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Roswheel Bikepacking saddle bag

Old 08-02-17, 03:57 PM
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nightshade18
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Roswheel Bikepacking saddle bag

Hi folks,

I'm planning a 1200 mile cycle over 12 days and have decided on taking a bikepacking setup over a traditional touring rack and panniers. I'm trying to stick to a budget and have found that a bikepacking saddle bag is one of the more expensive items to pick up.

In my search I've come across the Roswheel bikepacking saddle bag. As a 10l pack, it's available from China for about half the price of more established brands in the Uk (Alpkit and the like). However there's very little in the way of reviews. I wondered if anyone has used one and has any feedback, or knows of alternatives at a similar price point?

ROSWHEEL 131372 Water-resistant 10L Bike Tail Bag Pack -$39.99 Online Shopping| GearBest.com

Much appreciated
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Old 08-02-17, 04:12 PM
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Sorry, I cannot speak for the particular item. I have had good experience with Roswheel little tiny panniers on my bike which I used to hold the LiIon batteries for my lights and 2l rack pack.
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Old 08-03-17, 04:46 AM
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I have no direct experience, and I believe this model has not long come on the market. Interestingly, it is marketed on Aliexpress as being 100% waterproof (at least the same photo is used), so it would be interesting to see what the actual case is. In the aliexpress ad it shows them using it as a water scoop, with the idea being apparently no leakage. If you search on Aliexpress there are also offerings from 'Newbol' and 'Rhinowalk' for saddlebags, the one from Rhinowalk looks the best initially.
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Old 08-03-17, 05:44 AM
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One thing to keep in mind is the size of that bag. I have an 11L saddlebag and I find it tiny for a few day trip. For a 12 day trip you may be much happier with something in the 16-18L size. For my 11L I can fit a warbonnet XL hammock a topquilt and a pillow. A sleeping bag, even a down one will likely eat up that entire 11L.
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Old 08-03-17, 02:17 PM
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Originally Posted by danmyersmn View Post
One thing to keep in mind is the size of that bag. I have an 11L saddlebag and I find it tiny for a few day trip. For a 12 day trip you may be much happier with something in the 16-18L size. For my 11L I can fit a warbonnet XL hammock a topquilt and a pillow. A sleeping bag, even a down one will likely eat up that entire 11L.
Hmm, that's an interesting point. I had planned on coupling it with a frame bag which I have already and a dry bag attached to the handle bars too..... I am planning on going as ultralight at the budget allows, but maybe it won't be enough...
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Old 08-03-17, 02:38 PM
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I've gone ahead an ordered one - too cheap not to try. I'll report back here and let you know how I get on with it.
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Old 08-22-17, 08:52 AM
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Originally Posted by nightshade18 View Post
I've gone ahead an ordered one - too cheap not to try. I'll report back here and let you know how I get on with it.
How did you get on with this bag? Still don't see any reviews of it online
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Old 08-22-17, 09:36 AM
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Roswheel

I have had this bag for several months now and it does the job. Lots of reflective logo, love it or hate it. Fairly easy to attach, same as any other. Now it is not rock solid stable for rooty or rocky singletrack but it was not bought with that intention. I don't plan to jump when I am hauling gear. I use a rubber 2fish style rubber block below it to prevent it from sliding down the post fully loaded. It is worth the money. No tears or damage apparent yet. As for waterproof I can't say as I sprayed mine with camp dry type spray anyway, so far no issues.

Here is another idea for you frugal fellas. Instead of cages up front get these
https://www.amazon.com/Sandwich-Disp...stic+bread+box

Yep, breadbox. Kitty litter pannier inspired, waterproof cheap and with 3 drilled holes and some washer should easily be tough enough for your tent, hammock or inflatable pad.

Kwog
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Old 08-23-17, 01:42 AM
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Originally Posted by coldelamachine View Post
How did you get on with this bag? Still don't see any reviews of it online
It's just arrived.
Initial impression are good, but I've yet to use it on the bike.
I'm on holiday now, but I'll do a weeks worth of commuting once I'm back and report how its gone.
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Old 08-23-17, 03:03 AM
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Thanks for the feedback.
I'll be using it mainly on my road bike, so it sounds like it'll be fine.
I think I'll just go ahead and buy it.
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Old 10-15-17, 02:11 PM
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So I'd forgotten about this thread, but I think it's still worth an update for completeness.
My tour is next year, but I have now commuted with the Roswheel a few times now. So here's my thoughts...

The main thing to say is that it is adequate. One of my main worries was that it would swing around too much, but I haven't found that to be the case. You can pack quite a bit into it, however you need to be careful how you pack; too much weight or pack too loosely and the rear will sag - see the pic below.



