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Old 12-06-17, 05:56 PM   #26
linus
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And thank you for answering exactly none of the OPs questions and showing a distasteful attitude that has become so common among your country-folk. Too bad, you guys used to be nice people.
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True, on all three sides of the borders, none anywhere close to where they are riding.

Brilliant.

That was your first post on this thread. What a great way to help the OP.


Joking a side, I'm just warning OP, that might shock the OP. I have a couple of friends that were traumatized by the "Southern" experience.
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Old 12-06-17, 06:00 PM   #27
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That was your first post on this thread. What a great way to help the OP.

Joking a side, I'm just warning OP, that might shock the OP. I have a couple of friends that were traumatized by the "Southern" experience.

Perhaps you should learn to read before commenting. Actually, you don't even need to read, just recognize similar shapes. You'll see some shapes associated with my account and post in the 5th post of this thread.

As I said, they are nowhere near the "South." I know people who have had bad experiences in Calgary (just a bunch of cowboys, right?), and rural Ontario. I know of people who have had bad experiences in Mexico. Like I said, it happens on all three borders. Only an ignorant fool thinks otherwise. Regardless, it is a small and unfortunate section of any of the three countries.

Now if you will choke down that crow, lets let this thread get back on track.

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Old 12-06-17, 06:20 PM   #28
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Let's stop with the back and forth bickering and keep the thread on topic .
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Old 12-06-17, 07:01 PM   #29
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Here's some pertinent help for your camping question. How To Camp Anywhere -- A Tongue-in-cheek Answer to a Bicycle Camping Problem


Over the years I have met Japanese, Argentinian, German, British, and French bike tourers.(I lived in a town on a popular coast to coast route)

Some had no English at all, some were on very small budgets, some were not. All were making it OK. And this was before the internet!
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Old 12-06-17, 08:35 PM   #30
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Well I just deleted my comments about some of the comments on here, particularly my comment on arrogant Canadians. So moving on...

I'm no font of information about touring. But the OP needs to know, that particular area of this country is particularly inhospitable. In fact, I cannot think of many places within the US borders that is as dangerous place to bike tour. Yes, people do it. Yes, successfully. But I'm not sure most people are quite prepared for the terrain, distances, remoteness and lack of civilization for long stretches. There are miles...as in hundreds...of no services available, no food, no water. There will be no quick extraction in case of an accident, no medical services nearby, no ambulance arriving in 15-20 minutes, no law enforcement if you are waylaid by ner-do-wells, no means of finding parts for a serious mechanical failure. Again, yes I realize many do it in spite of that. But IF one is not prepared with a skill set for survival that most people do not possess, then in an emergency, survival would or could be iffy at best.
If it were me, going into a foreign country, unless I had experience in inhospitable, extreme desert conditions, I would perhaps choose a route a bit less challenging.
Like others have suggested, perhaps the OP should at least think about going north and maybe touring through SF, maybe Lake Tahoe, Yosemite...there's lots to see up there.
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Old 12-06-17, 09:04 PM   #31
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You will be fine,

Stealth camping as we call it, dispersed camping. I have riden north to south, east to west. Never had a problem with wild camping. The green places on your map are public lands. For the most part it is legel to camp on public lands, Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service lands Have a 15 day limit for dispersed camping. Some Koa, and National Park campgrounds have hiker biker sites, they charge $ 5 or $10 for bicycles. I do not wild camp near a city, or within sight of a building. I do not camp wild where I can be seen. I do get off the road and out of sight. A drunk person will not stumble onto my camp. If I am not sure who owns the land, I am rolled up and ready to move at dawn. There needs to be enough light to make sure nothing gets left behind.

The people that did have a problem stealth camping, built a fire to draw attention to themselves, or left trash everywhere, or beer was the reason for their problem. Stealth means they can not see you or hear you.

Sun Screen. Why not? There is very little sun screen for sale in South America. Might have to take some with you. Anything wrong with a long sleve shirt.

How do you plan to charge your phone alarm every day? You may not be able to plug it in every day. I carry a curled 6 foot cable on every tour. If I plan to be in populated areas, I also carry a 870 gram Abus lock.


Apologies for the rude posting. Some retired old people sit and drink alone with their computer.

They are planing to ride through South America. They will find far more harsh environments than the desert southwest along their way.

Her are a couple of ideas for routes
https://www.adventurecycling.org/rou...e-network-map/
https://www.mapmyride.com/routes/
https://www.visitutah.com/things-to-...s/road-cycling
http://azbikeped.org/maps.asp
http://www.bikepacking.com/routes/plateau-passage/

Will they read this far down after the non pleasent posts above?

