Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Waterproof Breathable Jacket/Pants

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Waterproof Breathable Jacket/Pants

Old 02-26-18, 06:50 PM
  #1  
LuckySailor
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
LuckySailor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Posts: 649

Bikes: Trek 520 total custom build, Cannondale Mountain Tandem, Oryx Mountain Bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 54 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Waterproof Breathable Jacket/Pants

I am posting this in touring for a reason. What I have found on my past tours is that I'm getting soaked when I'm in rain for more than a couple hours. My most recent purchase was from J and G Cyclewear. In my opinion, it is commuter grade. That's it though. Looks good, fit well, didn't perform anywhere near expectations.
I have ordered Columbia OutDry EX Gold Titanium for my upcoming Arctic trip. There will be long days of rain, and mud, I am certain. The fabric does not have a DWR type coating on the outside to wear off. So this is where it's different than other waterproof breathable on the market.
What are your thoughts? Anything that you have used that worked for you? Or is this just never gonna happen?
LuckySailor is offline  
Old 02-26-18, 07:15 PM
  #2  
fantom1 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Middle of the desert
Posts: 543
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 136 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
ShowersPass eVent. Expensive, but worth it.

/end
fantom1 is offline  
Old 02-26-18, 08:04 PM
  #3  
JohnJ80
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 4,036

Bikes: N+1=5

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 568 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 12 Posts
Agree with Showers Pass stuff. Better yet is Foxwear - Foxwear | Custom Sized Sports Clothing by Lou Binik | Salmon, ID | (877) 756-3699. Custom stuff made by Lou Binik that’s less expensive than off the shelf garments. Neoshell seems similar to the eVent in my Shower’s Pass jacket and is one of Lou’s favorite fabrics. I have a pair of rain pants from him that remain dry even when I’m working pretty hard.

If you order from him, the stuff shows up in something like a week after you order it - and it’s custom made. Pretty amazing service.

J.
JohnJ80 is offline  
Old 02-26-18, 09:02 PM
  #4  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 5,196

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Salsa Timberjack Ti, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Pink Klein MTB, Phil Wood VeloXS Frame (w/DA 7400), Cilo Road Frame, Proteus frame

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1186 Post(s)
Liked 48 Times in 33 Posts
I would love to try the new Gore Shakedry stuff and that Lou Binik guy seems interesting.

What I am currently using is Mountain Hardwear Chinley 3L jacket and Seraction Pant but I don't know if they are still making these? I am sure they are making suitable replacements but so far they have been great, decent breathability and certainly have lasted a while (3+ years at least) I have two pairs of Outdry gloves and they are great but I don't know about the fabric's breathability for say a jacket?
veganbikes is offline  
Old 02-27-18, 10:08 AM
  #5  
L134
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: San Diego
Posts: 300

Bikes: 1978 Bruce Gordon, 1978 Lippy, 199? Lippy tandem, Bike Friday NWT, Trek 720(stolen-frame recovered), Rivendell Atlantis

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 136 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Iím wondering if the real problem is being cold not being wet? I find if I ride for any length of time at all, even in nice weather, I will get wet and I do not perspire heavily. To me, the keys are frame of mind (accept, I WILL get wet) and staying warm. I have a Showers Pass jacket and it is OK but I wouldnít say it keeps me dry and I wouldnít buy another thinking it would keep me dry. I donít really like it much. I also have a cheapo, Nashbar windbreaker that is very light and water resistant. For warmer, wet weather I will wear the cheapo windbreaker. I get wet but Iím warm. For cold, wet weather, Iíll wear the Showers Pass but not because it will keep me dry (it doesnít) but because it is heavier and will keep me warmer while also allowing me to regulate temperature somewhat with the various vents. Next time in the market I would be looking for a cross between the two - light weight with venting options - and layer for temperature appropriately. Not being in the market presently, I donít know if such an animal exists.
L134 is offline  
Old 02-27-18, 10:46 AM
  #6  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 41,396

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 188 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6925 Post(s)
Liked 248 Times in 205 Posts
97 tour , LL Bean anorak (loved the kangaroo pocket, & hand warmer pouch behind it for glove stow.)

and at REI I got a 2 later loose liner rain pants with elastic suspenders ..


Now living in a place as wet as the Irish coast , I'm a convinced fan of Cyclist's rain capes..

ventilation instead of expensive, fragile, WPB fabrics.. ideal for my moderate speed..



...

