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Especially Satisfying Bar-Hand Contact-Area Setups?

Old 11-08-16, 10:04 AM
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lightspree
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Especially Satisfying Bar-Hand Contact-Area Setups?

Gel pads covered with cork tape...gel-padded gloves...certain types of foams...Ergon grips...some types of bar ends...certain aero bars...wide hoods...others?


(Not a question about handlebar shapes so much, though input on that would be welcomed as well. Mostly interested in especially good-feeling hand-to-bar experiences.

Thin bars with thin tape just don't cut it for me. Thicker diameter bars and padding are way more comfortable. Absorbent materials feel good for longer hauls. Sweaty non-breathing materials are not so good....

I test rode and almost bought a used touring bike recently that had a great fit and riding position -- not as hunched over as usual. And the hoods were especially wide and comfortable on the hands. They made for an excellent riding experience, and were comfortable for long rides.

There is another bike I really like, and ride a lot; but the bare metal bar ends are not so great, even with padded gloves. The small diameter increases contact-area pressure levels. Wide diameters are more comfortable to hold on to, and distribute the stress over a larger area, with no concentrated stress points on the hands. And they just feel better.

So I would love to find some good, or very good (preferably very good), ways of transforming those bar ends.

Other bikes I ride have similar issues with sub-optimal diameters, materials, shock absorption, and general feel. Wanting to change that.
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Old 11-08-16, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by lightspree View Post
...There is another bike I really like, and ride a lot; but the bare metal bar ends are not so great, even with padded gloves. ....So I would love to find some good, or very good (preferably very good), ways of transforming those bar ends.
you put foamy rubber grips on your bars....why not on your bar ends as well?
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Old 11-08-16, 10:29 AM
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Originally Posted by saddlesores View Post
you put foamy rubber grips on your bars....why not on your bar ends as well?
Agreed. Any specific suggestions would be welcomed (some foams may be much better than others, and there may be other materials too...).

Especially for a main hand position on long rides.
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Old 11-08-16, 10:46 AM
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I buy window weather strip foam from the local hardware store (sticky on one side) and use a ridiculous amount of it to achieve a large diameter grip. The outside is then wrapped in electrical tape. (Gorilla tape is even better but slick). Super cushy. Looks bad. Cheap. Redo this before or during a tour.
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Old 11-08-16, 10:54 AM
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I once order, and manually sewed on, a set of leather drop bar covers for my road bike.... that was by far the nicest. IIRC, you needed to sew it on wet (pre-punch holes), and it shrunk/dried for a skin tight fit and looked and felt just like a high-end car's leather steering wheel. Unfortunately, the bike was promptly stolen... and I wouldn't doubt that leather bar covers were a contributing factor - it was really unique/nice.
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Old 11-08-16, 11:06 AM
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I am probably more of an expert in what not to do. As much as I like the feel of leather, I have found out he hard way it gets soaked and slimy in sweaty heat, and worse if it rains -- then it dries hard. On flat bar bikes the Ergon shape works well for me. For drop bar, I have used track grips on the bottom part of the bar, or extra wrap, and found that makes riding in the drops more pleasant. Benotto tape has a great look & feel, but zero padding; nice as a final wrap on top of something else.
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Old 11-08-16, 11:12 AM
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no longer sold .. 'Off the Front' grip shapes.(several sets) under the tape, created a broad flat area on my Randonneur bend Drop bar tops,
less used on the drops but there were enough to have that too ..

Bike tour: 6 months Plus.. [DIY with a gouged out mold, and some of that liquid rubber, poured in]

Current bike: Trekking Bars, I use 2 layers of tape, the thick foam type. Recycled 1st layer, New top layer.

Brompton: Ergon GR3.




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Old 11-08-16, 11:16 AM
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"... Not a question about handlebar shapes so much, though input on that would be welcomed as well. Mostly interested in especially good-feeling hand-to-bar experiences. ..."

My first thought was that bar shape and placement and the same for brake levers and bar ends is of tantamount importance for hand comfort and should be completely dialed in before even thinking about padding, either on the bike or your hands. I have been known to go for rides with bare handlebars (or just enough electrical tape to keep cables where they belong) and the wrenches so can play with lever placement while on a ride.

I do always wear gloves, now cheap Performance gloves so that I am wearing them should I crash but on cooler days, I like the Dankin MTB gloves that are very thin and have no padding.

I should say that all my bikes are road bikes with quality steel forks, aluminum handlebars, aluminum rims and 32 X3 or (preferred) 36 X4 double-butted spoked wheels and I ride with less than max air pressure in my tires. I have haven't ridden bikes other than that in the past 40 years so my results may not apply to your experience.

And my opinion (which is sure to be unpopular with some) is that brifters are a step backwards, that making such an important part of the bike fit/comfort equation both expensive and time consuming to replace is putting the most important aspect of the bike, fit, on the back burner. (They have also driven a trend of relegating what can and I believe should be an ultimately hand friendly place to an afterthought; the drops. I set my bikes up to be all-day comfortable there with great brake lever access. Only then do I address the hoods.)

