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Looking at disc brakes for light touring. Difficulty: S&S couples or Rinko

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Looking at disc brakes for light touring. Difficulty: S&S couples or Rinko

Old 03-05-18, 05:13 PM
  #1  
reverborama
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Looking at disc brakes for light touring. Difficulty: S&S couples or Rinko

I've done three week+ long bike tours in Europe using bikes provided by the tour companies. I'd like to bring my own so I'm building up a light touring bike with 42mm 650b wheels. I'm trying to figure out which are the best disc brakes for this sort of project.

I may set the bike up with S&S couplers so I can ship it cheaply to Europe. I'm also interested in setting it up for Rinko so I can take trains without purchasing an extra ticket. This has me leaning towards cable operated brakes but the only two decent choices seem to be TRP Spyre and Rever. Recently there have been a lot of complaints about the Sprye's adjustment screw backing out on its own after a period of use. The Rever looks like it works exactly the same way. I don't think hydraulic brakes -- at least the kind with the reservoir in the lever -- will work well with a bike you want to break down.

Is anyone here using discs with S&S couplers or Rinko? What are you using for brakes?
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Old 03-05-18, 05:30 PM
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cable disc brakes, open cable runs between frame stops , mean you can run cable splitters that unscrew and screw back together..

I got a Bike Friday , hard to pack a bike smaller than its wheels .. so 406 20" wheels are a winner..

toured Europe 3 X just used a normal bike , no couplers 700c wheels , no problems * but that was before 'that' 911.

*AMS Shiphol Airport has Boxes..






.....
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Old 03-05-18, 06:05 PM
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I use rim brakes on my S&S bike, not disc.

Since I have not packed up a disc brake in a case, I can only relay that I have heard from others that centerlock makes it easier to remove the disc to avoid damage when you pack the wheels in the case.

I have TRP Spyre on another bike that I built up this past spring, i have not had any problems with it and I did not have any screws backing out on their own. If I did, I would put a dab of blue Loctite on them and immediately forget about it. That is my one and only disc brake, so I can't offer any comparisons.

I am not sure what Alan S uses for brakes on his S&S bike, if he does not say anything, send him a message. He might use discs.

When I was in Iceland I met a couple that were riding really light weight with bikepacking gear. They were riding bikes that used the Ritchey Breakaway system. I think that system is only used on pretty light weight bikes, not sure how much weight you want to carry on your bike and if the Ritchey system is too light duty or not, I only mention it in case you are not aware of that option.
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Old 03-05-18, 06:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
I use rim brakes on my S&S bike, not disc.

Since I have not packed up a disc brake in a case, I can only relay that I have heard from others that centerlock makes it easier to remove the disc to avoid damage when you pack the wheels in the case.

I have TRP Spyre on another bike that I built up this past spring, i have not had any problems with it and I did not have any screws backing out on their own. If I did, I would put a dab of blue Loctite on them and immediately forget about it. That is my one and only disc brake, so I can't offer any comparisons.

I am not sure what Alan S uses for brakes on his S&S bike, if he does not say anything, send him a message. He might use discs.

When I was in Iceland I met a couple that were riding really light weight with bikepacking gear. They were riding bikes that used the Ritchey Breakaway system. I think that system is only used on pretty light weight bikes, not sure how much weight you want to carry on your bike and if the Ritchey system is too light duty or not, I only mention it in case you are not aware of that option.
I use hydraulic disc brakes. Completely remove from the bike, which is easier than you might think. Everything is sealed, and cable ties are used to attach to the bike. You have to put the spacers between the pads to keep the calipers open. Also remove the 6-bolt rotors from the wheels. I carry on all components in ziplock bags in a backpack on the plane. TSA usually takes one look in the bag and waves me through. One TSA employee asked me to remove everything from the backpack, but quickly asked me to move along.
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Old 03-05-18, 07:08 PM
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Originally Posted by reverborama View Post
I've done three week+ long bike tours in Europe using bikes provided by the tour companies. I'd like to bring my own so I'm building up a light touring bike with 42mm 650b wheels. I'm trying to figure out which are the best disc brakes for this sort of project.

I may set the bike up with S&S couplers so I can ship it cheaply to Europe. I'm also interested in setting it up for Rinko so I can take trains without purchasing an extra ticket. This has me leaning towards cable operated brakes but the only two decent choices seem to be TRP Spyre and Rever. Recently there have been a lot of complaints about the Sprye's adjustment screw backing out on its own after a period of use. The Rever looks like it works exactly the same way. I don't think hydraulic brakes -- at least the kind with the reservoir in the lever -- will work well with a bike you want to break down.

Is anyone here using discs with S&S couplers or Rinko? What are you using for brakes?
I have a similar problem with what I want to do with my bike. I opted against adding couplers since my bike was already built and itís pretty expensive since it would require a painting as well as the couplers. What I am doing is going the way of the Airport Ninja case from Orucase. It takes me about 15 minutes or so to pack my bike in the case. Even if this method is not entirely successful and if I have to pay the occasional fee, it would be a long time before I get to the expense of adding the couplers AND having to buy a case for the coupler bike.

