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Carrying a Day's Worth of Water

Old 12-23-16, 08:14 PM
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Carrying a Day's Worth of Water

I'm thinking about carrying a few different collapsible bottles (something like a Platypus) in case one springs a leak or something. Anybody have any specific brand recommendations there?
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Old 12-23-16, 08:33 PM
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Originally Posted by DXchulo
I'm thinking about carrying a few different collapsible bottles (something like a Platypus) in case one springs a leak or something. Anybody have any specific brand recommendations there?
What's your setup like? I use a Camelbak personally. If you don't want to carry a bag on your back put the bladder into a pannier or handlebar bag etc.

I don't know anything about collapsible bottles though. Never used them.
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Old 12-23-16, 09:32 PM
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I like my Platypus bag, two liter size. Its seen so much travel that its looking rough, but still holding up.
Other bags I have are some that I picked up cheap. H2O Lite 1 L | Soft - Sided Bottles | Beverages & Partyware | Shop Not really recommending these, though the drip free caps are neat, but I think almost any brand will do.

In the past I have used MSR dromedary bags. They were some of the first made, and I think still the toughest. Slightly more awkward to use, but I still have one in a dark color that I sometimes take to heat water in by leaving it in the sun, or just pouring boiling water into, to use as a camp shower.

One of the benefits of a bag is that when traveling with your stuff packed in a plane, bus or car they take up very little room empty. Also, the soft form lets them pack into a bag with less lost space when full. I don't drink out of them when riding, I use hard bottles for that, but just store my extra drinking, cooking and cleaning water in them for wild camping.
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Old 12-23-16, 10:12 PM
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For touring with my partner, I use a 6L MSR Dromedary. Very durable and leak-proof, lots of tie-downs to strap it to a rack or bag, and it doesn't weigh much. 6L is enough for solo riding in arid environments, too, if coupled with another bottle or two.
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Old 12-23-16, 10:36 PM
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re the MSR bags, how have you two found the taste-do they have a horrible rubbery taste to them. Someone in an outdoor store told me they did, but my only experience has been with a camelback from a long long time ago, at least 10 maybe 15 years ago and it had a horrible taste to the water that never really went away. I stopped using it due to this.

I have read that more recent things are better, and have looked at both of the MSR bags, the thicker black one and the thinner lighter red one, and they do look interesting.

just would like to hear if you guys have gripes about taste (althought I do realize this is somewhat subjective).
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Old 12-23-16, 10:48 PM
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I changed from 3 L to 2 L because of the space it would fit into, for backpacking mainly. Brought it but did not use it on the bicycle. Platypus if I remember. You might not need the hose.

Last edited by Squeezebox; 12-24-16 at 09:49 AM.
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Old 12-23-16, 11:34 PM
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Originally Posted by djb
re the MSR bags, how have you two found the taste-do they have a horrible rubbery taste to them. Someone in an outdoor store told me they did, but my only experience has been with a camelback from a long long time ago, at least 10 maybe 15 years ago and it had a horrible taste to the water that never really went away. I stopped using it due to this.

I have read that more recent things are better, and have looked at both of the MSR bags, the thicker black one and the thinner lighter red one, and they do look interesting.

just would like to hear if you guys have gripes about taste (althought I do realize this is somewhat subjective).
I have not found a poor taste from Camelbak, MSR, or Platypus and I've probably been through 15 different soft bottles, over the last five years.

A little bit of lime juice mixed into a bladder prevents the growth of bacteria, tastes refreshing, and keeps scurvy at bay.
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Old 12-24-16, 12:40 AM
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Originally Posted by mdilthey
.....and keeps scurvy at bay.
Spoken like a true adventurer.

I carry an MSR dromedary as well( as needed, black), and it did impart a nasty taste to the water at first. But with a bunch of washing and rinsing and repeated use it has faded. I appreciate the durability, the tie downs and the shower attachment. Hang it in the sun in the morning, get a warm shower in the afternoon. Great piece of gear imo.

Last edited by psy; 12-24-16 at 12:49 AM.
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Old 12-24-16, 01:37 AM
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I'm patiently waiting for the Fontus Self Filling Water bottle to come out

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/f...port-camping#/

fontus.at

Unfortunately I missed the initial Indiegogo offer, but hopefully future versions will actually be cheaper. And.. maybe we'll get summer reviews in the NW.