Last edited by fietsbob; 02-27-18 at 11:42 AM.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 02-27-18, 10:51 AM
  #7  
pdlamb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 5,380

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1021 Post(s)
Liked 83 Times in 57 Posts
I've come to accept that if it's more than 40-45F, I'm going to get wet when it rains. Over that, I sweat faster than any jacket I've seen can handle the moisture. Below that, pit vents are one key, and a back vent helps a bit if it's not raining too hard, so that I can open the front zipper. A simple wind jacket works just about as well when the outside temperature is higher to keep me warm, since it keeps my warm sweat from evaporating.


I think Goretex and similar one-way moisture barriers fabrics are oversold and overbought, while they under-deliver.
pdlamb is offline  
Old 02-27-18, 11:43 AM
  #8  
TimothyH
- Soli Deo Gloria -
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Northwest Georgia
Posts: 14,784

Bikes: 2018 Rodriguez Custom Fixed Gear, 2017 Niner RLT 9 RDO, 2015 Bianchi Pista, 2002 Fuji Robaix

Mentioned: 233 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6822 Post(s)
Liked 652 Times in 410 Posts
Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
I would love to try the new Gore Shakedry stuff.
So would I and I've been >this< close to ordering a C5 1985 Vis jacket.
TimothyH is offline  
Old 02-27-18, 12:19 PM
  #9  
MarcusT
Senior Member
 
MarcusT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: NE Italy
Posts: 671
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 305 Post(s)
Liked 26 Times in 22 Posts
Before the dawn of waterproof breathable fabrics, we used tight woven wool. Not only is it water resistant, it is highly breathable and still keeps you warm even when wet.
There are a few outdoor clothing manufacturers that still produce them, but military surplus is your best source
MarcusT is offline  
Old 02-27-18, 12:54 PM
  #10  
alan s 
Senior Member
 
alan s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 6,715
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1379 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 78 Times in 53 Posts
I rode for 3 hours last fall at night in a heavy downpour on the C&O Towpath, and was reasonably dry and warm, using Performance branded jacket and pants. For all day riding, I’d look into Shower Pass, but wouldn’t expect much improvement.
alan s is online now  
Old 02-27-18, 02:06 PM
  #11  
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 3,516
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1381 Post(s)
Liked 247 Times in 151 Posts
I'm also a newly converted fan to rain capes. They allow me to wear my riding jacket which is water resistant and breathable while getting ventilation from below. They look odd but work very effectively. there are some pricey British ones around of heavier material but I found a nylon rain poncho that works well from IKEA of all places and is lightweight yet very well made - $10. Perfect for around camp too and as an extra cover for my bivy. I combine this with MEC Adanac pants which are also highly water resistant but not proof and breathable.

In the old days I really liked K Way nylon rain jackets. Cheap, light, but not breathable.

Last edited by Happy Feet; 02-27-18 at 02:09 PM.
Happy Feet is offline  
Old 02-27-18, 09:49 PM
  #12  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 5,196

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Salsa Timberjack Ti, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Pink Klein MTB, Phil Wood VeloXS Frame (w/DA 7400), Cilo Road Frame, Proteus frame

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1186 Post(s)
Liked 48 Times in 33 Posts
Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
So would I and I've been >this< close to ordering a C5 1985 Vis jacket.
Luckily I have so many projects going on and so much I need to get to finish these projects that jackets can take a backseat but once I come into enough money and finish my projects I might be >th<is close to ordering one. I think though that won't happen for a long time.
veganbikes is offline  
Old 02-28-18, 01:38 PM
  #13  
WNCGoater
Senior Member
 
WNCGoater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Western NC mountains
Posts: 925

Bikes: Diamondback Century 3. Marin Four Corners

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 413 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
I've come to accept that if it's more than 40-45F, I'm going to get wet when it rains. Over that, I sweat faster than any jacket I've seen can handle the moisture. Below that, pit vents are one key, and a back vent helps a bit if it's not raining too hard, so that I can open the front zipper. A simple wind jacket works just about as well when the outside temperature is higher to keep me warm, since it keeps my warm sweat from evaporating.


