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BEST Touring Bike to Buy 2017/2018

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BEST Touring Bike to Buy 2017/2018

Old 11-18-17, 10:41 AM
  #1  
Juggy_Gales
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BEST Touring Bike to Buy 2017/2018

So, Hi everyone.. I am new to Biking.. I haven't ridden in years.. I just ordered a Giant Toughroad SLR2 as my first Bike to ride wherever.. When I first decided to buy a Bike.. It was an idea to help me get back into shape..
I did not know the route I wanted to go biking wise.. I love the idea of the thrill rides through trails on a mountain bike.. and the idea of high speed on a road bike.. But Wanted something in the middle so I went towards a Hybridish Bike.. Road Oriented with some offroad capability..

But as I started getting myself re-educated with bikes.. via watching videos on components.. types of bikes.. safety.. and various other tips.. I stumbled across videos of people.. Bikepacking and going on long Tours.. Across State, Across Country.. and even Through many countries.. That Got me excited.. Adventure..

I am a bit away from being able to go on such a crazy trip.. I first gotta get myself in shape.. so.. as I work my way up to it.. I'll go on shorter tours.. within city.. and then across the County.. for instance.. I live in the Tampa Bay area in Pinellas County.. It is 30 miles biking 3-5hr pedal from where I live.. to FT Desoto which is a state park, camping ground and Beach.. also the furthest south you can go in Pinellas County.. it is where Tampa Bay Ends and Gulf of Mexico Begins.. My First 'Major' Goal will be to work up to getting to that point.. I know 30miles is nothing to some of you.. may even be your everyday sat afternoon.. lol.. But my fat arse will need to work up to it.


Saying that now that I gave you a lil story.. Down the road when I am more able.. I would love to go on a bigger adventure.. and I think I will probably need to upgrade to a more robust Bike that could handle a long journey.. and or a beating..

What Bikes do you recommend for Touring?

The best I have seen for such a Task are by Surly.. They seem to have everything someone needs to ride anywhere.

Thoughts?
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Old 11-18-17, 11:16 AM
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Co-Motion Cascadia or Americano is my top choice without going full custom. However my response in the other thread was more in depth on lower cost options.
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Old 11-18-17, 11:22 AM
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You should put some miles on your ToughRoad and think about what you like about it and where you feel it's lacking to shape your ideas about your next bike.

and I think I will probably need to upgrade to a more robust Bike that could handle a long journey.. and or a beating..
I don't think that's the area that in which the ToughRoad is lacking, but these are the things you need to spend some time on it to determine.
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Old 11-18-17, 11:23 AM
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that there bike is just fine for touring.

https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/toughroad-slr-2

go ride the hell out of it.
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Old 11-18-17, 12:12 PM
  #5  
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Originally Posted by saddlesores View Post
that there bike is just fine for touring.

https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/toughroad-slr-2

go ride the hell out of it.
Originally Posted by tyrion View Post
You should put some miles on your ToughRoad and think about what you like about it and where you feel it's lacking to shape your ideas about your next bike.



I don't think that's the area that in which the ToughRoad is lacking, but these are the things you need to spend some time on it to determine.
Oh I def plan to, and yes I def will see what I love about the bike and also where it lacks..

Like I said, I am newly getting back into it and there are so many diff choices out nowadays.. I went safe when I went with Giant because I knew of that Manufacturer since I was young.. and even my previous Bike.. The Peugeot Limestone.. Peugeot doesn't seem to make bikes anymore..


As for my concerns about the Toughroad.. They are just about how is the longterm wear of Aluminum vs a hardy steel frame bike?
I will say I love how light the toughroad is.. and I am sure going to ride the hell out of it.. before Id go crazy and buy another new bike so soon. When it is time for a new Bike.. My goal is to build it frame up.

I was just curious what people these days go touring with nowadays..

VeganBikes~
Surly and Co-motion I have been seeing most often. I admit, part of my Draw to Surly is their marketing.. But also how customizable their frames are.
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Old 11-18-17, 02:15 PM
  #6  
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Comprehensive overview in this guide
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Old 11-18-17, 02:44 PM
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There is nothing wrong with the bike you just bought. As others have advised, get on it and ride. After a while you may realise that spending more money will get you absolutely nothing, other than the satisfaction one gets for falling for more marketing fluff.
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Old 11-18-17, 03:05 PM
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[Another Best?] In Theory.. Get a Koga Signature Bike * and Fly to Europe to get it when it's done, they don't ship to USA, no Dealers .

*once the bike is complete, NL factory builds to a menu.. of your choices from their list.. they ship it to a Dealer.. you go get it.

ride away ... bring your gear, but panniers there..


Another <we build it just for you>; Bike Friday , they fit in a Suitcase to make getting to your tour goal easier.

Rohloff hubs an option on both.