So it's certainly usable, you just need to pack carefully. Keep the weight towards the seatpost and pack it with squishy things - the tighter you can pack it, the less sag you get. This means it's not particularly good at carrying shirts to work, but it is great for a sleeping bag.

One last downside is that I ran it on my bike pre-winterising i.e. no mud guards. I was caught out in one heavy shower and whilst it remained dry from the top of the rain, prolonged rooster spray for the rear wheel eventually let some damp through....actually it did a fine job of keeping the spray off me!
It was exceptionally wet though and took an hour of soaking. Now my guards are in place, I'm confident I won't have the same issue.
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Old 10-15-17, 02:50 PM
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Clicked on OP's Roswheel link and current price is $25.99 for next 3 days if anyone is interested
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Old 10-16-17, 03:11 AM
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Thanks for the update, I'd forgotten about the thread too!

I bought one and used for a 4 day trip on the road bike. It was dry so I can't make any comment about how waterproof it it, but I thought it worked really well and it seems really well made. I didn't have any problem with it swinging about even when I was out of the saddle. Definitely agree with the comment about needing to pack it properly.

I bought the handlebar dry bag & harness by the same company (the Roswheel Attack model) and was very pleased with it too.
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Old 10-16-17, 04:34 AM
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It looks as if it would be difficult to swing your leg over it when getting on, or off, the bike.
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Old 10-16-17, 07:19 AM
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It looks like a good deal. I just ordered one. I pack pretty minimalist so I hope the size will work out if supplemented with a good sized bar roll. If not I am not averse to carrying 3 or 4 pounds in a small backpack. I actually use a little backpack sometimes when I really don't need the space.

On my last long tour (ST) I used a 20 liter stuff sack, with the top rolled down a bit, on the rear rack along with a handlebar bag, but things could have compressed more and I carried some stuff that I can leave home.

Can someone comment on how well this bag works when carrying much less than full capacity? Does rolling down the top more make it work well for smaller loads.

Also, if properly stuffed to full capacity will it gracefully carry a stuff sack of light gear on the lashings on top or is that only good for carrying a wind shirt or other very small light clothing items?
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Old 10-16-17, 02:24 PM
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Originally Posted by staehpj1 View Post
It looks like a good deal. I just ordered one. I pack pretty minimalist so I hope the size will work out if supplemented with a good sized bar roll. If not I am not averse to carrying 3 or 4 pounds in a small backpack. I actually use a little backpack sometimes when I really don't need the space.

On my last long tour (ST) I used a 20 liter stuff sack, with the top rolled down a bit, on the rear rack along with a handlebar bag, but things could have compressed more and I carried some stuff that I can leave home.

Can someone comment on how well this bag works when carrying much less than full capacity? Does rolling down the top more make it work well for smaller loads.

Also, if properly stuffed to full capacity will it gracefully carry a stuff sack of light gear on the lashings on top or is that only good for carrying a wind shirt or other very small light clothing items?
I'd say the lighter the load, the better the bag works. It'll roll down a long way - here's a picture of as small as it gets vs. the full bag - it isn't much bigger than a normal saddle bag. There's a rigid piece of the bag that prevents it getting any smaller.





Excuse the poor lighting - it's dark out

As for the top? The lashings are fairly small, you might need to combine them with going round the entire bag. I'd be confident in the fixings to hold more weight, but think you'll likely be limited by the rigidity of what's inside the bag as to how much extra it would support on top. My gut says not a lot more.
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Old 10-16-17, 03:29 PM
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Originally Posted by nightshade18 View Post
As for the top? The lashings are fairly small, you might need to combine them with going round the entire bag. I'd be confident in the fixings to hold more weight, but think you'll likely be limited by the rigidity of what's inside the bag as to how much extra it would support on top. My gut says not a lot more.
Thanks. That gives me a little more of an idea of what to expect. Worst case It will work for day trips when extra clothing might be needed. I look forward to checking it out.
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Old 10-17-17, 07:01 AM
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Originally Posted by 2manybikes View Post
It looks as if it would be difficult to swing your leg over it when getting on, or off, the bike.
I've often wondered about this also regarding bikepacking seat bags. I asked about it on another thread and only got a few replies such as... "lay the bike on the ground, step over it and then raise the bike up" or "bend your knee sharply and lift leg over the top tube", neither a good option for me. I can barely raise my leg high enough to clear the saddle from behind without the additional height of a bag. Yes, clipping into the left pedal before the swing gives about a 5" head start. but some of those seat bags tower above the saddle.

