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What's a compromise between a road and touring bike?

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What's a compromise between a road and touring bike?

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Old 06-10-05, 03:56 PM
  #1  
Sigurdd50
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What's a compromise between a road and touring bike?

I'm sure this has been covered, but my searches were so so

I have a nice fast road bike (Felt F65), first new bike purchase in many years (this last Feb). Got a great deal, and it is a fun bike that is comfortable. I know it is not really a touring bike, but I am taking it on a 'credit card' type tour (Bikenorthwoods) next week. After about 800 of long rides this spring, I think it will be fine. Affixed a front bag and a good sized seat bag. There are no braze ons for a back rack (boo) so no rack. My GF has a Trek with a rack so she will do the bungie cords and windbreakers,etc.

I doubt I will ever do any loaded touring again... but you never know. But I'd like to have some rack(s) and perhaps the different geometry.

Can any one suggest bikes that are a bit of a cross between fast road and touring set ups? Not neccessarily a high priced, custom deal... Just what is out there. I'm not in the market now... but may look around a bit, plus, on the tour I'm doing, I want to keep my eye out on what folks are riding and compare notes.

thanks
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Old 06-10-05, 04:21 PM
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Some of the new crop of comfort-roadbikes are considered light tourers. Check out something like the Specialized Sequoia. It has rack mounts. Trek has their C-series bikes (1000C, 1200C, 2100C, 2300C) which are similar but offer different gimickery. That's the problem with these lines of bikes though. They offer gimicks which you might not want... like a soft-tail rear suspension.

There are also straight-up affordable (relatively) touring bikes. Check out the Fuji Touring or the Fuji World for instance. And Trek of course has the 520.
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Old 06-11-05, 04:01 AM
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Possibly
http://www.jamisbikes.com/bikes/05_satellite.html
but are the brakes long drop or std drop calipers? For this style you really need the extra clearance of long drops.
You could always build up a Soma ES or Gunnar or Surly frame.
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Old 06-11-05, 06:50 AM
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What about a cross bike? they're a little less 'twitchy' than a crit frame and they are beefier to take the cross as well; many of them have rear rack mounts and they'll obviously accept any brake/wheel combination you choose to select.
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Old 06-12-05, 09:30 PM
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I'll take a different tack, keep your bike and get a Carradice bag. http://www.wallbike.com/carradice/ca...addlebags.html
I have the Pendle with the Bagman rack. Although I don't use it for touring (I use it for commuting) it could very easily handle a credit card tour.
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Old 06-13-05, 12:22 AM
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Sounds like you want a Sport Touring bicycle.

Something along these lines, perhaps:
http://www.marinoni.qc.ca/html/2005/05_en_ciclo.asp
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Old 06-13-05, 02:00 AM
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Machka, would you happen to know about how much that bike retails for?

-Matt
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Old 06-13-05, 02:15 PM
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Originally Posted by ehammarlund
What about a cross bike? they're a little less 'twitchy' than a crit frame and they are beefier to take the cross as well; many of them have rear rack mounts and they'll obviously accept any brake/wheel combination you choose to select.
I second that motion. I've been an advocate for cyclocross bikes for awhile now. I've had a Trek XO-1 for a about 4 years now, and love the thing (though the newer models are more race-oriented). If you're only going to have one bike, cyclocross is really the one to have - a great balance between road, touring, and mountain bikes. More durable and comfortable than road, more nimble and quick than touring, much faster than a mountain (though they can't go off-road to the same extent).

