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Marathon Plus for Fuji Touring

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Marathon Plus for Fuji Touring

Old 03-02-18, 05:47 AM
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rafiqcmnet
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Marathon Plus for Fuji Touring

My Fuji Touring comes with stock 32-622 tires which I want to replace with Marathon Plus.
My LBS says they only have 700c x 35mm (37-622 ISO) - see below as reference.
My bike is fitted with fenders SKS Bluemels 45 mm.

Please advise me if I can go ahead changing my tires without any problems.

========================

C&P from a website:

This version of the Marathon Plus is available in:

700c x 25mm (25-622 ISO; 115 Max PSI),
700c x 28mm (28-622 ISO; 100 Max PSI),
700c x 32mm (32-622 ISO; 95 Max PSI),
700c x 35mm (37-622 ISO; 85 max. PSI),
700c x 38mm (40-622 ISO; 85 max. PSI), and
700c x 47mm (47-622 ISO; 75 max PSI).

Wire bead. Black/Reflective Stripe.

Please note that due to its extra-thick tread, this tire runs ~2mm wider/taller than typical Schwalbe tires. As such, the ISO width printed on the sidewall is actually greater than the common size printed on the tire (example: 700c x 35mm = 37-622 ISO). To avoid confusion, we sell this tire by its common 700c measurement, not its wider ISO measurement.
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Old 03-02-18, 06:09 AM
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staehpj1 
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They should fit, but fender clearance will be reduced. I put 32 mm Marathon Pluses on my Windsor Touring (pretty much a rebranded Fuji) and there was a little room left.

FWIW I hated them. I found them stiff and heavy. They weighed a little more than twice what other suitable tires do. In 700 x 35 a pair of them weigh 4 pounds well over double what my preferred tires weigh.

Additionally the rolling resistance is noticeably higher.

That said neither weight nor rolling resistance are my biggest complaint. The stiff sidewalls give the opposite of a lively ride of more supple sidewalls. I value a lively feeling tire so the MP is a non starter.

If weight and rolling resistance are not something you worry about and you want the best flat resistance above all else they may be for you, but I rode a few hundred miles on them and took them off and sold them.
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Old 03-02-18, 06:47 AM
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rafiqcmnet
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Your review makes sense for me to look for other brands and just stick to 32.

Since I am riding on paved roads, why should I burden myself with heavier tires w/ higher rolling resistance? After all I am equipped with spare tubes, a repair kit, C02 canisters and reliable pump. Yeah, too much hype on MPs.

"I value a lively feeling tire ..." I am with you on this one

Thank you
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Old 03-02-18, 03:26 PM
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robert schlatte
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I have Schwalbe regular (green guard) marathons 35mm on my Soma Saga and yes, they are heavy and stiff,... but the good news is you don't have to worry about flats as much. I have been stuck by the side of the road searching my tire for whatever minute little object embedded in my tire is causing it to go flat. That is a PIA in the worst sense of the term.
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Old 03-02-18, 03:36 PM
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tyrion
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Schwalbe Supremes 35mm are a good compromise of road feel, efficiency, and puncture resistance. IMO.
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Old 03-02-18, 10:22 PM
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I hate punctures with a passion.

This years tour will take a different approach in that I'll be undertaking more off tarmac than usual.

I've been experimenting with what is known as a "ghetto tubeless" setup with what appears to be success.

Utilising a 20x406 split tube on my 700c Velocity Dyad rim, I've added a 2.30 Exiwolf knobbly tire with liquid latex added before inflation.

For this tour, instead of taking a single folding emergency tire/tube, I'll be taking two, given I tow a trailer.

If a tire or tubeless setup suffers a catastrophic failure, I'll simply return to my default setting of folding Marathon Mondials all round in 2.00 with a tube.

I'll update with a thread of my tour on its completion to let others know of the success or failure of my experiment.

I've posted this as a possibility for the OP to consider as a direction.
I don't know how the latex would go in a high pressure tire.

As for the Supremes, I have them for local use, enjoying their lightness, but they are not a tire for my tours lacking the "duty" for puncture deflection of heavier Marathon tires.

Perhaps any success of this tubeless idea might see a return to the possibility of the lighter Supreme as my go to road touring tire.

When towing a trailer, mostly for water in my case, a puncture is a major PITA, given it requires removal of trailer and then all panniers, given a propensity for my flats to occur mostly away from any trees or convenient items to lean my bike against.

Last edited by rifraf; 03-02-18 at 10:30 PM.
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Old 03-03-18, 02:16 AM
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rafiqcmnet
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I heard about this ghetto tubeless method during my MTB days but I had never attempted it though the process may not be laborious.

Your post me leave me wondering, as an (easier) option, if Touring Bikers inject Green Slime directly into the tube.
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Old 03-03-18, 03:50 AM
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Originally Posted by rafiqcmnet View Post
I heard about this ghetto tubeless method during my MTB days but I had never attempted it though the process may not be laborious.

Your post me leave me wondering, as an (easier) option, if Touring Bikers inject Green Slime directly into the tube.
I did something like this: Ghetto tubeless conversion DIY: tips and tricks | Ridemonkey Forums
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