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Interesting little wood burning stove.

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Interesting little wood burning stove.

Old 05-21-17, 07:23 PM
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mtnbud
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Interesting little wood burning stove.

I recieved a little woodburning stove I picked up on Amazon. After trying it out, I have to say it's a nice little stove for $19. It's stainless steel, so it should hold up well. The pieces nest together so it fits inside a standard 32oz camping pot. Trying it out, it's burns hot and clean once it's going producing very little ash. It does leave black on the bottom of the pan, but it could be a nice way to go if you are traveling and camping in the right sort of places.



https://www.amazon.com/Ohuhu-Portabl...ing+wood+stove
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Old 05-22-17, 04:20 AM
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What does it weigh? The link shows two different weights. In one place it says 0.06 pounds (.96 ounces) and in another it shows 14.2 ounces. Other similar stoves claim 12-14 ounces so I doubt the 1 ounce claim. Also it would have to be super thin gauge stainless to only weigh an ounce.

On the other hand they list the shipping weight as 6.4 ounces so if that is correct the stove can't weigh 14.2 ounces.
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Old 05-22-17, 05:31 AM
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Originally Posted by staehpj1 View Post
What does it weigh?
This review says 14.2 ounces:

The Outdoor Gear Review: Ohuhu Stainless Steel Wood Burning Stove - Review
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Old 05-22-17, 06:27 AM
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the amazon lists the correct weight in the description:

  • Crafted with high quality stainless steel which can repaired anywhere in the world by relatively unskilled illiterate farm workers AND village smithys.
  • Pot stability - 3 arms pot support system creates a stable cooking platform and distributes heat evenly.
  • Free & Easy-to-get fuel - can simply use twigs, leaves, pinecones and wood as fuel.
  • Compact and lightweight with carrying case[5.3" x 5.3" x 3", 400g / 14.2 oz] - can simply be tossed in a bag without worry.
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Old 05-22-17, 06:59 AM
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The 14.2 oz might be correct. It's not light being that it's made out of stainless steel. The metal is thick enough to withstand the heat.
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Old 05-22-17, 07:19 AM
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What do you do if all the available wood is wet?
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Old 05-22-17, 07:34 AM
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
What do you do if all the available wood is wet?
Some wood burning stove users that I backpacked with always carried a little wood just in case. It spoils the no need to carry fuel advantage, but it could be done selectively depending on the locale and the weather.
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Old 05-22-17, 07:35 AM
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
What do you do if all the available wood is wet?
Solo stove is also a pretty clever wood burning stove and they sell an accessory alcohol stove as a back up.
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Old 05-22-17, 07:52 AM
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Dry (dead) wood never really gets 'wet' when exposed to normal rainstorm. I use a SOLO woodburning stove quite regularly. I also carry a firestarter. 99% of the time I don't need to use the firestarter if the wood is wet. As long as it is short and thin it will burn.

My main use of a woodburning stove is while sea kayaking. The beaches are littered with sunbleached bits of firewood. I collect this wood also from spots that are affected by low and high tide and even though some of the wood has been wet for hours it does not have an issue with burning.
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Old 05-22-17, 07:57 AM
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There are places where wood fires of any kind are not allowed. And for the wt there are better choices.
Check out wood gassification stove and make your own.
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Old 05-22-17, 09:03 AM
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I've been using this for years:

https://emberlit.com/stoves/emberlit...acking%20stove

There's a titanium version for the gram counters. I bring along a Trangia alcohol burner for those rare times when I can't find try twigs.
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Old 05-22-17, 09:24 AM
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I have a solo stove knockoff and it does work but is sooty as heck, it works but my go to is the MSR Dragonfly. It's heavier for sure but is great for full on cooking.
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Old 05-22-17, 12:03 PM
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wait...I thought SOLO was a knockoff of Bushbuddy. :-) At least that was when I bought it. So now there are knockoffs of Solo? :-)
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Old 05-22-17, 12:26 PM
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Originally Posted by PedalingWalrus View Post
wait...I thought SOLO was a knockoff of Bushbuddy. :-) At least that was when I bought it. So now there are knockoffs of Solo? :-)
No kidding! To think I thought Solo Stove was the originator... In any case many Chinese knock offs can be found on Amazon for <$20. I was willing to "blow" $20 but not >$80 for the Solo and certainly not >$100 for the Bushbuddy..

Now this up scaled version is on my "to build" list. I'll be scrounging around the shop for 16 Ga SS drops until I come up with enough material to make one...


