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Old 04-20-17, 09:54 PM   #1
thepetester
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What NON-cook food do you take for a week?

There is lots of different advice on this that I've already read about but I'm hoping to find out about something that nobody has mentioned.

So far im thinking jerky,trail mix,peanut butter and jelly,and granola.

I'll be travelling for maybe a week with no stove and weight is a primary factor.

Also how much do I REALLY need to carry for a week long ride through the mountains?

Thanks for your help
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Old 04-20-17, 10:27 PM   #2
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Almost nothing.
There is a convenience store every 20 miles.

Last edited by boomhauer; 04-21-17 at 06:18 PM.
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Old 04-20-17, 11:28 PM   #3
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What mountains? How far apart are the towns? Usually it's stop every day at a general store in a small town and get a day's worth of food, two days if you don't know what's coming up tomorrow.
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Old 04-20-17, 11:51 PM   #4
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Well.. there you go.

You'll get 100 different answers from 100 different people.

Assuming you are really off the beaten path and can't resupply for a week I'll share some of what I do:

First.. the math. 7 days x 3 meals = 21 separate meals not including snacks. Lay it out and you can see that's a lot of bulk to pack.

For breakfast I usually eat the same thing because I know it works.. An oatmeal mix. The good thing about instant oatmeal is you don't really need to cook it if you do want to.
I add the following ingredients in sandwich bags and add 1 cup of water in the morning. I have a mark on a water bottle or cup to indicate this amount in camp. Let sit for ten minutes (if hot water) and eat out of bag. I usually just bite a hole in one end and slurp it out. No pot bowl or spoon to wash. With this I pack some Starbucks iced coffee packets because they also just need water and no heat. Add one to a water bottle in the morning and shake for my caffeine fix.



For Lunches in the past I would go for a Ramen type soup (filling, carbs and quick) but these days I am experimenting with homemade nutrient bars. I have been eating two of these for about 2 weeks now for every lunch. I make up a batch on Sunday and that lasts for the week. So.. 7X2= 14 bars for a week.









Dinners are up for grabs I guess. If I wasn't going to cook I would probably work on more variations of my bars and some other stuff. You have to think about total calories expended riding all day vs the weight and bulk of packing all those calories on the bike so it would have to be fairly specific and beneficial food.

I would not discount some types of tinned food if you are not cooking. Tinned tuna is pretty good nutrition/weight as are sardines if you also drink the tomato sauce. Trouble is they smell a lot and can be bear attractants. I'm now a vegetarian so that's out but I did live off that stuff for many years as a climbing bum.

For snacks GORP (good old raisins and peanuts) and granola work well. Again, it's all about nutritional value vs weight if you have to pack it all and can't cook dehydrated foods. Personally, I can forgo taste and variety for a week if there is a bigger goal in mind.

Last edited by Happy Feet; 04-21-17 at 12:02 AM.
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Old 04-21-17, 05:07 AM   #5
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Also how much do I REALLY need to carry for a week long ride through the mountains?
Where are these mountains and are there points to resupply or eat a meal or two?

I carried a week of food on Dalton Highway in AK including stove and that was one full pannier.

When I do no cook elsewhere, it is granola, peanut butter and crackers augmented with convenience store tuna, fruit, etc and occasional meal along the way. However in lower 48 rare to have more than 3 day gap including GDMBR.
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Old 04-21-17, 05:22 AM   #6
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I manage to cook with little enough gear that I wouldn't bother to go cook-less. My last trip the cook gear was 7.1 ounces plus ~12 ounces of fuel. Even when I took a frypan the gear was still only about 12 ounces. It is definitely worth it, to me, to have hot food some of the time.

Also I have generally been able to restock frequently on any road tour and even on off road tours it is usually possible to hit towns for restock now and then. Worst case I'd look into caching food somewhere along the way before I'd carry food for a whole trip.
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Old 04-21-17, 05:57 AM   #7
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I manage to cook with little enough gear that I wouldn't bother to go cook-less. My last trip the cook gear was 7.1 ounces plus ~12 ounces of fuel. Even when I took a frypan the gear was still only about 12 ounces. It is definitely worth it, to me, to have hot food some of the time.

Also I have generally been able to restock frequently on any road tour and even on off road tours it is usually possible to hit towns for restock now and then. Worst case I'd look into caching food somewhere along the way before I'd carry food for a whole trip.
How long does that much fuel last, and how do you re-supply?
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Old 04-21-17, 06:14 AM   #8
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When we tour, we usually stop at a grocery store around about lunchtime.