I think Goretex and similar one-way moisture barriers fabrics are oversold and overbought, while they under-deliver
.
I agree, that's been my experience too, though limited to backpacking, hiking and other vigorous outdoor activities. While cycling, even during cold weather my challenge has been to stay warm enough without overheating and producing sweat. Staying dry is the key to staying warm, which is difficult when sweating. Throw rain in the mix and that is another obstacle. Now you've added a layer to keep the rain out... which traps the sweat in. I've tried various products, but my experience has found nothing that will vent sweat fast enough and yet keep rain out. Oh a particular garment may keep the rain out as long as your exertion is minimal to non-existent. But start exerting yourself and effectively it rains INSIDE the garment.

So I'm always interested in anything that contradicts ^^ my experience. As it is right now, I just assume if it's raining and I'm riding I'm going to get wet.
WNCGoater is offline  
Old 02-28-18, 06:07 PM
  #14  
LuckySailor
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
LuckySailor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Posts: 649

Bikes: Trek 520 total custom build, Cannondale Mountain Tandem, Oryx Mountain Bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 54 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The poncho idea is an interesting one. I have a Packa, which was custom make for me for hiking. It's made with eVent material, and performed admirably while hiking the Camino last year-but it was only tested once in 4 hours of downpour. It does not fit properly over my bike helmet, otherwise I would use it, even tho there is the extra material to cover my backpack. i despise the idea of buying more products based on the activity. The other raingear that I have used in the past left me in the situation of too much sweat to vent from the fabric. Warmth I generate very well. No problem there.
The Polartec neoshell material looks very interesting after reviewing a number of videos and reading up on it. May give Lou the call to create. He is away currently. the Columbia Outdry EX Gold shells that I have ordered are only a few dollars cheaper. Good warranty though , but I like the idea of giving the job to a small company rather than the big guys getting it fabricated overseas.
LuckySailor is offline  
Old 02-28-18, 06:29 PM
  #15  
PortlandEddie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Portland,OR
Posts: 101

Bikes: Fuji cross

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
gore-tex jacket

https://www.gore-tex.com/product/gor...ry-29036/29036

i live in the PNW and we get rain a cold under 42' normally. I have this jacket and its waterproof and breathable. i got a size too big but for the price i couldn't pass it up. i wish i could swap with someone to a smaller size. I rode for hour and half-ish and i was cold but i was DRY. Hope this helps!
PortlandEddie is offline  
Old 03-01-18, 09:10 AM
  #16  
reppans
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 761

Bikes: Brompton M6R, Specialized Tricross Comp, Ellsworth Isis, Dahon Speed P8

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 307 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Happy Feet View Post
I'm also a newly converted fan to rain capes. They allow me to wear my riding jacket which is water resistant and breathable while getting ventilation from below. They look odd but work very effectively. there are some pricey British ones around of heavier material but I found a nylon rain poncho that works well from IKEA of all places and is lightweight yet very well made - $10. Perfect for around camp too and as an extra cover for my bivy. I combine this with MEC Adanac pants which are also highly water resistant but not proof and breathable.

In the old days I really liked K Way nylon rain jackets. Cheap, light, but not breathable.
Is the poncho used as a waterproof blanket over your bivy, or staked down/strung up as an overhead tarp?
reppans is offline  
Old 03-01-18, 09:44 AM
  #17  
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 3,516
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1381 Post(s)
Liked 247 Times in 151 Posts
Originally Posted by reppans View Post
Is the poncho used as a waterproof blanket over your bivy, or staked down/strung up as an overhead tarp?
No, its not big enough for that. I use my bivy for going light in (expected) good weather. It's a first Gen Integral Designs Gortex bivy with hoop that I would say is water resistant at best. If it were raining I would look for shelter of some sort.

The poncho is here KNALLA Rain poncho - black - IKEA and would make a good cheap first experiment for someone who wanted to try the rain cape route. I think it also comes in other colours. I wrap the leading edge under my hands on the bars. Next time I'm going to IKEA I'm buying a spare.

Last edited by Happy Feet; 03-01-18 at 09:48 AM.
Happy Feet is offline  
Old 03-01-18, 12:55 PM
  #18  
seeker333
-
 
seeker333's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 3,764

Bikes: yes!

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 242 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 13 Posts
Originally Posted by WNCGoater View Post
As it is right now, I just assume if it's raining and I'm riding I'm going to get wet.
That's a safe assumption for bicycling in the SE USA. Except for Winter it's often the case that the rain is not really very cold, and humidity is always high, 60-100%. WP/B fabrics work well in test labs and low humidity areas, i.e. Western USA, but here in The South they are only marginally effective at keeping you dry with any exertion above a medium walking pace. With this in mind, below are a few items I have found effective, as they rely more on direct ventilation than "breathing".

