Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Refective Caution Sign...FYI

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Refective Caution Sign...FYI

Old 11-19-16, 06:10 AM
  #1  
Chuck Naill
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: US
Posts: 478
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 269 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Refective Caution Sign...FYI

This appears to be getting drivers attention. I use it with blinking lights.
https://www.amazon.com/Bud-8512A-Jog...VGG2754P6ZD2M9
Chuck Naill is offline  
Old 11-19-16, 10:56 AM
  #2  
robow
Senior Member
 
robow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 3,558
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 433 Post(s)
Liked 127 Times in 89 Posts
Also in the department of wanting to be seen, this summer I purchased a Bontrager Flare R red tail light which has a daylight strobe mode, and this is a real game changer. If the topography allows, a motorist can see you almost 1 mile up the road during the light of day, well before they can see what you are. It is rechargeable and lasts about 4-5 hours in this mode. Other modes allow for longer running times but of course at a diminished intensity. I think everyone in our cycling group added one to their arsenal this summer.
robow is offline  
Old 11-19-16, 11:10 AM
  #3  
10 Wheels
Galveston County Texas
 
10 Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: In The Wind
Posts: 31,871

Bikes: 2010 Catrike Expedition, 02 GTO, 2011 Magnum

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1003 Post(s)
Liked 487 Times in 246 Posts
They seem to work if one is close.

Bright Tail Light on strobe is best.



__________________
Fred "The Real Fred"

10 Wheels is offline  
Old 11-19-16, 01:01 PM
  #4  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 8,214

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, Perfekt 3 Speed -age unknown, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2256 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 521 Times in 426 Posts
Originally Posted by Chuck Naill View Post
This appears to be getting drivers attention. I use it with blinking lights.
https://www.amazon.com/Bud-8512A-Jog...VGG2754P6ZD2M9
That triangle looks like the same one that the Adventure Cycling Assoc issued to us when I did a trip with them.

I often use a flashing light in daytime in the back but it is dim enough that a pair of AAA batteries will last a week. I usually have two lights on my back rack, but only use one unless it is overcast or foggy. One of my lights quit working on my last tour, thus the spare became the primary.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
20IMGP3449.jpg (99.3 KB, 188 views)
File Type: jpg
20IMGP3535.jpg (93.4 KB, 189 views)
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 11-19-16, 03:07 PM
  #5  
wahoonc
Membership Not Required
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Posts: 16,855

Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
I used to wonder about the effectiveness of flashing lights during the daytime. I am about convinced they aren't a bad idea. I drive a fair bit on secondary roads, there is one I use regularly that is also used by quite a few people that appear to be out on training rides. The ones that run the front and rear flashing lights are quite a bit more visible at distance. Of course some are wearing gray or black jerseys that aren't visible at all. You also have to hope that driver's are actually paying attention to the road and what's on it too.

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline  
Old 11-19-16, 04:02 PM
  #6  
Chuck Naill
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: US
Posts: 478
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 269 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I also got one of these. https://www.amazon.com/Active-Arlo-R...ing+vest&psc=1




I run tail and front lights day and night. I read that a flashing light is hard for a driver to judge distance. I thought the caution triangle might help them judge better. I tend to ride for the scenery and contemplation so knowing I am seen gives me some piece of mind. Having two tail light going is insurance if one stopped working.


Thanks for the replies all.

Last edited by Chuck Naill; 11-19-16 at 04:07 PM.
Chuck Naill is offline  
Old 11-20-16, 10:55 AM
  #7  
pdlamb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 6,776

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1553 Post(s)
Liked 748 Times in 467 Posts
A friend got us some before our TransAm, and I rode an ACA tour which supplied and required them. Unless the tour operator's requiring it, I figure they might be useful in fog, rain, or overcast. So are brightly colored shirts or jackets -- yellow, high-vis green or orange.