There, we buy buns, cold cuts, cheese, and tomatoes etc. to make sandwiches for lunch. We also get yogurt or ice cream or something like that for dessert.

So we have a pretty good and filling lunch.

We also buy things for dinner that night. Rowan usually cooks, but if we were travelling without a stove, we'd probably pick up more sandwich-like items.

We also buy things for breakfast ... muesli, cakes, pastries, etc.

And we buy some snacks ... fresh fruit, granola bars, cookies, maybe some raw veggies, cheese and crackers.

We have usually been able to do this each day.

But it does depend where you are and what's available.
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Old 04-21-17, 06:25 AM   #9
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Also how much do I REALLY need to carry for a week long ride through the mountains?
Depends on several factors. Could be nothing or it could be food for an entire week. You have not supplied details so any advice/opinions will be based on speculation.
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Old 04-21-17, 06:30 AM   #10
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How long does that much fuel last, and how do you re-supply?
How long it lasts varies pretty widely depending on how much I cook vs eating cold stuff and also on what I cook. Probably a week on average, but sometimes I may go a good bit longer.

On road tours where there are always towns, I find I can generally pick up a bottle of Yellow Heet at any big box store, any automotive store, any gas station, and most quick marts and general stores. Not sure, but I am told the now ubiquitous dollar stores often have it too.

Even off road touring or backpacking I try to never carry more than a few days of supplies at a time. If hitting towns or outposts isn't an option I am likely to try to cache food somewhere along the way. Where that isn't possible I am likely to just plan a different route.
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Old 04-21-17, 07:04 AM   #11
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How long it lasts varies pretty widely ...

On road tours where there are always towns, I find I can generally pick up a bottle of Yellow Heet at any big box store, any automotive store, any gas station, and most quick marts and general stores....

Even off road touring or backpacking I try to never carry more than a few days of supplies at a time...
Thanks for your reply. I couldn't remember how we did it back when actively touring.
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Old 04-21-17, 07:20 AM   #12
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Of course the temperature will affect perishables.
Happy feet -- Are you willing to share your bar recipes?
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Old 04-21-17, 07:25 AM   #13
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if you count calories, figure a minimum of 3000 per day, and 4000 is better---you can carry food a lot more easily than you can carry on after running out of food.

Fluids are bulkier, heavier, and more important. Three days without food and you will only think of food. Three days without water and you will die. At least you won't be thinking about how hungry you are.
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Old 04-21-17, 07:26 AM   #14
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I'm a huge fan of stoveless travel, just because I don't like camp cooking. My traveling got more fun and carefree when I left the stove at home. I can't believe how long it took me to figure that out--decades!

My preferred packed food is muesli (I mix mine in front of the grocery store in a ziplock bag, having just bought oats, walnuts, and raisins), tortillas with cheese and/or peanut butter, Fig Newtons, crackers, more nuts and dried fruit. Instant potatoes and couscous will reconstitute in cold water in a pinch. Ramen are already cooked (in nasty oil) and can be eaten as a 300-calorie snack. I usually pack a piece of fruit or raw veg for every day, which fools me into thinking I'm being healthy about it.

It helps me to stop thinking about the concept of "meals." I eat a substantial snack at every break, at a maximum interval of two hours of cycling. I never get hungry that way. And I enjoy a cooked meal every once in a while at a restaurant.

This is a more general topic, but it also helps to think of calorie density. Fats have twice the calorie density of carbs. But you can't live on fats alone. Carbs contain about 100 Cal/oz, fats about 200 Cal/oz. My packed food averages out to about 125 Cal/oz.
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Old 04-21-17, 11:45 AM   #15
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I like a hard dried salami, fat protein and salt. Dried fruit like apricots and figs, beef jerky too.
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Old 04-21-17, 12:24 PM   #16
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I manage to cook with little enough gear that I wouldn't bother to go cook-less.
+1

1. Esbit tablets One 4g tablet is enough to bring 2 cups to a simmering boil -- i.e. coffee, ramen, hot oatmeal, couscous, etc.; 2 tablets will boil 3-4 eggs solid. I'd think that one person will need 12-16g/day of fuel. Major benefit of Esbit tablets is that there is no need for a fuel bottle or cartridge, no risk of spill, no priming. Downside is that you have to be somewhat patient, and it doesn't work well in windy or very cold conditions. I store the content of opened boxes inside small metal pillboxes. Two of these can be stacked inside the stove stand (below).

