour to be a long weekend, or 6 months on the road.

Even so, you don't necessarily want disposable gear.

Like I said, disc brakes would make a lot more sense if touring on CF. Yeah, maybe a slight weight penalty, but the wheels should be quite sturdy.
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Old 10-07-16, 12:48 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
It depends on whether you're considering a tour to be a long weekend, or 6 months on the road.

Even so, you don't necessarily want disposable gear.

Like I said, disc brakes would make a lot more sense if touring on CF. Yeah, maybe a slight weight penalty, but the wheels should be quite sturdy.
I'm a pretty big fan of disc brakes in general. A decent set of hydros (I love those cable actuated ones) just feels so much better, especially if you've got screwed up hands/arms like myself.
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Old 10-07-16, 12:54 PM
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Originally Posted by LeeG View Post
Or collar bone
Welcome to 21st century.
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Old 10-07-16, 12:54 PM
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It seems like the weight gain of the disc brakes might offset the weight gain of the carbon rims. IMO that is not a good trade. What would be the advantage? I am biased though, not being a big fan of disc brakes for touring.

Rideable


To be fair this, this is a lightweight tubular rim, but it does not take a whole lot of trauma to make them useless. The hub is still good
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Old 10-07-16, 01:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Doug64 View Post
It seems like the weight gain of the disc brakes might offset the weight gain of the carbon rims. IMO that is not a good trade. What would be the advantage? I am biased though, not being a big fan of disc brakes for touring.

Rideable

To be fair this, this is a lightweight tubular rim, but it does not take a whole lot of trauma to make them useless. The hub is still good

I see quite a few CX guys in my area running carbon rims and disc brakes, so there's probably some advantage to it...that won't matter at all for touring.
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Old 10-07-16, 01:55 PM
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Big Difference; CX races are around a Loop course, Several times, and Only an Hour long.
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