Showers Pass (SP) Transit Jacket - I've owned this jacket for several years, which was previously sold under the name SP Touring Jacket. It is a clone of an earlier popular jacket, the Burley Rock Point rain jacket. Basically this jacket has been around for 20 years. Although the material is claimed to be WP/B, this jacket relies heavily upon ventilation to keep you from becoming sweat-soaked when bicycling. It vents through an effective full width back flap, plus 18" pit zippers. The sleeves are intentionally loose fitting so that air will move through them up your arms, adding more ventilation. The Transit/Touring jacket will absolutely keep out all rain in the heaviest downpour. A hood is sold separately, and it works, even with helmet, connecting to jacket by velcro. The tail on this jacket is longer than other SP jackets. Additionally, the Touring jacket has an 8" flap that snaps out of way when unneeded. The flap has elastic so that when deployed it will snug around the lower part of the buttocks, keeping your derriere completely dry in hard rain. This jacket is very durable and will last for years with reasonable care. The WP zippered pocket will keep the largest phone/phablet bone dry, and has a inner port for earphone cable (I never listen when pedaling, but usually do when walking).

Rainlegs - A unique semi-rain-pant which rolls neatly into small bundle around waist when not needed. Buckle it on if it looks like rain, deploy later as needed. Unroll it, connect two velcro straps under legs, and you're ready to roll in ~15 seconds. Rainlegs block falling rain from waist down to below knees, and work well with a full-fendered bike to protect from splash. In The South they are as good or better than full rain paints - highly ventilated, crotch never gets sweaty, tops of legs stay completely dry. Since they're basically 1/4 the size of rain pants, Rainlegs pack very small and are very lightweight. Worth trying if you are tired of the sauna experience of full rain pants or unwilling to spend $$$ for WP/B pants. Shortly after I bought Rainlegs year ago, I broke the main buckle somehow, my fault, don't recall details. I emailed Rainlegs requesting identification of the buckle's maker so that I could locate a compatible replacement, and to my amazement they spent $10 to 3-day ship me a $1 replacement buckle from Amsterdam. Outstanding customer service!

Carradice Pro-route rain cape - I don't own one, but have wished so for over a decade. Hi-viz yellow and huge area should make you hard to miss (visually) in the rain. Based on many hours of backpacking in rain with WP/non-breathable ponchos, I'm fairly sure this cape offers good rain protection and good convection-assisted ventilation. You have to order from UK, as no one stocks them in USA, not even the Carradice sellers.
seeker333 is offline  
Old 03-01-18, 04:33 PM
  #19  
JohnJ80
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 4,036

Bikes: N+1=5

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 568 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by WNCGoater View Post
I agree, that's been my experience too, though limited to backpacking, hiking and other vigorous outdoor activities. While cycling, even during cold weather my challenge has been to stay warm enough without overheating and producing sweat. Staying dry is the key to staying warm, which is difficult when sweating. Throw rain in the mix and that is another obstacle. Now you've added a layer to keep the rain out... which traps the sweat in. I've tried various products, but my experience has found nothing that will vent sweat fast enough and yet keep rain out. Oh a particular garment may keep the rain out as long as your exertion is minimal to non-existent. But start exerting yourself and effectively it rains INSIDE the garment.

So I'm always interested in anything that contradicts ^^ my experience. As it is right now, I just assume if it's raining and I'm riding I'm going to get wet.
I would agree with you if the material under discussion is gore-Tex. I would disagree with you with respect to eVent (showers pass) and NeoShell. Both of these materials are pretty amazing in their ability to pass
Moisture. In one case, I had a typical breathable lightweight shell on top and Neoshell rain pants on the bottom while hiking in a steady rain. Even my arms were dripping wet under the shell but my legs were bone dry and not even damp during the exact same hike.

I can also attest to staying dry while under exertion in my showers pass elite 2.1 jacket. In addition to the breathable material it has great abdominal venting and a nice vent on the back. I donít even get damp even when under exertion. Expensive? Yes. But it works very well.

Iím going to have Lou Binik of Foxwear make make me a NeoShell hooded jacket for a tour Iím planning this summer in Norway. Very lightweight, super dry and good wind protection all in one.