2. Evernew stove stand (52g) No need for a stove. A small metal plate to hold the Esbit tablet will do (after looking at dozens of candidates I've settled on the end cap of Pillsbury turnovers )

3. MSR titan kettle (118g). The stove stand, utensils and tablets fit inside with room to spare.
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Old 04-21-17, 12:27 PM   #17
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Cup o noodles. Dehydrated water.
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Old 04-21-17, 01:20 PM   #18
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  • Instant Kool-Aid or Gatorade
  • BREAD
  • Crackers
  • Cookies
  • Salami
  • Fruit and veggies... or dehydrated fruit and veggies.
Oh, and on a recent stoveless trip, I brought a couple of packets of hot chocolate, and managed to bum some hot water off of someone in a camp area.
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Old 04-21-17, 01:53 PM   #19
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...Oh, and on a recent stoveless trip, I brought a couple of packets of hot chocolate, and managed to bum some hot water off of someone in a camp area.
I suppose you could get the calories out of hot chocolate mix by drinking it cold, too. Or sprinkling it on your cereal.

Rolled oats, instant potatoes, instant refried beans, and ramen are all good for either cold or hot, if someone offers you hot water. Conversely, they're good for if your stove breaks or runs out of fuel, or it's buggy and rainy out and you just don't want to cook.
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Old 04-21-17, 02:11 PM   #20
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I suppose you could get the calories out of hot chocolate mix by drinking it cold, too. Or sprinkling it on your cereal.

Rolled oats, instant potatoes, instant refried beans, and ramen are all good for either cold or hot, if someone offers you hot water. Conversely, they're good for if your stove breaks or runs out of fuel, or it's buggy and rainy out and you just don't want to cook.
I did have a camping trip with my parents when it started pouring down rain at the trailhead. So we tried some cold canned Chinese food in the front of the pickup. That DIDN'T WORK

But, yes, many foods can be eaten cold. And, others can be used as flavorings. Although a packet of hot chocolate or perhaps a couple of tea bags don't take up a lot of space/weight.

Oh, add to the list, powdered milk. We also used to have instant pudding for deserts. Takes some prep work, but no cooking.
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Old 04-21-17, 02:39 PM   #21
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It might sound unconventional, but you can buy surplus MRE's (Military Ready to Eat). You might think they sound like the awful rations from BITD but they are actually really good these days!

Different nations have different stuff included in them, and they make civilian ones sold at places like Walmart. https://www.walmart.com/ip/Military-...eals/193912309

They have everything you need even a tiny one use little stove that comes with them and they fit in your backpack.
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Old 04-21-17, 06:32 PM   #22
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Hard to beat peanut butter. It's somewhere around 165 calories per ounce. It's also easy to pack and doesn't really spoil. It also hits the spot when you have a salt craving. I would plan most of my meals around it. You have different PB delivery methods- tortillas, crackers, oats, etc.


I'm riding across the US south to north in June and there are days when I'll want to carry 2-3 days' worth of food. I think that will mainly be peanut butter, tortillas, oats, dried fruit, and Clif Bars. I'll be close to civilization most of the time, but I'm not big on eating out and I don't want to spend more time shopping than I have to.
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Old 04-21-17, 06:52 PM   #23
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I am experimenting with homemade nutrient bars. I have been eating two of these for about 2 weeks now for every lunch. I make up a batch on Sunday and that lasts for the week. So.. 7X2= 14 bars for a week.
Interesting. Would you call this a "satisfying" lunch or an "enough to survive" lunch? Looks healthy, in any case.
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Old 04-21-17, 07:09 PM   #24
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I suppose you could get the calories out of hot chocolate mix by drinking it cold, too. Or sprinkling it on your cereal.
I mix it into my yogurt at work sometimes.
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Old 04-21-17, 10:10 PM   #25
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Cool ideas thanks a lot,I apologize for not specifying,I'll be going through Wyoming and Colorado probably maybe over ti Cali so I'm sure that there will be places to buy food but I want to spend the least amount of money possible so most convenience stores are out for that reason also I want to move as quick as possible sleeping for a few hours then pretty much eating on the move,literally.

Thanks again for all of the great advice.
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