Ben
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Old 11-08-16, 11:25 AM
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Some of my bars have leather ends called Whiskey grips on amazon. I'm very fond of those.

Last edited by PedalingWalrus; 11-08-16 at 12:08 PM.
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Old 11-08-16, 12:59 PM
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Bar tape is relatively cheap. Try a bunch until you find something you like. Cheap cork tape is just fine for my hands, and plenty affordable at <$10 a set.

For me personally, the gloves matter more than the tape. I did over 100 miles on shakedown setting up my touring bike with nothing but gloves and friction hockey tape keeping the brake cables in place, no issues. 15 miles without my gloves on a nice padded bar isn't my favorite thing in the world when I forget my gloves on my after work bar ride. I don't have anything fancy, just whatever is on sale for $15 in the spring when I inevitably cannot find my ratty and worn pair from the previous year.

Just a question, though, if you mention a different bike with a different position makes your hands feel better, are you sure you just don't prefer a certain position, and the sore hands nothing but a symptom of bad posture?
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Old 11-08-16, 01:42 PM
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31.8 mm drops with "flat tops" are excellent. I also added specialized "bar phat" (gel pads) on the tops with Cinelli gel cork tape. Finally interrupter brake levers on the bar tops, make for a more natural relaxed grip.

Last edited by mm718; 11-12-16 at 03:58 PM.
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Old 11-08-16, 02:47 PM
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I use flat bars on my touring bike, not drops. I use one that is wide( big shoulders) with some sweep back, 10-15 degrees. Bar ends too, ones that fit my hands. Then a double wrap of bar tape on all, for my big hands. Lots of positions to change up and be comfortable.
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Old 11-08-16, 03:03 PM
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Hoods are nice on drop bars, as are Cane Creek bar ends on riser bars. About the same hand positions for both setups, and comfortable for all day riding.
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Old 11-09-16, 09:05 PM
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Not touring yet but thought I'd chime in.

I have been using Specialized Bar Phat gel inserts for my bars since building up the bike. The tape got pretty worn down by sweat though, plus I didn't wrap it very well (first time doing that).

I recently replaced and rewrapped with Cambium natural tape (more for matching my saddle at first), still using the gel inserts, and slipped cut pieces of old inner tube onto the bars. Also due to the season I've been using old suede driving gloves. All that has exponentially increased my comfort level when I'm not hanging on to the hoods.
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Old 11-10-16, 08:55 AM
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I have had really good experiences with ESI silicone grips. They make bar tape as well.

The ESI grips/tape are made with a silicone rubber, so they're pretty durable and UV resistant. They don't wear out for a long time, 1+ years in my experience. When they do wear out, new grips are $12. I have also found them to be pretty well insulating, which is good in the winter.

They're also made in the USA, always a plus!

One downside: they are not great for bare hands. I use a pair of gloves with no padding in them. Sweat-on-skin is slippery, same with rain. They are also ABSOLUTELY MISERABLE to get on the bar - I've almost pulled my shoulder sliding them on. Compressed air and windex helps. Once they're on, they don't move without just as much of a fight, so choose your shifter/brake carefully.

Picture below after a 30-day tour in Iceland, and an extra two months of commuting. As you can see by the bar-end, I dropped the bike a couple of times...



Someone always gets grumpy with me when I talk about products, so just FYI, I'm not affiliated with ESI in any way, or ever have been.
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Old 11-12-16, 12:16 AM
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Fizik Bar Gels work pretty nice: 4 strips that give extra cushion underneath tape on tops & drops. Also re-usable.
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Old 12-03-16, 08:54 PM
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Originally Posted by lightspree View Post
Agreed. Any specific suggestions would be welcomed (some foams may be much better than others, and there may be other materials too...).

Especially for a main hand position on long rides.
for your bar ends, stop by the local motorcyle/dirtbike shop.
couple of bucks gets you a pack of foamy grip covers.
comes in a set of four pieces for handlebars & brake levers.


or just plain old whatever rubbery grips....the black ones
outlasted the bar ends.....one barend broke loose, the bolts
were corroded, had to angle grinder off the bars...
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Old 12-03-16, 10:17 PM
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Road bars, i.e. drop bars have the most hand position and are the most comfortable for that reason. Shimano brifters are safe, comfortable, and easy to use. Specialized S-Wrap Roubaix bar tape is very comfortable and durable. Best I've found. I don't use gel underpadding but some do. Gloves are very important IME. My faves are Bontrager RXL Gel gloves.

Position is the most important element of on-the-bike comfort. Of course the bike needs to be the right size. The saddle must be in the right location to reduce pressure on the hands. The reach must be long enough so that they become levers with hands on the end which go up and down a little. A good long reach also reduces pressure on the hands, which is the opposite of what one frequently reads on the web. The back needs to be straight, from butt to shoulders, the pelvis rolled forward enough to allow that. The upper arms should make a 90 angle with the torso when on the hoods or in the drops. These are the elements of position. They are much more important than exact equipment, though all of the above are tied into bike size, seatpost and saddle choice, and stem length.

https://www.bikeforums.net/road-cycli...discovery.html
Lovely Bicycle!: Drop Bar Hand Positions: an Introduction
https://www.bikeforums.net/road-cycli...l#post12953035
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Old 12-04-16, 06:39 AM
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lightspree, No amount of padding can make up for a handlebar that is fundamentally wrong for the rider. Support items such as the stem length, stem rise or drop, and control pieces (brake levers and shifters) also need to be correctly placed for the individual rider.