On one foggy, forested climb, I came up behind a guy who was running eight (8) rear flashers. I noticed them when I was about to pass him, but the green jacket he was wearing had caught my eye 4-5 times further back.
pdlamb is offline  
Old 11-20-16, 12:28 PM
  #8  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 8,214

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, Perfekt 3 Speed -age unknown, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2256 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 521 Times in 426 Posts
Originally Posted by Chuck Naill View Post
...
I run tail and front lights day and night. I read that a flashing light is hard for a driver to judge distance. ...
Agree on distance perception, I do not use the taillight in flash mode at night, then I have it in constant on. Or if it is foggy I might run one in flash mode and one constantly on. But during daytime I use flash mode thinking that once I got their attention with my light that my high vis color jacket or jersey should be enough for depth perception.

Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
...
On one foggy, forested climb, I came up behind a guy who was running eight (8) rear flashers. I noticed them when I was about to pass him, but the green jacket he was wearing had caught my eye 4-5 times further back.
I have no idea who owns the bike on the right in the attached photo, I saw it and had to snap a photo of it.

I used to commute by car through a large college campus. I was often really surprised at how supposedly smart people would have a red LED light clipped to a backpack and aimed towards the sky. A lot of bikers do not make sure that their lights are aimed towards the rear at a car driver eye height. A rack, frame, or seatpost mount is necessary for a light to retain good aim.

Red LED lights also are quite dim when people do not change the batteries as often as they should. I use rechargeable NiMH batteries and on a bike tour I usually recharge them weekly, even if they still look reasonably bright.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
25IMGP6870.jpg (99.1 KB, 133 views)
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 11-20-16, 01:40 PM
  #9  
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Left Coast, Canada
Posts: 4,949
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2116 Post(s)
Liked 1,178 Times in 638 Posts
I found this at 3 Valley Gap near Revelstoke

Happy Feet is online now  
Old 11-20-16, 04:45 PM
  #10  
arctos
40 yrs bike touring
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Santa Barbara,CA.
Posts: 1,020

Bikes: Bruce Gordon Ti Rock N Road [1989], Fat Chance Mountain Tandem [1988], Velo Orange Neutrino (2020)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Ten years ago I had a 12 inch by 24 inch rack top stuffer made with six outside side pockets, a rear positioned reflective triangle and slot for a flashing rear light in the center of the triangle. About 50L of storage capacity when using a 50 liter dry bag as a waterproof liner. Two sewn on straps with Fastex buckles hold it securely to the rack on and off pavement.
Mostly clothing and sleeping gear in the dry bag with pockets filled with tubes, wind vest or shirt, sunscreen and snacks. And rain gear just inside the drawstring front closure for easy access. I have been pleased with this modern update of something i have been using for decades in a smaller size. I only use one of these stuffers in the rear rack without panniers and use small panniers up front.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/carous...rks/2212533641

Last edited by arctos; 11-20-16 at 04:47 PM. Reason: photo would not load directly
arctos is offline  
Old 11-20-16, 08:49 PM
  #11  
Ty0604
Banned.
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 1,155

Bikes: 2017 Fuji Jari

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 227 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
I often use a flashing light in daytime in the back but it is dim enough that a pair of AAA batteries will last a week. I usually have two lights on my back rack, but only use one unless it is overcast or foggy. One of my lights quit working on my last tour, thus the spare became the primary.
What brand of batteries are you using? Mine takes two AA batteries and usually only change them once during a 3 month tour. I run them ~8 hours a day. Duracell.

Originally Posted by wahoonc View Post
I used to wonder about the effectiveness of flashing lights during the daytime. I am about convinced they aren't a bad idea.
I run mine on tour. I don't use my front light though much, only twice on my last 3+ month tour. My rear light, which is attached to my roadside pannier, stays on the fastest flash mode while riding during the day.
Ty0604 is offline  
Old 11-21-16, 05:33 AM
  #12  
wahoonc
Membership Not Required
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Posts: 16,855

Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
Agree on distance perception, I do not use the taillight in flash mode at night, then I have it in constant on. Or if it is foggy I might run one in flash mode and one constantly on. But during daytime I use flash mode thinking that once I got their attention with my light that my high vis color jacket or jersey should be enough for depth perception.