Most cross frames have rear-rack eyelets, which makes them ideal for light touring and commuting - if you want a bike for commuting/light touring, I think it's the best way to go. For long-term loaded touring, you do need a true touring rig.
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Old 06-13-05, 05:02 PM
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Hey Machka I just ordered that very frame. It will serve duty as a "light tourer" or a bike for unloaded long distance rides.
I got it with custom geometry and paint options for $825CAD (frame and fork). Can't wait to get it built up.
Personally I think Marinoni is one of the bike industries best kept secrets despite my efforts (and yours) to out them.
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Old 06-15-05, 07:16 AM
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Trouble with the sports tourers is they're not designed to take heavy loads. A good solid tourer would never use Bontrager sport wheels....the more spokes the stronger and more relaible with loads.
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Old 06-15-05, 09:31 AM
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I used to have three Cannondales...one for cross, one for touring and a pure roadie...I have sold all three of them in the past 18 months. I now only have one bike, a Surly Crosscheck. I love it more than all Cannondales combined. Extremely versatile!
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Old 06-15-05, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by maximum01
Trouble with the sports tourers is they're not designed to take heavy loads. A good solid tourer would never use Bontrager sport wheels....the more spokes the stronger and more relaible with loads.
You are right about that, but he's not looking for a "good solid tourer" and it depends on how heavy the rider is and how often he is doing tours. If he is lighter and only carrying about 20 pounds or less for "light" touring then the Bontrager wheels will be fine.

I have a 1999 LeMond Zurich that I have used several times (4 times) for "light" touring (rear rack and panniers) and I was using Rolf Vector low spoke wheels, 18 in front and 20 in back. I think I was risking it a bit because I weigh 210-215 and was carrying about 20 pounds of gear. I was amazed how long the wheels lasted considering my weight and I never broke a single spoke. I replaced them after 11,000 miles because I saw some small cracks forming near the spoke nipples. I Rolf's were kind of the predecessor to the Bontrager's.

I can understand the desire to have a faster bike to do "light" touring and I would recommend any of the road bikes that have rear brazeons for a rack as long as you're not as heavy as me (I may have been pushing my luck a bit). I now have a Giant OCR Touring bike with heavy duty wheels, etc. to carry this big load around along with 30-40 pounds of camping gear.
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Old 06-15-05, 10:17 AM
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I'll second the Surly Cross Check recommendation. It is the most versatile bike I own. Works for loaded touring, commuting, century rides, light offroad, etc.

Fixed, singlespeed, 8 speed, 24 speed, 27 speed, drops, flat bars, cruiser bars, fat tires, skinny tires, offroad tires, etc. Available as a frameset or a built up bike.

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Old 06-15-05, 09:11 PM
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Originally Posted by maximum01
Trouble with the sports tourers is they're not designed to take heavy loads. A good solid tourer would never use Bontrager sport wheels....the more spokes the stronger and more relaible with loads.
The problem with *me* is that *I'm* not designed to take heavy loads. Thank you for confirming that I made the right choice in ordering this frame. I'll never understand the pride some touring cyclists take in their ability to haul their own body weight in gear. I would think, though, the original poster would be interested in something *not* designed for heavy loads hence the question about a happy medium btwn road bike and tourer.
Gotta agree with the wheels though. Those high zoot racing wheels are just silly for that bike. I have a feeling they just used them to dress her up for the photo shoot since I haven't actually seen the bike for sale with that setup. Personally I went with a nice light custom built wheel (36 hole in the rear 32 in the front).

Last edited by Frith; 06-15-05 at 09:24 PM.
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Old 06-15-05, 09:22 PM
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Versatile it may be, however I don't think that's what the O.P. was looking for.
Rather than ultimate versatility they asked specifically for a happy medium between pure road and pure tourer. The cross check excels in neither of those respects. I own one. I run it single speed and use it primarily as a commuter and sometimes as a cross bike (it's great at that btw ;-). It's high bottom bracket (a trait most cross bikes share) is also a problem under a load. If the poster had mentioned that they may
a)also want to take it off road
b)needed it to serve duty as a 4 season commuter
c)wanted durablitity at low cost.
then I would fully endorse the cross check.
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Old 06-15-05, 09:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Frith
Versatile it may be, however I don't think that's what the O.P. was looking for.
Rather than ultimate versatility they asked specifically for a happy medium between pure road and pure tourer. The cross check excels in neither of those respects. I own one. I run it single speed and use it primarily as a commuter and sometimes as a cross bike (it's great at that btw ;-). It's high bottom bracket (a trait most cross bikes share) is also a problem under a load. If the poster had mentioned that they may
a)also want to take it off road
b)needed it to serve duty as a 4 season commuter
c)wanted durablitity at low cost.
then I would fully endorse the cross check.
Given your responses, I'd be curious to hear what the specs are for your custom bike and the reasoning behind your choices in regards to a light (or unloaded) tourer. It seems your insight/research into the geometry would be very applicable to the OP's situation.