Until then, I guess it depends on where I ride. Last year for my 4 day trip, I had 2 large bike water bottles, and a third quart bottle strapped to my load.

I'm opportunistic when I find water, and am often not too awfully far from a river or stream.

I think I pumped stream water twice using my filter, and twice got unfiltered water from very small streams. The biggest waterborne illness around here is Giardia, and I know other family members have been exposed to it, so it is quite possible I have the antibodies.

Other trips take me through towns and parks where I can usually find water (and thus no need for greater capacity, or the filter).

One very HOT summer trip, I did take a camelbak, and it was nice (I still refilled both bottles and the camelbak a couple of times a day).
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Old 12-24-16, 04:03 AM
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When doing unsupported touring in Australia, I used wine-box bladders. At 5L each, and cost-free (after emptied of their original wine, and washed out with baking soda and rinsed) they have worked well, were durable, and when squashed empty they took up little space.
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Old 12-24-16, 04:31 AM
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Thanks for the comments about the taste with the MSR bags, sounds like my experience has been dealt with over the years.
Both of the MSR models look like good products and are rather compact.
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Old 12-24-16, 05:39 AM
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I have used MSR, Platypus, and some no name ones. They all were OK and I really had no complaints with any of them.

I usually take MSR or Platypus ones backpacking. That said, for bike touring I only take whatever capacity I will need every day and then supplement it with recycled sport drink or bottled water bottles that are picked up or discarded as needed. That may mean only taking the two bottles in the cages on my frames and maybe one 1 or 2 liter bladder. If I will be out in 100 F heat for long section without resupply options I put scrounged plastic bottles in my bags and fill my jersey pockets or use a very small backpack if necessary. When I am back where resupply is more frequently possible the scrounged bottles go in the recycle or trash bin.
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Old 12-24-16, 05:49 AM
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Your perception about multiple smaller bottles is spot-on. You do not want all your water in one container, especially in a desert environment. Ever camped near whitethorn acacia? It will pierce a Gatorade bottle.

Ditto the recommendation for the 2+ liter Platypus, no hose. Get two of those and two bottles on frame. They are about $10 each, weigh just over an ounce empty, and pack very easily when empty.

And replace the standard frame bottles with repurposed 1-liter soda bottles--more capacity for a fraction of the weight, no leaks, no cost, and easy to replace along any road. Some bike frames can fit a 1.5-liter bottle, and some cyclists who don't use panniers will mount two of those on the front fork.
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Old 12-24-16, 06:18 AM
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My normal touring setup starts with the frame bottles (2L) and a Camelbak (3L). I also have a Sea to Summit bag (4L) and MSR bag (6L) that I take on some trips. Those are most often used not to carry water during the day, but instead to fill up not long before camping somewhere and have enough water for overnight camping.

On this trip, I've also become a fan of the Sawyer water filter. A pump type filter worked further north when I pumped water from streams and lakes, but the Sawyer is lighter and also works well screwed onto a used soda bottle: https://www.rei.com/product/890900/s...i-water-filter
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Old 12-24-16, 06:45 AM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK
I'm patiently waiting for the Fontus Self Filling Water bottle to come out

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/f...port-camping#/

fontus.at

Unfortunately I missed the initial Indiegogo offer, but hopefully future versions will actually be cheaper. And.. maybe we'll get summer reviews in the NW.

Until then, I guess it depends on where I ride. Last year for my 4 day trip, I had 2 large bike water bottles, and a third quart bottle strapped to my load.

...snip....
Solar powered water collectors will never work on a bike.

It's good that you didn't put any money in, it's a scam. I posted in another thread:

Originally Posted by smarkinson
Won't help you know but someone is making a water bottle that fills itself using moisture in the air.
Self-Filling Water Bottle Converts Humid Air into Drinkable H2O

Unfortunately, it can't possibly work at that size and that rate of water collection. It's just another kickstarter / indie gogo project that's bogus.


See:
Is the Fontus Self Filling Water Bottle a Scam? This Evidence Suggests So


To condense that much water via solar powered refrigeration would require way more power than would fit on a bike.

The video rant linked in the story is really great!

I saw a previous video rant that calculated the amount of air needed to draw through the device. Not only is the power way too low, the airflow is way too small.
Here's the video, linked from the comments of the original link above. 50,000 liters of air need to have 100% of it's humidity extracted to make 1 liter of liquid water.