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Old 05-22-17, 05:18 PM
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Originally Posted by edthesped View Post
I have a solo stove knockoff and it does work but is sooty as heck, it works but my go to is the MSR Dragonfly. It's heavier for sure but is great for full on cooking.
The part where it sounds like a rocket/jet engine is a bonus.
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Old 05-23-17, 05:23 AM
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Originally Posted by manapua_man View Post
The part where it sounds like a rocket/jet engine is a bonus.
I spent a couple of years on an air force base so my hearing is pretty shot but yeah it's a bit loud.
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Old 05-23-17, 07:00 AM
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Check out "Rocket stove mass heater" for your house or workshop. DIY. An interesting build. Not portable.
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Old 05-23-17, 08:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Squeezebox View Post
There are places where wood fires of any kind are not allowed.
+1. And many of those burning bans include alcohol fuel stoves for good reason. Granted you have to be some kind of special idiot to start a large forest fire with alcohol but it can be done.

Here are some of the restrictions on fires and fuels that can be in place during fire bans:

Campfires that utilize wood, pressed logs, wood pellets, paper, cardboard, or other solid fuels.

Campfires utilizing solid fuel that do not distribute the flame with a wick.

Alcohol ultralight stoves (these tend to be homemade from aluminum or tin cans and burn rubbing alcohol)

Wood “twig” ultralight stoves

Campfires, lanterns, or stoves that use non-pressurized liquid gas or fuel.
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Old 05-23-17, 09:19 AM
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@mtnbud, I got one of those stoves on eBay. Quite cheap, rather nicely made (I thought) but I haven't had cause to try it out yet. So I have some questions...

What fuel did you use? I understand it has to be hardwood.

Did you smell like smoke afterwards?
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Old 05-23-17, 10:57 AM
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You can get bags of little wood pellets made especially for such stoves. I think they are some kind of compressed hardwood with greater heat content than just random twigs you find in the forest. It allows you to travel into places where fuel may not be abundant, like deserts, prairies or tundra. and its carbon neutral so youre not contributing to climate change.
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Old 05-23-17, 11:42 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
+1. And many of those burning bans include alcohol fuel stoves for good reason. Granted you have to be some kind of special idiot to start a large forest fire with alcohol but it can be done.

"More significantly, though, Dorschner said the federal government will pursue civil restitution for its firefighting expenses, which could run into the millions of dollars."


But in general, I know they are "just twigs", but I am against most cooking setups that require harvesting fuel and dumping ashes, unless in an area that specifically allows it. Even if in a small manner, they still violate "leave no trace".
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Old 05-23-17, 02:53 PM
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Originally Posted by manapua_man View Post
The part where it sounds like a rocket/jet engine is a bonus.
I love my Dragonfly. My Optimus Nova is quieter, but I think it burns more fuel. That could be due to the lack of a second heat reflector like the Dragonfly has. Taking the fly on tour next month. I tend to save the Nova for shorter trips of around a week or so.
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Old 05-23-17, 09:44 PM
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Originally Posted by rhm View Post
@mtnbud, I got one of those stoves on eBay. Quite cheap, rather nicely made (I thought) but I haven't had cause to try it out yet. So I have some questions...

What fuel did you use? I understand it has to be hardwood.

Did you smell like smoke afterwards?
For testing it out home, I used scrap wood from my shop. Pieces of pine with most pieces about 3/4" square and 2" long. The instructions say to make sure the pieces are short enough to be below the vent holes on the wood box. I used it outside on a cement slab and put a cookie tin lid under it to catch the ashes.

The very first time, I put the pot on top as soon as I lit the wood. It brought 2 pints of water to a boil in around 5 to 7 minutes. The second time I tested it, I allowed the wood to be burning well before putting a fry pan on to cook some eggs. I noticed less soot on the bottom of the pan using the second method, but both methods produce soot on the bottom of the pan. The wood burned hot and there was very little noticeable smoke or ashes. I found filling the wood box once was enough to boil the water and cook the eggs, but some reviewers mention having to add wood and caution people to make sure they have their wood supply ready at their side so they don't have to wander around looking for more wood.

I later used it in a campground using small dead twigs from fir trees I picked up around the campsite. I used twigs of mostly thumb diameter as they don't burn up as quickly. I set it on top of the campfire grate so I didn't have to worry about where the ashes would go and boiled water for coffee. The coffee tasted fine with no noticeable taste of smoke. I also didn't notice any smell on my clothing. Hardwood would probably burn slower, but fir and pine worked fine. Certain fuels might not work so well.

(I was surprised that the very bottom of the system stayed fairly cool and the whole thing cooled down fairly quickly once the fire had been out a while.)

Have fun with your stove! I sure hope you get an opportunity to use it on your next adventure!
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Old 05-23-17, 10:22 PM
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
I love my Dragonfly. My Optimus Nova is quieter, but I think it burns more fuel. That could be due to the lack of a second heat reflector like the Dragonfly has. Taking the fly on tour next month. I tend to save the Nova for shorter trips of around a week or so.
I noticed that the Dragonfly seems to use a lot less fuel than most stoves too, but I attribute that more to how easy it is to control the flames on it. The only problem I have with mine is that it packs kind of awkwardly.
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Old 05-24-17, 04:37 AM
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Originally Posted by manapua_man View Post
The only problem I have with mine is that it packs kind of awkwardly.
This is true.
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