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Bike Packing Camp Stoves

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Bike Packing Camp Stoves

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Old 03-15-19, 11:14 PM
  #126  
Lovegasoline
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Originally Posted by greatscott View Post
At the time I bought the one I showed, all the cheaper ones I got terrible reviews which is why I didn't buy one that was cheaper. The Titanium one that I just saw on Amazon doesn't have a pezel starter and it costs $3 more then mine which isn't a big deal more.

I haven't had any issues with my stove, BTU output is the same as a friends MSR system, we both boiled water with a few seconds of each other in the same size container, the output is supposedly 6.666 BTUs; I don't have nothing to weigh my stove with but it's light and very small; works in cold weather (but I haven't been touring and cooking at below 45 degrees yet but it worked fine for that and I don't plan on touring in freezing temps), while raining, in the wind if I use the windscreen and high altitudes (I haven't camped at above 8,000 feet while touring, I'm not sure how high I was, somewhere between 6000 to 7500 feet); there is no reason to strip the stove because it's very basic and nothing to go wrong except for the pezel lighter could fail so you then you light it with a match or a lighter, or a magnesium spark if that were to happen. I happened to find this review today on my stove: https://www.outdoorgearlab.com/revie...ity-ultralight It has some negatives but those negatives won't effect me due to I don't camp in those conditions.
Hi greatscott,
Please don't misunderstand me I'm not dissing your stove ...if your gear choices work for you than all's good : )

My post was simply a follow up to the idea that "you can tour on a budget if you want".
Within that paradigm any opportunity to reduce an expense by 50% can be beneficial. If all expenses can be reduced by 50% (or more), even better.

Originally Posted by greatscott View Post
When it's windy I pull this out: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1 cheap only $10 and it works great.
Just a head's up, many canister stove manufacturers warn against using a windscreen as it can result in an explosion. Take care when using it. YMMV.
An aside: once I was walking back to my campsite when I heard a massively loud explosion. An isobutane-propane cartridge exploded ... shrapnel blew holes in the surrounding camp chairs. Very interesting drama!

Another way to start a fire with a battery, in this case a AA:
Go to about 1:35 in the video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SL6X_WiLiEA

PS: I didn't buy my $7 stove from Amazon but from another internet vendor - Monoprice - better known for inexpensive computer cables and accessories. I never even imagined they sold camping gear. Apparently they're not currently selling the stove I bought. It's also pretty light @1.8oz if that sort of thing matters. Nowadays inexpensive stoves abound.


Sawyer Mini Water Filter:
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Nope. Not a bad one. Itís a problem that hollow fiber filters have. Google ďSawyer filter failureĒ and youíll find all kind of stories about failures. They are all along the lines of mine...worked fine, perhaps stored, and then didnít work or only had a trickle. And Iíve found lots of ideas on how to bring the filter back but if the filter suddenly stops working in nowhere and you donít have access to the stuff you need for those fixes, they are useless as is the filter.
I've never used one before however I bought one new on ebay a couple months ago ($10) to fit into an ultralight backpacking kit (and maybe bring along bike touring). There seems to be a lot of advice on backflushing, avoiding storage in freezing temps (i.e. bring into sleeping bag if it's cold), and perhaps a makeshift silt prefilter. Like a lot of stuff there's people that swear at them and those that swear by them.
--

Quite the trip down memory lane with all those Bleuet stoves and blue canisters.

Last edited by Lovegasoline; 03-16-19 at 01:44 PM.
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Old 03-16-19, 08:39 AM
  #127  
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Originally Posted by Lovegasoline View Post
Sawyer Mini Water Filter:


I've never used one before however I bought one new on ebay a couple months ago ($10) to fit into an ultralight backpacking kit (and maybe bring along bike touring). There seems to be a lot of advice on backflushing, avoiding storage in freezing temps (i.e. bring into sleeping bag if it's cold), and perhaps a makeshift silt prefilter. Like a lot of stuff there's people that swear at them and those that swear by them.
Iíve heard it all before. Just to be clear, I filtered about a liter of water through the filter. The water source was from a stream at 11,800 feet surrounded by 13,000 to 14,000 foot granitic peaks. In a drop of only about 2000 feet while flowing over granite, there isnít much dissolved in the water nor is there even much sediment. The stream I filtered from was clear and there wasnít even a sand bar where it flowed into the lake. I then took the filter home and let it dry so that it wouldnít mildew. It was never frozen and never used again until about a year later when I took the dried filter with me on a bikepacking trip.

The water I filtered was clear and free of sediment. I filled the squeeze bag and tried to filter the water. A trickle came out. I squeezed for about an hour and got about a cup of water out of the filter. I was able to get about a liter more by placing a rock on the bag and letting it drip into a tea pot. As I wasnít expecting the filter to not work nor even expecting to have a problem, I wasnít carrying vinegar (suggestions for getting it to flow again) nor the backflushing system (I didnít have water to back flush with anyway). As I was expecting to have a filter that worked, I didnít have other purification methods other then boiling. But boiling and cooling of enough water for use is kind difficult if you only have a tea pot that will functionally only hold about 800 ml of water and you need about 3 liters of water. I made due but thatís more fuel than I wanted to use.