Last edited by chrisx; 12-06-17 at 09:50 PM.
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Old 12-06-17, 09:54 PM   #32
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Like others have suggested, perhaps the OP should at least think about going north and maybe touring through SF, maybe Lake Tahoe, Yosemite...there's lots to see up there.
Their dates are from early March to late May. Going further north isn't a realistic option. During most of that time period, cold temperatures are a bigger issue than desert heat.
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Old 12-07-17, 12:37 AM   #33
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out where y'all will be, the gub'mint owns huge swathes of land.
billions and billions of acres. lotsa free camping. do a little research
on BLM land.....and make sure whatever maps you use indicate
public lands.

some of the land is leased for grazing. public still has access.
if you're riding the dirt roads in cattle country, learn gate
etiquette.

it's big country out there. and some areas have a whole lot of
nothing. you can go long distances without seeing any civilization.
carry more water than you think you need, and have a backup
plan. that "town" on the map may have only had 15 people
30 years ago during the oil boom.

in smaller towns you can check with the local police to maybe get
permission to camp overnight in the town park. if not, they know
who to call to find a spot.

don't depend on cell phones. unless things have changed drastically,
there are huge areas of no coverage. cell reception limited to a
narrow band along the interstate highways.

eat good food:
chicken fried steak
pecan pie
anything mexican (except for menudo! and i don't mean the band)
briscuit
more chicken fried steak

learn about the hazards and first aid for:
heat stroke
cactus attack
snake bite
alien probing
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Old 12-07-17, 08:13 AM   #34
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My only comment is about your flags, you might consider adding a US flag to your display, as someone else pointed out most Americans won't know one flag from another, but everyone knows the "stars & stripes".
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Old 12-07-17, 02:45 PM   #35
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Perhaps you should learn to read before commenting. Actually, you don't even need to read, just recognize similar shapes. You'll see some shapes associated with my account and post in the 5th post of this thread.

As I said, they are nowhere near the "South." I know people who have had bad experiences in Calgary (just a bunch of cowboys, right?), and rural Ontario. I know of people who have had bad experiences in Mexico. Like I said, it happens on all three borders. Only an ignorant fool thinks otherwise. Regardless, it is a small and unfortunate section of any of the three countries.

Now if you will choke down that crow, lets let this thread get back on track.
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Well I just deleted my comments about some of the comments on here, particularly my comment on arrogant Canadians. So moving on...
.
Here is my last post on the thread.

I don't know why people are offended and trying to defer the topic to something about "arrogant Canadians" and bad experience in Canada. I've never said anything about Canada being better country.

The topic here is traveling in the U.S. and OP eventually travel through rural area so just wanted to give them a tip. Just like "watch out for a bear" in the park so to speak.

Anyway, if I offended you, my apologies. I didn't mean to put down anybody.

Have a great day.
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Old 12-08-17, 12:23 AM   #36
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If one wants to stop at museums or restaurants a lock would help deter opportunistic thieves who can lurk even in small towns. In big cities I wouldn't want to leave any nice bike or camping stuff outside.

In SW USA I'd recommend long sleeves & pants for the summer, sun can burn even folks who aren't esp light-skinned.
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Old 12-08-17, 10:05 AM   #37
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Quote:
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it's big country out there. and some areas have a whole lot of
nothing. you can go long distances without seeing any civilization.
carry more water than you think you need, and have a backup
plan. that "town" on the map may have only had 15 people
30 years ago during the oil boom.
Interesting.

Although our plan for next Spring is nothing like LAX-SLC, I was wondering if there are tools to learn about drinking water availability, in the US SW. (we plan to ride Bryce -> Page and assume that there will be no water supply point for something like 60+ miles).
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Old 12-08-17, 10:20 AM   #38
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SIM cards: several large SIM networks including AT&T and T-Mobile. You can find coverage maps online, but I've found AT&T in more rural places.

Many different resellers on SIM cards that will use these networks but charge less and also support unlocked phones including several already mentioned above.

One I use is "net10" and the SIM cards are sold in Walmart stores. The package has SIM cards in different sizes and typically has *both* an AT&T and T-Mobile card where you pick *one*. Activate online or via phone. These have a month by month prepaid service. The AT&T flavor has 2GB limit over this time and T-Mobile no limit.

A net10 card bought from Walmart is what I plan after arrival back in the USA after a year and half on the road.

As far as flags go, I don't foresee problems.
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Old 12-08-17, 10:51 AM   #39
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there are competing companies each with their own cell tower, and then there are large areas with no coverage at all ..

so you can be in a place with natural beauty but no coverage,

or coverage but not with the company you paid your money to, so you still cant use it.




....
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Old 12-08-17, 11:33 AM   #40
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Wikipedia provides summary of US Cell industry:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_phone_industry_in_the_United_States

Four nationwide networks: Verizon, Sprint, AT&T and T-Mobile. Sprint & Verizon use CDMA so most likely don't work for your phone. So really two nationwide networks and some regional ones.

Half a dozen mobile virtual network operators. These don't have their own network but instead use one or more of the large networks and resell service. Four of these are GSM. Some of these have multiple brands, e.g. TracFone, SimpleMobile, Net10.

Many Americans buy phones together with service - so not every US purchased phone is "unlocked" to work with any SIM card.

Look for places that sell "SIM cards for unlocked phones" and these will also work fine with phones from outside the USA (I bought my phone in US, but the same phone is sold in Mexico and I have used it through Latin America). Either packaging or pages like Wikipedia should tell you what US nationwide network is used.
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Old 12-08-17, 11:34 AM   #41
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French farm.

Western USA ranch.