And lower humidity air, cold air, or cloudy days make it even slower.

Last edited by rm -rf; 12-24-16 at 07:37 AM.
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Old 12-24-16, 07:53 AM
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I carry two water bottles and a 2L Platypus. For normal riding I just use the water bottles. For camping overnight two full water bottles works fine for me. When very hot, arid, and remote I'll carry extra in the Platypus. For remote camping I'll use the Platypus as a gravity feed supply for filtering water.


Last edited by BigAura; 12-24-16 at 08:13 AM.
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Old 12-24-16, 08:04 AM
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About the msr bag taste issues. I started using them in the early nineties, and there was a pretty bad taste if you left water in them for a long time. Not usually a problem for me as I drink almost twice as much as anyone I have ever camped or toured with. MSR did do a recall in about 95, as the outside of the bag had a chemical leaching problem from the fabric.
I exchanged my bags, and noticed almost no difference.

The early camelbaks had a definite plasticy taste to them. I still think the new ones do. One of the reasons I use Platypus. Even the hydration bags have less taste to them.
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Old 12-24-16, 09:58 AM
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I would not use the same bag for filtered and unfiltered water unless water treatment drops are used.
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Old 12-24-16, 10:14 AM
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Bladders out of wine boxes are cheap , and They're a thing you recycle to use again ..


back to shopping..




...
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Old 12-24-16, 10:43 AM
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I know the talk is about bags but I carry two extra water bottles side by side on top of my rear rack under the sleeping bag. The bag and its tiedowns hold the bottles in place yet I can access them by reaching under the bag from the end.

Last edited by Happy Feet; 12-24-16 at 10:47 AM.
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Old 12-24-16, 11:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Squeezebox
I would not use the same bag for filtered and unfiltered water unless water treatment drops are used.
I'll assume you're referencing my post:

TRUE When backcountry it is indeed a bad idea to mixup dirty-water-bags with clean-water-bags.

BUT there's nothing wrong with rinsing a bag out with tap-water and then carrying fresh tap-water in it. Tap water is already treated with chlorine.
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Old 12-24-16, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by BigAura
I'll assume you're referencing my post:

TRUE When backcountry it is indeed a bad idea to mixup dirty-water-bags with clean-water-bags.

BUT there's nothing wrong with rinsing a bag out with tap-water and then carrying fresh tap-water in it. Tap water is already treated with chlorine.

Is just rinsing out the dirty water bag really gonna get it clean enough? I guess that I do see your point, but a few drops of bleach and let it sit a while is pretty easy for the extra peace of mind.
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Old 12-24-16, 12:22 PM
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For backpacking and bike touring, I carry 3 containers - a Nalgene 1L wide-mouth bottle, and 2x 2L Sawyer or Platypus bladders (1 dirty, to be filtered). For most of the day I only carry 1L (2L Max), but near the end of the day, I try to load on all 5Ls when wild camping. I use 2L (dirty bladder) for an end-of-day shower, 2L for dinner/cocktails/B'fast/dental hygiene and 1L for next morning's ride.

MSR Dromedaries are tough, but I too find they add a taste to the water, and they're big and heavy. Sawyer and Platy bladders are only 1.5oz, but they eventually spring leaks (usually at crease point).
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Old 12-24-16, 01:08 PM
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I don't use plastic bottles because of the risk of BPA endocrine disrupting chemicals. I prefer stainless water bottles for dry desert like conditions but it is difficult to have enough and carry them all.
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Old 12-24-16, 01:48 PM
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Originally Posted by willibrord
I don't use plastic bottles because of the risk of BPA endocrine disrupting chemicals. I prefer stainless water bottles for dry desert like conditions but it is difficult to have enough and carry them all.
It's important to point out that a lot of stainless steel water bottles aren't any safer than plastic bottles. Many of these bottles have plastic caps which can release tiny plastic shavings into the water as you screw the cap on.

You need to find a stainless steel bottle that says "food grade stainless steel." If it's not food grade then it's likely no safer than plastic. Also be aware of bottles that say "stainless steel exterior." Many of these bottles will be stainless steel on the outside with a plastic coated aluminum inside.

Klean Kanteen is the best IMO. They use 100% food grade stainless steel and offer a stainless steel cap instead of plastic.

I use them for car camping. But they're way too heavy for my liking while touring.

Last edited by Ty0604; 12-24-16 at 01:49 PM. Reason: Spelling
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