Ditto, during daylight there is enough visible body mass to allow for proper depth perception, assuming they are paying attention and can see

I have no idea who owns the bike on the right in the attached photo, I saw it and had to snap a photo of it.

Sweet! We have a guy that rides one similar to that around here, there is another guy that is using blue LED strips that give him an aura.

I used to commute by car through a large college campus. I was often really surprised at how supposedly smart people would have a red LED light clipped to a backpack and aimed towards the sky. A lot of bikers do not make sure that their lights are aimed towards the rear at a car driver eye height. A rack, frame, or seatpost mount is necessary for a light to retain good aim.

All of my bikes have a Planet Bike SuperFlash mounted on the seat post, that is addition to a fixed tail light of some sort

Red LED lights also are quite dim when people do not change the batteries as often as they should. I use rechargeable NiMH batteries and on a bike tour I usually recharge them weekly, even if they still look reasonably bright.
I like rechargeable stuff, I have a secondary headlight, Serfas True 200 that I keep in my bag as a just in case spare, it is USB rechargeable. Even using my PB Superflash on a regular basis I can go close to a month before the batteries need to be replaced. I always keep a couple spares in my on bike bag.

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline  
Old 11-21-16, 09:53 AM
  #13  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 29,931
Mentioned: 199 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13130 Post(s)
Liked 5,639 Times in 2,900 Posts
Yes. These are standard issue on ACA tours even today.
indyfabz is online now  
Old 11-21-16, 10:33 AM
  #14  
alan s 
Senior Member
 
alan s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 6,946
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1481 Post(s)
Liked 175 Times in 116 Posts
Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
Dang! Just how many kitchen sinks do you need?
alan s is offline  
Old 11-21-16, 10:57 AM
  #15  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 8,214

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, Perfekt 3 Speed -age unknown, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2256 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 521 Times in 426 Posts
Originally Posted by Ty0604 View Post
What brand of batteries are you using? Mine takes two AA batteries and usually only change them once during a 3 month tour. I run them ~8 hours a day. Duracell.
....
I am not sure if my taillights are half watt or one watt, but in flash mode they take less power than that. My taillights use AAA batteries. Yet they still are bright enough that it would be impossible to get three months out of them. Sometimes I used Kodak NiMH and sometimes Eneloop NiMH. Since I use rechargeables, I think they only have about half the life of non-rechargeables.

The Planet Bike Superflash is a popular light, that is half watt and says that it will get up to 100 hours. So, that is probably 50 hours on NiMH batteries.
SuperFlash

Thus, my week of use is not too far out of line if I am running a taillight for 6 to 8 hours a day.

You mentioned you use AA batteries. I think AA batteries have roughly two to two and a half times as much power as AAA batteries. I used to use a VistaLight that used AA batteries. They lasted a long time, but that light was not as bright as the newer lights I now use. I still have a VistaLight on one bike, but it is so dim compared to the others that I only use it at night as a second light.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 11-21-16, 12:45 PM
  #16  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 29,931
Mentioned: 199 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13130 Post(s)
Liked 5,639 Times in 2,900 Posts
Originally Posted by alan s View Post
Dang! Just how many kitchen sinks do you need?
You might be surprised at how much group cooking stuff you can end up with on an ACA self contained tour. When I did their Northern Tier tour with 13 people, we had 4 32 oz. MSR fuel bottles and 3 Coleman Peak stoves. I carried one of the two large pots with a lid that doubled as a frying pan. That pot alone was bulkier than the cook set I carry today. (All my cooking utensils except for my paring knife, olive oil, spices, sponge, corkscrew, etc., fit inside the nesting pots.) We had a third pot that was even larger. Then there was one or two additional frying pans, a tarp to cover stuff left out on picnic tables, a water bladder that I think was at least 5 gallons, and a large mesh bag with common food prep utensils, including a cutting board. That's on top of the personal eating and drinking gear each person had to bring. And since you don't always camp near a grocery store, you sometimes have to carry groceries for dinner, and breakfast and lunch the next day. The load can add up.
indyfabz is online now  
Old 11-21-16, 01:17 PM
  #17  
alan s 
Senior Member
 