How do? you get on or off a bike with a high seat bag? With youthful dexterity?

Last edited by BobG; 10-17-17 at 07:27 AM.
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Old 10-17-17, 07:29 AM
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Originally Posted by BobG View Post
I've often wondered about this also regarding bikepacking seat bags. I asked about it on another thread and only got a few replies such as... "lay the bike on the ground, step over it and then raise the bike up" or "bend your knee sharply and lift leg over the top tube", neither a good option for me. I can barely raise my leg high enough to clear the saddle from behind without the additional height of a bag. How do? you get on or off a bike with a high seat bag? With youthful dexterity?
I know laying the bike down or having it almost down, does work. I have a few bikes that are too tall for me. I could not swing my leg over that on a frame that was the correct size for me. My youthful dexterity has been gone for a long time.
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Old 10-17-17, 07:33 AM
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Originally Posted by BobG View Post
I've often wondered about this also regarding bikepacking seat bags. I asked about it on another thread and only got a few replies such as... "lay the bike on the ground, step over it and then raise the bike up" or "bend your knee sharply and lift leg over the top tube", neither a good option for me. I can barely raise my leg high enough to clear the saddle from behind without the additional height of a bag. Yes, clipping into the left pedal before the swing gives about a 5" head start. but some of those seat bags tower above the saddle.

How do? you get on or off a bike with a high seat bag? With youthful dexterity?
it doesnt sound like a high seat bag would be the best idea for you then, a simple rear rack and a set of small panniers used on the rear would be a bit heavier, but not by much and you would avoid the physical problems you have described if the two mounting techniques arent doable for you.

Ive recommended these panniers often, Arkel Dry-Lites, about 20-25litres, only weigh about a pound, and any aluminum rear rack will easily handle these full of clothes etc. An option anyway to think of if you really want to save weight and can't use a large high seat bag.
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Old 10-17-17, 07:33 AM
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Originally Posted by nightshade18 View Post
So I'd forgotten about this thread, but I think it's still worth an update for completeness.
My tour is next year, but I have now commuted with the Roswheel a few times now. So here's my thoughts...

The main thing to say is that it is adequate. One of my main worries was that it would swing around too much, but I haven't found that to be the case. You can pack quite a bit into it, however you need to be careful how you pack; too much weight or pack too loosely and the rear will sag - see the pic below.
Do you happen to have a link to that pic? All I see is a big grey image missing icon, I'd love to see how it actually looks on a bike when packed, not a staged ad photo.
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Old 10-17-17, 07:54 AM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
it doesn't sound like a high seat bag would be the best idea for you then...
Yep, I'm happy with my Bruce Gordon racks and a trunk bag for light loads and Axiom panniers for touring loads. Was just curious how those who do use high seat bags mount their bikes. Possibly the younger riders with more flexibility?
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Old 10-17-17, 12:50 PM
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Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
Do you happen to have a link to that pic? All I see is a big grey image missing icon, I'd love to see how it actually looks on a bike when packed, not a staged ad photo.
Erm.....

https://photos.app.goo.gl/FTNFDfuIlHP9lIqt2

https://photos.app.goo.gl/YhKJunQywnnQ9VqJ3

Do these work? I can see the picture in the thread above, but I'm still finding my way in the post 'photobucket disaster world'!

Both of these were packed loosely though, the sag is better when packed correctly
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Old 10-17-17, 01:08 PM
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Originally Posted by nightshade18 View Post
Do these work? I can see the picture in the thread above, but I'm still finding my way in the post 'photobucket disaster world'!


Yep, thanks! Doesn't look bad, I may have to give one a shot. Much cheaper than buying a bigger Carradice! Trying to get away with just two front panniers and some sort of seat bag on my next CC trip.
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Old 10-17-17, 04:13 PM
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Originally Posted by BobG View Post
Yep, I'm happy with my Bruce Gordon racks and a trunk bag for light loads and Axiom panniers for touring loads. Was just curious how those who do use high seat bags mount their bikes. Possibly the younger riders with more flexibility?
on a trip this year I used a large rack pack, big dry bag thing, on top of my panniers, and I sometimes would forget and catch my foot on it. I think I ended up usually doing the step over thing, I just did what was easiest and intuitive.

My frame has a lower sloping toptube so that helps, but I am in my mid 50s, and don't know if I am more flexible than any other 50 yr old, but I aint fat.

again, if you have limitations, then you will work out what method works best for you. The step over toptube method would certainly be easier with just a seat bag, as you could easily lean the bike. My bike was always kept more or less straight, as I was carrying a hefty load, and like I said, I aint fat.
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