I also looked at building a disc brake bike just for this purpose. Hydraulic brakes would be a mess, so like you, I was going to opt for cable brakes. The TRP brakes looked nice, but Paulís Components also have a very nice, simple cable driven brake that I would probably use.

J.
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Old 03-05-18, 07:40 PM
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Originally Posted by reverborama View Post
... What are you using for brakes?
In the USA, Avid BB7 disc brakes have likely outsold all other mechanical (cable) disc brakes combined by a factor of 10 or more. They're relatively inexpensive and they work pretty good.

As mentioned in #3, centerlock hubs are a good idea for packing a disc tourer in a travel case. Only two fasteners to loosen/tighten versus 12. Keeps rotors from bending, and scratching other components.

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Old 03-05-18, 09:08 PM
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I'm using S&S Disc Trucker with BB7 brakes. Should have got center-lock. Otherwise the BB7's are working well esp with upgraded pads. Hydros might be nice for a hilly tour. I considered switching to TRP Hylex but leery of reputed excess lever travel.
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Old 03-05-18, 09:11 PM
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I have TRP Spyre brakes on my S and S coupled bike with cable splitters. Works a treat. I've had no problems with the Spyre brakes at all.

I've heard that Paul Klampers are the be all end all of mechanical disk brakes, but I have no direct experience.
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Old 03-05-18, 11:20 PM
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No word on S+S or Rinko set ups though I may do that at some point. I do however have Spyres and haven't had issues with anything backing out in 3 years of using them. I did recently upgrade/replace pads and rotor and they still feel great. The Paul Klampers do intrigue me but I like the dual piston concept and don't really want to change. If I build up a single speed mountain bike I will probably go with Klampers since my goal would be to do it MUSA as much as possible, which aside from tubes, tires and chain I could do (maybe rotors as well, I am not sure)

As people have said Centerlock rotors and hubs might be practical for ease of removal but since my touring bike doesn't Rinko or couple I don't really worry.
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Old 03-06-18, 12:11 AM
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We have S&S couplers on our tandem and have flown many times over the last 13yrs since we bought it.
Definitely money well spent. They have been absolutely flawless.
We switched from BB7 to Spyres and they have been much better in my opinion. Much easier to keep adjusted and i like the feel of the brakes better.
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Old 03-06-18, 09:33 AM
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I rinko my CX and folding MTB all the time. No need to remove brakes when doing that, the wheels comes off, seat post goes down and it all gets shoved in the bag. I usually manage it with just the front wheel coming off.

I have Spyres on the CX bike and hydraulics up front on the folder, never had any problems with them. I imagine coupled bikes aren't that hard to deal with when running hydros either, given how easy they are to install and adjust.

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Old 03-06-18, 02:37 PM
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I did go with 6-bolt for the hubs. I figured if I needed to replace a spoke out in the field, that would be easier. I'll definitely be checking out that Airport Ninja case. If that means not needed the S&S couplers yet still avoiding the up-charge for taking a bike on a plane, I'm in. I especially like the idea that method of disassembly for shipping is closely related to Rinkoing (is that a word?) the bike.

I'm going to dig a little deeper into the brakes and find someone here who's actually using the Spyres and Revers so I can get a good look at them.
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Old 03-06-18, 03:02 PM
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It's all at the discretion of the airline... SAS , SeaTac to AMS , I was not charged a bike fee, but I was on Horizon,
the connecting flight from Eugene.. to Seattle..
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Old 03-06-18, 03:41 PM
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Originally Posted by reverborama View Post
I did go with 6-bolt for the hubs. I figured if I needed to replace a spoke out in the field, that would be easier. I'll definitely be checking out that Airport Ninja case. If that means not needed the S&S couplers yet still avoiding the up-charge for taking a bike on a plane, I'm in. I especially like the idea that method of disassembly for shipping is closely related to Rinkoing (is that a word?) the bike.

I'm going to dig a little deeper into the brakes and find someone here who's actually using the Spyres and Revers so I can get a good look at them.
With a T-25 socket and small ratchet, it takes about a minute per wheel to remove or install the rotors. Not much time, considering the difficulty you face having a bent rotor. Centerlocks would probably save you a minute or so.
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Old 03-06-18, 03:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
When I was in Iceland I met a couple that were riding really light weight with bikepacking gear. They were riding bikes that used the Ritchey Breakaway system. I think that system is only used on pretty light weight bikes, not sure how much weight you want to carry on your bike and if the Ritchey system is too light duty or not, I only mention it in case you are not aware of that option.
The Ritchey breakaway system is used on road bikes (light duty), cross bikes (should be robust enough for light touring), and "expedition" frames.

https://ritcheylogic.com/break-away-ascent-frameset
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Old 03-06-18, 03:58 PM
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Originally Posted by reverborama View Post
I may set the bike up with S&S couplers so I can ship it cheaply to Europe.
It's may be cheaper to pay an extra baggage fee than it would be to ship internationally.
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Old 03-06-18, 05:08 PM
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Have a cassette wheel ?same shimano spline lockring tool works on the centerlock..
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Old 03-06-18, 05:28 PM
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Originally Posted by reverborama View Post
...
I'm going to dig a little deeper into the brakes and find someone here who's actually using the Spyres and Revers so I can get a good look at them.
Here is a look at mine. Spyre comes in two versions, post mount and flat mount. Photo is of the post mount on my Lynskey. If the configureation looks confusing, the Lynskey has three bolts that attach a post mount to the frame chain stay, then the brake is attached to that mount. They do that so one frame can use different mounts.