alan s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 6,946
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1481 Post(s)
Liked 175 Times in 116 Posts
Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
You might be surprised at how much group cooking stuff you can end up with on an ACA self contained tour. When I did their Northern Tier tour with 13 people, we had 4 32 oz. MSR fuel bottles and 3 Coleman Peak stoves. I carried one of the two large pots with a lid that doubled as a frying pan. That pot alone was bulkier than the cook set I carry today. (All my cooking utensils except for my paring knife, olive oil, spices, sponge, corkscrew, etc., fit inside the nesting pots.) We had a third pot that was even larger. Then there was one or two additional frying pans, a tarp to cover stuff left out on picnic tables, a water bladder that I think was at least 5 gallons, and a large mesh bag with common food prep utensils, including a cutting board. That's on top of the personal eating and drinking gear each person had to bring. And since you don't always camp near a grocery store, you sometimes have to carry groceries for dinner, and breakfast and lunch the next day. The load can add up.
Sounds like a blast. All that instead of a cup-o-noodles and granola bar.
alan s is offline  
Old 11-21-16, 01:42 PM
  #18  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 29,931
Mentioned: 199 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13130 Post(s)
Liked 5,639 Times in 2,900 Posts
Originally Posted by alan s View Post
Sounds like a blast. All that instead of a cup-o-noodles and granola bar.

A cup of noodles and a granola bar ain't gonna get you over the North Cascades highway in the snow.


I can honestly say that I have never once eaten Ramen noodles or the like on a bike trip. Not once. Never ever.
But this summer I did see a guy crossing the country with an entire case of Ramen strapped to the large pile of other stuff he had strapped to his rear rack. There had to be at least 20 packages. Maybe as many as 40. The crazy part about it was that, for the last several days, they had been passing through areas with good grocery sources, and they would continue to do so for several more days. Wish I had taken a photo. Had to be the unstable looking load I had ever seen.
indyfabz is online now  
Old 11-21-16, 01:57 PM
  #19  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 8,214

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, Perfekt 3 Speed -age unknown, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2256 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 521 Times in 426 Posts
Originally Posted by alan s View Post
Sounds like a blast. All that instead of a cup-o-noodles and granola bar.
The trip I did (the source of the photo that received your comment on sinks) had a guide that said his main role during grocery shopping trips was to make sure that we had enough food that nobody got less than they wanted.

They split us up into food groups of three and each group cooked for a day. Our equipment list was a bit different than the list offered by Indyfabz, but it was essentially what was necessary to cook for a group of sixteen. The community gear I carried and my own personal food gear was greater in volume than I carried on my last solo tour.

I suspect your comment on kitchen sinks was more of an observation that almost all the bikes had four panniers and a bag of more stuff on top in back. It is my experience that this forum has an unusually large population of ultra light campers than I have generally seen out on most bike tours. Of the sixteen in that group, I remember one did not have front panniers but instead had the giant sized Arkel panniers in back, one had only rear panniers on his Bike Friday, two Bike Fridays towed trailers, and there was one trike that towed a trailer. I think the remaining eleven bikers (including me) had four panniers and a bag on top in the back.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 11-21-16, 02:02 PM
  #20  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 8,214

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, Perfekt 3 Speed -age unknown, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2256 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 521 Times in 426 Posts
Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
A cup of noodles and a granola bar ain't gonna get you over the North Cascades highway in the snow.