...
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Old 11-18-17, 07:05 PM
  #9  
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A lot about eventually buying a more robust bike is really going to revolve around on how much stuff you intend on carrying on a tour. I do not know if you are thinking lighter weight credit card touring, or full loaded with the kitchen type of touring. I am a warm showers host. Recently I had a guy from Portland who was credit card touring with 10-15 pounds of toiletry gear and clothing, on his way to to Texas. He was riding on a full (heavy) touring bike. Why? I do not know. Any regular road bike is just fine for credit card touring. Keep it fun/ keep it light. my advise; " don't torture yourself on a heavy touring bike if its not necessary"
On the other hand, if you end up wanting to do the full loaded type touring, you should eventually consider one. The Giant should be a good way to get started.
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Old 11-19-17, 11:24 AM
  #10  
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Originally Posted by Brian25 View Post
A lot about eventually buying a more robust bike is really going to revolve around on how much stuff you intend on carrying on a tour. I do not know if you are thinking lighter weight credit card touring, or full loaded with the kitchen type of touring. I am a warm showers host. Recently I had a guy from Portland who was credit card touring with 10-15 pounds of toiletry gear and clothing, on his way to to Texas. He was riding on a full (heavy) touring bike. Why? I do not know. Any regular road bike is just fine for credit card touring. Keep it fun/ keep it light. my advise; " don't torture yourself on a heavy touring bike if its not necessary"
On the other hand, if you end up wanting to do the full loaded type touring, you should eventually consider one. The Giant should be a good way to get started.
Im going to start with touring local within 50miles.. and work from there... I guess if I went really long id do a mixture of both.. depending on where, weather, supplies and finances.
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Old 11-19-17, 11:58 AM
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then you dont need "Best" just ride what you own, then do self assessment and think about what you would like..
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Old 11-19-17, 12:06 PM
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Niner RLT 9 steel with bikepacking bags. Such a good looking bike
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Old 11-19-17, 02:50 PM
  #13  
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Originally Posted by Juggy_Gales View Post
As for my concerns about the Toughroad.. They are just about how is the longterm wear of Aluminum vs a hardy steel frame bike?
You can stop worrying on that score. Aluminum hybrids have more in common with steel touring bikes than most people realize: weight saving is not a primary design objective for either category, which means that the designer can concentrate on durability. Giant in particular has built untold millions of hybrids over the years (including the millions of bikes that they have built under contract for other companies); they know how make bikes that last.

Case in point: I've ridden many tens of thousands of on- and off-road miles on my aluminum mountain bike (a 1986 Cannondale) since buying it new. Bent the fork in a crash around 1990, but the frame is still in great shape.
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Old 11-19-17, 05:57 PM
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That bike will be Plenty tough. I bet you can beat the hell out of it and then some. AL isn't in some way naturally weaker than steel for a bike frame. It has other qualities like being less flexible and "harsh" that many don't like. However, you're running big tires, and those will soak up any harshness that the AL might have. I ride an AL touring bike right now because I didn't like how flexable the steel touring I tried was. AL and steel are both fine and tough, just suited for different preferences.

Also, it looks like your bike has mounts for rear racks and even front low rider racks! It's practically a light off-road touring bike as is! Throw on some smoother tires for the road and it's an on-road touring bike! The main difference there is just the drop bars, but plenty of people use flats on touring bikes too. Maybe throw some bar-ends on it for a different hand position option. If I were you I wouldn't worry about getting another bike for a while. Nice bike!
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Old 11-19-17, 06:26 PM
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Originally Posted by mohamilton View Post
Niner RLT 9 steel with bikepacking bags. Such a good looking bike
Wild good-looking, that certainly wouldn't come to mind as 'the best' touring bike.
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Old 11-19-17, 06:37 PM
  #16  
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The best touring bike is a Co-Motion Divide with a Pinion 18 speed gearbox.

/facetious (but that is one fancy looking touring bike)
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Old 11-20-17, 01:56 PM
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The best is obviously the REI ADV 3.1, cause that is what I have.

But seriously, the best is whichever one you have and are comfortable on that can carry your required gear over your intended terrain.

I see no reason the Giant wont work to at least get you started, and get you a bit more info on exactly what you want.

I personally think there are scant few people who need to worry about truly wearing a frame out (opposed to many more who ruin it through neglect)
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Old 11-20-17, 04:35 PM
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Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
But seriously, the best is whichever one you have and are comfortable on that can carry your required gear over your intended terrain.

Close. The best touring bike is the bike you ride when you're touring -- as long as you're comfortable on the bike and you can rely on it.


Capability and bling should be subservient to "what you ride on."
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Old 11-20-17, 07:11 PM
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https://www.cyclingabout.com/best-touring-bikes-list/
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Old 11-30-17, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Wild good-looking, that certainly wouldn't come to mind as 'the best' touring bike.

Ive been touring on the trek 520 - I'm not convinced you need a heavy touring bike.
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Old 11-30-17, 11:23 AM
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Originally Posted by mohamilton View Post
Ive been touring on the trek 520 - I'm not convinced you need a heavy touring bike.
Certainly true- heavy isnt always needed. Bikepacking lends to either very limited gear or 15 different bags all placed on the frame with extreme organization and precision.

There are benefits and drawbacks to both setups. I was just surprised to see someone claim a bike with limited cargo carrying capabilities is 'the best' touring bike.
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Old 12-01-17, 02:41 AM
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You can go bikepacking with that right now. Cheap bags off Ebay and Amazon. Light weight cooking gear, tent and sleeping bag, or use hostels and a credit card, and do it that way. OR cheap light weight racks and panniers and go full touring. A couple hundred bucks either way and your on your way!. Don't forget spares: like tube, puncture kit and leavers, bike tool kit, pump, a couple of water bottles, lights, maybe a helmet etc, and you're on your way.
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