I am not familiar with Revers.

Spyre recommends compressionless cable, which I used. This is my only disc brake so I can't comment on others or comment on non-compressionless cable.
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Old 03-06-18, 09:36 PM
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I read that some folks prefer the Spyre over the Rever--supposedly the Spyre has less lever travel.
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Old 03-07-18, 07:29 AM
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Originally Posted by reverborama View Post
I may set the bike up with S&S couplers so I can ship it cheaply to Europe.
I've been to Europe twice with bikes, it was a grand total of about $150 in bike fees for full size, non collapsible ones, including the $50 on Air Canada I didn't pay.

Just saying if you are smart about it, it isn't extravagant in costs if those are your only reasons for having a folder.
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Old 03-07-18, 11:21 PM
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Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
I've been to Europe twice with bikes, it was a grand total of about $150 in bike fees for full size, non collapsible ones, including the $50 on Air Canada I didn't pay.

Just saying if you are smart about it, it isn't extravagant in costs if those are your only reasons for having a folder.
If building up a new bike I wouldn't get S&S again. It can be great for folks who do a lot of air travel: they eventually save money plus get the packing down pat. But for me packing/unpacking the Disc Trucker is time-consuming & tedious. Touring bikes are relatively big so the packing has to be done in strict order & racks/fenders may have to be carried separately. Assembly is not convenient w/o the home work stand.

Taxi & airline bike fee costs some money but one must consider that S&S cuts into precious vacation hours?
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Old 03-08-18, 03:22 AM
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Depending on where you're flying, keep in mind that other countries aren't so extremely capitalist about everything and try to push the limits and get Every penny the market will bear, so bike fees are much cheaper for non US airlines. US airlines are likely to cost you $150+ more each way compared to basically any other airline.
Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
I can only relay that I have heard from others that centerlock makes it easier to remove the disc to avoid damage when you pack the wheels in the case.
I would have to Strongly disagree. I totally blanked on the fact that my Alfine dynohub had a centerlock mount when I bought it. What a freakin' pain in the ass that is! If I want to be able to pull the rotor on a normal 6 bolt rotor, I just need a bike multi-tool. If I want to pull a centerlock rotor, I need a cassette removal tool and appropriate large wrench or something to turn the stupid thing. I don't want to haul an extra tool and a big wrench on tour just to pull a brake rotor. WTF Shimano? Worst idea ever! It's not even a good idea on a daily commuter bike or something. What if my bike falls over or the rotor gets bent when someone shoves their bike into the bike rack? Now I can't just pull the rotor so I can at least ride my bike somewhere to fix it. I'm just stuck there with a bent rotor. I suppose it probably keeps more people taking their bikes into the shop and having them buy repacement Shimano parts at MSRP rather than people doing it themselves, though. Gotta keep that money flow...

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Old 03-08-18, 09:12 AM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by 3speed View Post
If I want to be able to pull the rotor on a normal 6 bolt rotor, I just need a bike multi-tool. If I want to pull a centerlock rotor, I need a cassette removal tool and appropriate large wrench or something to turn the stupid thing. I don't want to haul an extra tool and a big wrench on tour just to pull a brake rotor.

Quite a few people here carry a cassette removal tool anyway, so it's just not an issue for them. Also, I've never needed a "large wrench" for removing a centerlock rotor. One of the longer hex wrenches (that I also carry anyway) will fit in my cheap removal tool and it works fine. I know a couple of people in the MTB crowd who had inserts fabricated that allow for the same thing.

Also, just wanna throw it out there that I can't stand bicycle multitools. I find it easier to just get some loose bits and roll them up in a rag or something with a shoelace sewn on so I can tie it all together.

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Old 03-08-18, 10:35 AM
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Leave the centerlock rotor removal tools with your stored S&S travel case, since they're normally needed only for assembly/disassembly.

Better yet, don't use a coupled bike, then no travel case storage or tools required, nor time wasted building and unbuilding a bike every trip.

FYI: Spyre recall
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Old 03-08-18, 10:37 AM
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Originally Posted by 3speed View Post
What if my bike falls over or the rotor gets bent when someone shoves their bike into the bike rack? Now I can't just pull the rotor so I can at least ride my bike somewhere to fix it. I'm just stuck there with a bent rotor. I suppose it probably keeps more people taking their bikes into the shop and having them buy repacement Shimano parts at MSRP rather than people doing it themselves, though. Gotta keep that money flow...
If I happen to come across you by the side of the road with a bent rotor such that you are unable to ride your bike (however unlikely that is), I will help you remove the caliper so you can continue on your way.
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