J.
JohnJ80 is offline  
Old 03-01-18, 04:39 PM
  #20  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 41,396

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 188 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6925 Post(s)
Liked 248 Times in 205 Posts
LBS carries Endura, had Shower's pass.. .. restock was not timely in late spring when Touring cyclists were getting rained on..


The Showers Pass Portland jacket is a Tweed looking fabric heavier with bonded insulation lining..

Last edited by fietsbob; 03-03-18 at 04:13 PM.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 03-01-18, 10:54 PM
  #21  
boomhauer
Senior Member
 
boomhauer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 672
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 176 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by LuckySailor View Post
.... for my upcoming Arctic trip.
What are your thoughts? Anything that you have used that worked for you? Or is this just never gonna happen?
An Arctic trip? Breathable?
Isn't keeping warm job number 1?
I've given up on breathable Gortex style rain gear a couple decades ago. Maybe things are better now?

In the great plains I see the storms coming about 30 minutes before it happens and breathable isn't my first concern.

After getting somewhat soaked I then froze my ass off trying to ride afterwards. My underlayer (wool sweater) would get wet from trying to ride in, what amounts to, 100% humidity.

I found it more effective to wear a ski jacket outer shell, with armpit vents, and wearing a thin non-insulating layer underneath. Maybe this isn't a good idea in the "Arctic" but I personally don't try to really ride for hours in the rain anymore. It seems like a no-win situation.
boomhauer is offline  
Old 03-02-18, 09:45 AM
  #22  
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 3,516
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1381 Post(s)
Liked 247 Times in 151 Posts
Originally Posted by boomhauer View Post
An Arctic trip? Breathable?
Isn't keeping warm job number 1?
I've given up on breathable Gortex style rain gear a couple decades ago. Maybe things are better now?

In the great plains I see the storms coming about 30 minutes before it happens and breathable isn't my first concern.

After getting somewhat soaked I then froze my ass off trying to ride afterwards. My underlayer (wool sweater) would get wet from trying to ride in, what amounts to, 100% humidity.

I found it more effective to wear a ski jacket outer shell, with armpit vents, and wearing a thin non-insulating layer underneath. Maybe this isn't a good idea in the "Arctic" but I personally don't try to really ride for hours in the rain anymore. It seems like a no-win situation.
Same as the Prairies. Love those storms - just not when I'm in them




On a rainy cold tour I wore this old army Nylon overshell. Loose fitting, completely water proof, covered my thighs when riding but more importantly wind roof. It created a sort of warm microclimate inside. Some days I rode all day in it. I have also given up on breathable for the most part. I use fast drying clothes and a shell of some sort for the downpours.




Last edited by Happy Feet; 03-02-18 at 09:54 AM.
Happy Feet is offline  
Old 03-02-18, 01:27 PM
  #23  
PedalingWalrus
Senior Member
 
PedalingWalrus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Maine, USA
Posts: 879

Bikes: Surly Ice Cream Truck, Surly Disk Trucker, Salsa Warbird, Salsa Beargrease, Dandelion Dream Tandem

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 269 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 22 Times in 15 Posts
In regards to a poncho...doesn't the wind pick up the bottoms and flip it up to your chest or, god forbid, into your face?
PedalingWalrus is offline  
Old 03-02-18, 01:40 PM
  #24  
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 3,516
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1381 Post(s)
Liked 247 Times in 151 Posts
I pin the leading edge under my hands on the bars. I think some specific bicycle rain Capes may have loops for the hands. This keeps your arms dry too. Tension it just right and the rain rolls right off.

What I like about it is that I am usually too lazy to stop and don a full set of rain gear when the first hint of rain begins, being the eternal optimist. Then, when it looks like rain is there to stay I am already too wet for it to matter. The cape/poncho is very quick and easy to don/doff and keeps the bulk of the rain off.

Last edited by Happy Feet; 03-02-18 at 01:49 PM.
Happy Feet is offline  
Old 03-02-18, 02:05 PM
  #25  
PedalingWalrus
Senior Member
 
PedalingWalrus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Maine, USA
Posts: 879

Bikes: Surly Ice Cream Truck, Surly Disk Trucker, Salsa Warbird, Salsa Beargrease, Dandelion Dream Tandem

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 269 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 22 Times in 15 Posts
Thanks for the tip. Perhaps voile straps would be nice to pin the poncho to the handlebars. My poncho is wicked light...sometimes it is a challenge to put it on in fierce winds on mountain peaks because it flaps around so much I lose track where the head opening is 🙂
PedalingWalrus is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.