Perhaps because of the more relaxed position on my touring bikes than with my roadies I've found out that handlebars that didn't work well on my roadies are just right for the touring bikes. Basically I found I could have a 2 cm narrower span and a non ergo (classic) design for the drops. For my flat bar bikes a moderate sweep and bar ends at the correct angle work well.

Everything should fall naturally to hand, if not you may need to explore another h'bar design or support item. A rider can also help them self by changing hand positions from time to time. Being married to just one position for a long time can cause discomfort even with a well fitting cockpit.

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Old 12-04-16, 06:38 PM
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The Cane Creek bar ends are no longer made. Anybody make something similar?
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Old 12-08-16, 09:30 PM
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Recently installed (thick) Lizard Skins DSP 3.2 tape over Fizik Bar Gel on the drop bar, was very comfy on a 3-day tour. DSP tape is supposed to have good grip when wet.
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Old 12-09-16, 12:02 AM
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Been doing some long rides with new tape, Brooks Cambium Rubber tape. Not egregiously expensive, compare to Lizard Skins etc.

Not super mushy, which I like, but it soaks up vibration really well and feels great when wet. With my Brooks Cambium saddle, it was really nice riding around last week in the pouring rain for 3 days without any issues. I just left the bike out while I did errands and taught, and it was good to go when I got back out.

Another change with the new bike are the extra-wide drop bars. I'm using the maximum 46cm Salsa Cowbell bars, and the drops are flared out. For me, 6'0" and with a short stem, the bars really open up my chest when I'm sprinting or climbing, and I have good control off-road.

This setup is new to me but working great. Wide bars and nice tape. I am glad I didn't get fancy with flat bars or something - traditional is perfect.
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Old 12-09-16, 01:36 AM
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I love nitto noodles. It's the best money i've ever spent on a bike part. I agree with Grant Petersen that contact points are worth spending money on (and i have an acera mech). IMO, narrow bars & tape help you keep a loose grip. I think that's the key to hand comfort. Move em round lots and don't bear down on the bar. It's easy to lapse into a death grip when you're tired, but your hands won't like it.

Downtube shifters or bar ends help because they give your hands & fingers more stuff to do.




post more cockpits please : )
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Old 12-09-16, 04:27 AM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
I have had really good experiences with ESI silicone grips. They make bar tape as well.

The ESI grips/tape are made with a silicone rubber, so they're pretty durable and UV resistant. They don't wear out for a long time, 1+ years in my experience. When they do wear out, new grips are $12. I have also found them to be pretty well insulating, which is good in the winter.

They're also made in the USA, always a plus!

One downside: they are not great for bare hands. I use a pair of gloves with no padding in them. Sweat-on-skin is slippery, same with rain. They are also ABSOLUTELY MISERABLE to get on the bar - I've almost pulled my shoulder sliding them on. Compressed air and windex helps. Once they're on, they don't move without just as much of a fight, so choose your shifter/brake carefully.

Picture below after a 30-day tour in Iceland, and an extra two months of commuting. As you can see by the bar-end, I dropped the bike a couple of times...


Someone always gets grumpy with me when I talk about products, so just FYI, I'm not affiliated with ESI in any way, or ever have been.
With the difficulty of removing those grips, are they better than Ergons or other grips that you have grip by tightening an allen key bolt?
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Old 12-09-16, 10:26 AM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
Been doing some long rides with new tape, Brooks Cambium Rubber tape. Not egregiously expensive, compare to Lizard Skins etc.

Not super mushy, which I like, but it soaks up vibration really well and feels great when wet. With my Brooks Cambium saddle, it was really nice riding around last week in the pouring rain for 3 days without any issues. I just left the bike out while I did errands and taught, and it was good to go when I got back out.

Another change with the new bike are the extra-wide drop bars. I'm using the maximum 46cm Salsa Cowbell bars, and the drops are flared out. For me, 6'0" and with a short stem, the bars really open up my chest when I'm sprinting or climbing, and I have good control off-road.

This setup is new to me but working great. Wide bars and nice tape. I am glad I didn't get fancy with flat bars or something - traditional is perfect.
I don't buy into the wide bars on a "road" bike thing, nor do many of the top Euro CX racers who have a vested interest in a) bike handling and b) breathing ability. I went from 46's last year to 42's this year, I'm 6-4, didn't effect my handling better or worse nor did it 'open up my chest', seemed to be about the same.

What I couldn't test is the relative long term comfort. I think there is something to fitting bars to your body though, it stands to reason that the wider your shoulders the wider the bars, and vice versa. Use them for a few years and figure out what works based on experience.
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