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Is it a good idea to buy a folding all road/adventure bike for touring?

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Is it a good idea to buy a folding all road/adventure bike for touring?

Old 12-04-17, 02:09 AM
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Is it a good idea to buy a folding all road/adventure bike for touring?

I wanna ride a bike through several states( 700-800KG). if during the trip I am so tired I can take the bike onto a bus or some other transport way. Is there any such kind of folding all road bike? I am really looking forward to hearing your comments. thanks!
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Old 12-04-17, 06:22 AM
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I did a group tour with Adventure Cycling about five years ago. Total of 16 riders, three used Bike Friday folding bikes. Of those three, two used the travel case as a trailer, the third had his gear on rear panniers.

I have a folding bike but have not toured on it, although I have considered that.
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Old 12-04-17, 07:23 AM
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A Brompton has rekindled my interests in self supported short touring, but I wouldn't consider it an all-road - I stick to the asphalt on it. For ADV/dirt touring you might want consider the Bike Friday Pocket Llama. Post in the Folder sub-forum for more knowledgeable answers - not many folks tour on folders here.
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Old 12-04-17, 07:44 AM
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Bike Friday makes high quality folding bikes, including a touring model, the New World Tourist. I have owned my NWT for years. I've toured extensively on it, as well as commuted on it. I've folded it and taken it on buses and trains several times on tours. Bike Friday makes a variety of other models.
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Old 12-04-17, 08:34 AM
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I bought a Bike Friday New World Tourist a year ago. I trained on it and then did a month long tour across Western Europe (journal here) on it. While I took it on trains, I didn’t have to fold it to do so. Frankly, it rides like a normal touring bike.

I wrote an article about my search, purchase, training, and touring on it, if you’d like a more detailed discussion of it pluses and minuses.
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Old 12-04-17, 09:49 AM
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For full size bikes, you can consider a bike with S&S couplers, Ritchey Breakaway system, or a Rinko setup. The rules for bikes on trains/buses are often vague enough that the ticket-takers just appreciate some attempt at compacting your bike. The most common rule that they'll impose is that your bike is in a bag (laundry bag, trash bag, garment bag, etc).
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Old 12-04-17, 11:25 AM
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The economics are against any one-off purchase of a new bike. It's fairly easy to get a bike shopped for $50-200 wherever FedEx or UPS operates. The S&S coupled idea runs about $700 for the bike, plus $300-400 for a case (which you'll have to get to wherever you bail out). Bike Fridays start around $2000 for a bike, last I looked.


Check into bikeflights.com or similar outfits for a better choice.
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Old 12-04-17, 11:46 AM
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Originally Posted by pdlamb
The economics are against any one-off purchase of a new bike. It's fairly easy to get a bike shopped for $50-200 wherever FedEx or UPS operates. The S&S coupled idea runs about $700 for the bike, plus $300-400 for a case (which you'll have to get to wherever you bail out). Bike Fridays start around $2000 for a bike, last I looked.
Your post assumes someone will only be sending their bike somewhere on one occasion, and that it will be shipped solely within the USA. That all might be the case for the OP. However, for many other cyclists, that's not the case. I've checked my Bike Friday in its sub-62" suitcase at least 3 dozen times with airlines, many of these times on international flights. I figure I've easily saved over 200% of the cost of my Bike Friday in airline fees. The hassle factor for flying with my bike has gone way down. I've also been able to take it on some buses and trains which would not have allowed a regular bike at any price. Moreover, I've got a bike that I love to ride and which has been my preferred bike for many years.
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Old 12-04-17, 04:23 PM
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Originally Posted by pdlamb
The S&S coupled idea runs about $300-400 for a case (which you'll have to get to wherever you bail out).
Of course you can also use a cardboard box, generally a bit cheaper than 3-400...
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Old 12-04-17, 06:52 PM
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I got a cardboard bike box for free from my LBS. My bike, panniers and ExtraWheel trailer all fit under the 50 pound limit. American Airlines charged $150. If you use a big box, tie a length of paracord around the box near each end, so you and the baggage handlers have a way to grab the box. Use a knot easily untied. And don't overdo the duct tape sealing the box. TSA will almost certainly open it... Or if you are gonna tour a lot, a Bike Friday and case would make sense.
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Old 12-05-17, 01:21 AM
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I'm into off piste touring so got a Ritchey Breakaway Cross bike. Id consider it a light duty touring bike, def not something your going to be packing 50 lbs of gear with, but it will handle 25-30 no problem. Front and rear racks fold flat and can be packed with the bike. Simple drivetrain that easily breaks down. It will fit 42c tires.

Ritchey also has the Ascent which is more of a gravel / drop bar MTB.

The Ritcheys are a lot cheaper than most of the S&S bikes but are functionally the same.

I've traveled with it a handful of times, it's relatively new, never been charged a fee (yet). Once practiced, it takes about 20 minutes to pack and unpack. Minimal tools.
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Old 12-05-17, 03:46 PM
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Originally Posted by nickw

The Ritcheys are a lot cheaper than most of the S&S bikes but are functionally the same.
This is definitely not true. Breakaway is extremely flexible and nothing to resist from the torque that you put on the bike.

S&S is Torque coupling.
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Old 12-05-17, 05:01 PM
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Originally Posted by linus
This is definitely not true. Breakaway is extremely flexible and nothing to resist from the torque that you put on the bike.