Gotta agree with andr0id: plan to carry lotsa water. Hope you have a lovely trip!
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Old 12-08-17, 11:51 AM   #42
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don't worry, we'll fill up at the next town.
lesee.....texas.....highway 90......here it is....
google sez dryden texas 78851 has a population of 13!
heck, if it's got a zip code it's gotta have water, right?


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Old 12-08-17, 12:44 PM   #43
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google sez dryden texas 78851 has a population of 13!
"Dry den." I get it.

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Old 12-08-17, 02:44 PM   #44
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Sun and heat

People who haven't spent time in the desert southwest tend to underestimate the power of the sun and the heat in the desert. That means lots of water, at times I've drunk as many as 12 liters in a day (late June in the Mojave). An electrolyte powder such as Propel is a good thing to have if you are drinking upwards of 4 liters/day. If you are camping in a remote place remember you will be consuming a significant amount of water overnight. I wear long-sleaved shirts, a wide-brimmed hat, and a bandanda around the neck in addition to generously slathering on the sun block. If you are riding on pavement flagging down cars to ask for water is always a possibility (too stubborn to do that myself), better to plan very carefully where you will be refilling on water just in case.
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Old 12-08-17, 07:25 PM   #45
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An electrolyte powder such as Propel is a good thing to have if you are drinking upwards of 4 liters/day.
This is great advice! I also love banana chips for the high calorie to weight and the electrolytes. Don't underestimate what cramping muscles in the middle of nowhere can do.
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Old 12-08-17, 11:43 PM   #46
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oh it is real, alright.
I've made it half way down the driveway of a ranch outside Las Cruces, NM before I saw the dogs. I didn't wait to see if they were friendly. They were in a full sprint. It was fun to spray pepper spray in one of the dogs face as they were chasing me down the state highway. That stuff works.

I've been bitten by dogs on several occasions as I was passing farm houses without stopping.

One of my personal fantasies is to kill a dog in front of it's owner.
You are not wrong. My experience with dogs mirrors yours, and not only on a bike. Not all dogs will attack but you had best be prepared to defend against the few who do, as well as the angry owners of the dogs. A canister of bear spray is effective against both, with multiple one-second bursts per canister. I keep mine handy on all rides.
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Old 12-09-17, 02:52 PM   #47
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As far as sun is concerned, think North Africa or Southern Spain, you will be at the same latitude. The North rim of the Grand Canyon is well over 2,000 meters in altitude. Cover up! If I were to do it again, I'd get nose protector like some alpinists use.
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Old 12-09-17, 11:32 PM   #48
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France: 643,801 km2

Texas: 696,200 km2

Texas much bigger than France.
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Old 12-16-17, 10:05 AM   #49
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I've toured in the US, and in the summer of 2016 did about 500Km over eight days between Bretagne and Normandie as part of a longer tour. One wild camp, seven nights camp grounds. I was refused water in one small village by an old farmer, but that man's son was very apologetic and gave me some.

I found France to be like the US in most of the ways you asked about.

It was a hot and sunny period in July of 2016 when I was in France and I saw men working outside without shirts on, they were all sunburned. If they tried that in our Southwest they would have been incinerated.

In the Southwest, just to be safe I think you should anticipate up to about 140Km between available water and plan accordingly.

After decades of use I now avoid any sort of sun lotion or sun block, I find a broad-brimmed hat and long sleeved-shirts and pants to be far more effective. This is how I rode from Texas to New York in July of 2014, full sun most of the way and I never even began to get burned.

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Old 12-16-17, 10:30 AM   #50
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Joking a side, I'm just warning OP, that might shock the OP. I have a couple of friends that were traumatized by the "Southern" experience.
I spent my childhood in an England that was still lily-White. Folks hated each other anyway, as a teenager in the urban working class in a big city I could get the crap kicked out of me with steel-toed Docs for merely being on the wrong street.

In my twenties I lived for three years in a remote West African village, no electricity no running water. Folks hated each other anyway, fists and machetes were the weapons of choice.

For the last 30 years I have lived and worked in a higher crime area of a big city, most everybody I live and work around is Hispanic, I was married to and often traveled with a dark-skinned Hispanic woman for twenty-five years of that time, we traveled all over the United States, often across "The South" ("gasp"). My son is Hispanic so is my granddaughter. Several drive-by's in the neighborhood, one on the house next door and several people getting shot over that time in my area including one of my students, two kids over the years at my school in wheelchairs forever because of random drive-by bullets, several rapes and assaults in the area, one fleeing felon shot dead on campus. All of this violence Hispanic on Hispanic.


Wherever you go, a few people ain't gonna like you for whatever reason. But unless you get kicked to a pulp with steel-toed Docs, hacked with machetes, raped, robbed or shot at from a moving vehicle IMHO these things should be ranked as minor aggravations. Absent those awful sorts of outcomes folks can still feel "traumatized" all they want, after all "feelings" are free.

OTOH once folks actually meet you, their opinion of you can change pretty quick, depending on how you act. Maybe not a 180 change of opinion, but better nonetheless.

A long way of saying I do get sick of all this constant harping on "race".

Rant off. Hope I didn't tank the thread.

Mike

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