Compare that with the Sweetwater filter Iíve used before. Iíve filtered gallons of water with it and never had an issue with any aspect of using it. It has never plugged. It has never reduced flow. It has never failed in any way. Yes, itís a bit heavier but itís a whole lot lighter than something that doesnít work.

Finally, just to be clear, Iíve had experience with hollow fiber filters at work. We use them on deionization systems at my work. Since my incident with the Sawyer, Iíve had some experience with dried out filters that do exactly what the Sawyer did. Once dry...especially here in dry Colorado...the hollow fiber wonít rehydrate and flow is reduced or nonexistent.
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Old 03-16-19, 09:44 AM
  #128  
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Quite the trip down memory lane with all those Bleuet stoves and blue canisters.
A trip down memory lane in the USA. In most of the rest of the world, the Bleuet pattern remains a current camp stove system.

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Old 03-16-19, 10:01 AM
  #129  
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restrictions in size of bike packing bags does make a tiny stove really important.. Sure you cannot get along without cooking ?
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Old 03-16-19, 05:04 PM
  #130  
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It had been a couple of years since I'd taken the pulse of camp stoves and this thread got me surfing the 'net.

I cycle tour rather than bike pack (or through hike, an activity that seems to drive a lot of the lightweight camping market) and I daily visit at least one small village with some sort of store where I can buy the foodstuffs of the locals. I see Jetboil et al is trying to do more these days than just super efficiently boil water to rehydrate packaged meals. Hmm: Jetcook?

For the last seven years or so I've thought the Biolite wood burner was simultaneously cool and ridiculous. If it works for you I'm happy, but most of the campgrounds I bivouac in seem to be either gleaned or have prohibitions on foraging combustibles. 2019 and not to worry: Biolite now offers pre-packaged bags of clean, dry 'twigs'.


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Old 03-16-19, 06:42 PM
  #131  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post


Nope. Not a bad one. It’s a problem that hollow fiber filters have. Google “Sawyer filter failure” and you’ll find all kind of stories about failures. They are all along the lines of mine...worked fine, perhaps stored, and then didn’t work or only had a trickle. And I’ve found lots of ideas on how to bring the filter back but if the filter suddenly stops working in nowhere and you don’t have access to the stuff you need for those fixes, they are useless as is the filter.

I have several of those (or something similar). They suffer from the same problem as stoves. At altitude, they don’t work. And, if they don’t work, they are less than useless. They are even dangerous since you might depend on them.

So far I've had no issues with the Sawyer, but remember too that the Sawyer Mini filter (the one I have) FAR outsells any other filtering system probably due to price, so there will be more reports of problems. If I run into a problem and I think it's something worth considering a different brand then I will, but these things have been throughly tested without issues, and all the reviews highly praise the Sawyer Mini. The only other filter on the market that I would remotely consider and it gets rave reviews, and is small enough to hike or bike tour with, is the LifeStraw water filter but it doesn't filter down as far as the Sawyer does and the cost per liter of water is a lot higher than the Sawyer.

I know too that the Sawyer system will not filter out viruses or heavy metals, but both of those things are rare in N American backcountry. If you're going to undeveloped countries then a bit more expensive filtration system that gets rid of viruses and heavy metals will be necessary. I'm not too sure since I don't use these types, but the best two I read about is the Grayl Ultralight system, and it's reasonably priced at just $60 but it will only do 150 liters; or the Aquamira Frontier Bottle filtration system that cost $50 and has a 450 liter capacity, but that one doesn't filter out the bacteria as well as the Grayl. But I don't need these better ones for where I go.

Years ago I use to have something similar to the MSR Sweetwater device you use, can't recall the brand any more, but it's a large device similar to the MSR and I didn't find it very ideal to go touring with due to size and weight, but no doubt it worked good which I'm sure the MSR does as well. But I googled MSR problems and found problems with them too; in addition to that they are mechanical, and a mechanical system will fail a lot faster than a non mechanical system like the Sawyer. So do you want mechanical failure, do you want larger space and weight in your backpack or panniers? Not for me anyways.

So in reality if my Sawyer ever fails I would simply buy another considering the options that are out there at this time.

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Old 03-17-19, 07:37 PM
  #132  
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Originally Posted by chrisx View Post
How fine of a grind is it? If I grind beans at the super market, I use the finest setting.

Is there a coffee thread for the touring cyclist, or does it just fit in with camp stoves?
It has an adjustable grind. I always use the the most coarse setting, so I'm not sure exactly how fine it gets.
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