S&S is Torque coupling.
I've never used the Breakaway but my experience with S&S is it's functionally equivalent to a non-coupled frame. My experience is both paved and fairly-extensive back-country-off-road.
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Old 12-05-17, 05:08 PM
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Go to CGOAB, you will find a section of Folding Bikes , they have a lot of journals from Bike Friday Owners.. touring the globe.
Some from Brompton Owners

Hard to make a bike pack smaller than its wheels, so their 20 & 16" wheel bikes are a winner.. the bikes pack in a suitcase.

their tandem packs in two of them.

Is there any such kind of folding all road bike?
BF Pocket Llama is close.. I have a disc brake Rohloff one.




....

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Old 12-06-17, 10:14 AM
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Originally Posted by axolotl
Your post assumes someone will only be sending their bike somewhere on one occasion, and that it will be shipped solely within the USA. That all might be the case for the OP. However, for many other cyclists, that's not the case. I've checked my Bike Friday in its sub-62" suitcase at least 3 dozen times with airlines, many of these times on international flights. I figure I've easily saved over 200% of the cost of my Bike Friday in airline fees. The hassle factor for flying with my bike has gone way down. I've also been able to take it on some buses and trains which would not have allowed a regular bike at any price. Moreover, I've got a bike that I love to ride and which has been my preferred bike for many years.

No argument that it's possible to save enough to make buying a folder worthwhile, but as you note it takes a while. For OP, trying out touring and worrying about bail-out options, I don't see the expense of a BF or S&S makes sense. If OP likes it, and wants to do more, maybe then the special bike purchase will be justified.

Originally Posted by DanBell
Of course you can also use a cardboard box, generally a bit cheaper than 3-400...


Certainly the cardboard box is feasible. Will it provide the protection of an S&S hard case when it meets the baggage handler gorillas? Also, as axolotl implied, it's going to take a while to amortize the cost of a travel bike. Do you really want to spend the time (and perhaps money) to roust up a box every time you travel? IME, all the S&S coupled bike owners I've met also had a travel case.
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Old 12-06-17, 11:10 AM
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Originally Posted by linus
This is definitely not true. Breakaway is extremely flexible and nothing to resist from the torque that you put on the bike.

S&S is Torque coupling.
Did you see the first part of my post about weight? Ridden one?

Functional the same means that while have minor differences (S&S is heavier, more $$ and special tools are needed, Ritchey is likely less stiff and more prone to loose bolts) they ride about the same, pack in about the same time and fit in about the same size box. In 99% of situations just out riding your not going to notice nor care about the differences.

The Ritcheys have a stellar reputation (as do S&S) and work great and I've never heard of a single example of one breaking or a rider complaining about lack of stiffness.
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Old 12-06-17, 02:59 PM
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Originally Posted by nickw
Did you see the first part of my post about weight? Ridden one?

Functional the same means that while have minor differences (S&S is heavier, more $$ and special tools are needed, Ritchey is likely less stiff and more prone to loose bolts) they ride about the same, pack in about the same time and fit in about the same size box. In 99% of situations just out riding your not going to notice nor care about the differences.

The Ritcheys have a stellar reputation (as do S&S) and work great and I've never heard of a single example of one breaking or a rider complaining about lack of stiffness.
I had two. Even if you don't load them up, Breakaway is like asian noodle. Not to mention they creak after dirt riding because the joint area gets dirty.

I have people cut the bottom portion of breakaway and convert it to S&S because of it.
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Old 12-06-17, 04:08 PM
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Originally Posted by linus
I had two. Even if you don't load them up, Breakaway is like asian noodle. Not to mention they creak after dirt riding because the joint area gets dirty.

I have people cut the bottom portion of breakaway and convert it to S&S because of it.
Your experiences differ from a number of folks I've heard from who have ridden the Ritcheys and my own as well.

I did a multi-day tour, 25 lbs of load + me @ 175 over un-maintained gravel roads and poorly maintained pavement and never once did I think the bike was too flexible. I've also flown the bike down the CA to train on the road and hit the MTB trails, no load, it was stellar and never once thought it was flexy. I'm used to full carbon race bikes too. No creaks either, not one.

Fully loaded touring with 50+ lb may be different.....
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Old 12-06-17, 04:23 PM
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There is a folding bike section where you might get a more thorough list of what's available to suit your needs. I did a short tour on a modified Raleigh 20, not because I wanted a bail-out option, but because I didn't want to pay airline bicycle-handling fees. I'm sure more could have been done to make it comfortable and functional, and I know there are other bikes out there which fold and are also comfortable, but I didn't go that route. I decided that while I didn't want to pay the airlines all that extra money to move my bike, I also decided that touring was a time when I really wanted my most comfortable bike, and that I didn't want to sacrifice riding pleasure at the expense of portability. So I got an S & S coupled bike which I find very comfortable to ride, and which can be packed up a lot smaller than most bikes. I now have a folding bike that I use for shorter trips when I have reason to think the bike will be spending as much time being transported as it will spend transporting me. But for extended riding, I stick to my main bike.
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Old 12-06-17, 07:31 PM
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I recommend you go to Dahon's website to have a look, they have a lot of folding bike ( maybe some for touring). Happy riding!
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Old 12-06-17, 07:36 PM
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Originally Posted by NJcycles
I recommend you go to Dahon's website to have a look, they have a lot of folding bike ( maybe some for touring). Happy riding!
Yes, I own one Dahon Mu SL10 and had several long trip with my friends with it. Rides well!
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Old 01-17-18, 06:32 AM
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Originally Posted by MJBikes99
Yes, I own one Dahon Mu SL10 and had several long trip with my friends with it. Rides well!
This is my folding Dahon Dash that has carried me on tour. 19-113 gear-inches on tap, weighs about 12 kg stock. I'll be taking it to Taiwan in a few weeks...
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