I can honestly say that I have never once eaten Ramen noodles or the like on a bike trip. Not once. Never ever.
But this summer I did see a guy crossing the country with an entire case of Ramen strapped to the large pile of other stuff he had strapped to his rear rack. There had to be at least 20 packages. Maybe as many as 40. The crazy part about it was that, for the last several days, they had been passing through areas with good grocery sources, and they would continue to do so for several more days. Wish I had taken a photo. Had to be the unstable looking load I had ever seen.
When I did my Pacific Coast trip with a friend a few years ago, I brought a couple Ramen packets as emergency food in case we did not find a grocery store. One day when cooking up a one pot meal, I was a bit hungrier than usual and threw in a Ramen packet into the pot for more calories. After that I think every time we cooked up a one pot meal (which was most of them), we threw a Ramen packet in as extra filler to add to whatever else we were cooking that day.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 11-21-16, 02:33 PM
  #21  
Philly Tandem
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: SE Penna., USA
Posts: 1,138

Bikes: Too many! Santana tandems and triplet; MTBs; touring bikes

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 76 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 5 Posts
I have a Dinotte red taillight (older model). Way brighter than any of the other taillights I've seen (I have a few others, too, like the Planet Bike Superflash, etc.). Love it! Pricey, but it really puts out the light.

And on an unrelated note, I actually like the cheap ramen noodles!
Philly Tandem is offline  
Old 11-21-16, 02:49 PM
  #22  
alan s 
Senior Member
 
alan s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 6,946
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1481 Post(s)
Liked 175 Times in 116 Posts
Originally Posted by Philly Tandem View Post
And on an unrelated note, I actually like the cheap ramen noodles!
Nothing quite like salt and carbs to keep you going. I prefer the noodles in cups, which don't require any clean up, other than licking the spork really well. They are good as extra calories to your main meal or as a quick hot meal on the road.
alan s is offline  
Old 11-21-16, 03:00 PM
  #23  
alan s 
Senior Member
 
alan s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 6,946
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1481 Post(s)
Liked 175 Times in 116 Posts
Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
Our equipment list was a bit different than the list offered by Indyfabz, but it was essentially what was necessary to cook for a group of sixteen.
Count me out. No way would you ever find me cooking and cleaning for 16 people on a bike tour, much less carrying all the cooking gear and food, no matter how wonderful they are. Too much of a chore. I'd just offer to pay for a restaurant when my turn came up.
alan s is offline  
Old 11-21-16, 03:49 PM
  #24  
bootskelsey62
Bike nutz for 45+ years
 
bootskelsey62's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: SW Indiana
Posts: 27

Bikes: Which one?

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
My wife and I switched to road workers vests two years ago. Those seem to really get drivers attention! I'm sure it makes some mad after the figure it out, but the sure give us a wide birth! Just go to the local industrial supply house an ask what the local road worker wear! PS, my tail lamp is a Trelock steady that runs full time off of my hub dyno & freeze dried Mountain House.....yum!
bootskelsey62 is offline  
Old 11-21-16, 05:20 PM
  #25  
Ty0604
Banned.
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 1,155

Bikes: 2017 Fuji Jari

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 227 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
I am not sure if my taillights are half watt or one watt, but in flash mode they take less power than that. My taillights use AAA batteries. Yet they still are bright enough that it would be impossible to get three months out of them. Sometimes I used Kodak NiMH and sometimes Eneloop NiMH. Since I use rechargeables, I think they only have about half the life of non-rechargeables.

The Planet Bike Superflash is a popular light, that is half watt and says that it will get up to 100 hours. So, that is probably 50 hours on NiMH batteries.
SuperFlash

Thus, my week of use is not too far out of line if I am running a taillight for 6 to 8 hours a day.

You mentioned you use AA batteries. I think AA batteries have roughly two to two and a half times as much power as AAA batteries. I used to use a VistaLight that used AA batteries. They lasted a long time, but that light was not as bright as the newer lights I now use. I still have a VistaLight on one bike, but it is so dim compared to the others that I only use it at night as a second light.
I stand corrected; My tail light takes 2 AAA batteries, not AA. I get 6-8 weeks out of the batteries I use running the light 6-8 hours a day on the quickest of the 2 flash modes. They're not rechargeable. Duracell Procell. Picked them up in a 2 pack from the Dollar Store. Other store brand AAA's will get me 4-6 weeks.

It's a Bell Apella and I believe 4 lumens based on the info I could find online.
Ty0604 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.