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Old 06-16-05, 02:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Belugadave

I can understand the desire to have a faster bike to do "light" touring and I would recommend any of the road bikes that have rear brazeons for a rack as long as you're not as heavy as me (I may have been pushing my luck a bit). I now have a Giant OCR Touring bike with heavy duty wheels, etc. to carry this big load around along with 30-40 pounds of camping gear.
I'm curious, is the Giant OCR the only touring bike out there with disc brakes? I have discs (Hayes hydraulics) on my mountain bike (Kona Cinder Cone) and like them a lot. With their stopping power and no wear on the rims, one would think that they would be suited for long distance touring -- although repairs could be more difficult in remote areas.
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Old 06-16-05, 05:31 PM
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Originally Posted by bbaker22
Given your responses, I'd be curious to hear what the specs are for your custom bike and the reasoning behind your choices in regards to a light (or unloaded) tourer. It seems your insight/research into the geometry would be very applicable to the OP's situation.

baker
Sure, The ciclo has fairly standard road bike geometry (They do sell set geometry/paint versions of the ciclo for around $700 canadian for the frame and fork i think). I worked with Michael Barry ( www.bikespeciaties.com ) a frame builder himself to get the geometry sorted out. Marinoni isn't truly custom in the way a Serotta or Waterford might be. They allow you to adjust geometry to get a good fit but you don't have much input as far as angles and such. The seat tube angle and head tube angle are both 72.8 which doesn't differ too much from my current racing bike. I opted for 45cm chainstays to make sure I'd have pannier clearance for my size 12 feet. I also opted for a slightly extended headtube to get the bars at a decent height without too many spacers.
The components are 105 except for the crank which is a Nashbar 'treking' triple with 48-38-28. I felt that was a good comprimise between a big roadbike triple and a small mountain bike triple. The wheels are velocity aerohead rims laced to 105 hubs, 36 hole in the rear and 32 in the front. I felt that this setup would easily handle the weight I intend to carry and is still pretty light and fast for unloaded. The ciclo uses standard road caliper brakes and will accept tires as large as 28mm. Again 28's would be large enough for the kind of weight I want to carry.
Ironically, I bought all these parts to put on the surly frame which was going to play the role of commuter/tourer/everything else. Not being one to need much of an excuse to spend money I shouldn't be spending on bikes, I decided the Marinoni frame was better suited for the parts and that the surly would make a great single speed commuter/cyclocross bike.

As a side note, one bike I do remember looking at and considering as a good out of the box roadbike/tourer is the Bianchi Eros... I just remembered that. The OP may want to see if that bike fits into his/her price range.
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Old 06-16-05, 05:47 PM
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Didn't have a chance to read this whole thread right now, so excuse the repeated info if this has been said already.

You can get rear racks that have various fixtures, allowing you to more or less "clamp" them to your frame. I just got an Epic rack that came with such hardware. I didn't have to use it, but it looked as though it would work fairly well.
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Old 06-16-05, 10:36 PM
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Originally Posted by foggydew
I'm curious, is the Giant OCR the only touring bike out there with disc brakes? I have discs (Hayes hydraulics) on my mountain bike (Kona Cinder Cone) and like them a lot. With their stopping power and no wear on the rims, one would think that they would be suited for long distance touring -- although repairs could be more difficult in remote areas.
It's the only one that I know of with disc brakes, but I'm not real up to speed on it. And they are mechanical disc brakes, not hydraulic, so repairs and adjustments are not as difficult. There have been quite a few threads discussing disc brakes on touring bikes so type "disc brake" into the search tool and you can find them.
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