Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

A Couple/few Questions...

Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

A Couple/few Questions...

Reply

Old 03-13-18, 09:41 AM
  #1  
munkeyfish
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: St. Augustine, FL.
Posts: 118

Bikes: 2016 Specialized Crosstrails Disc.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 72 Post(s)
A Couple/few Questions...

Could a good touring/adventure bike double as a good commuter bike?

Is there a specific gearing one should look for to do mostly roads and some trails?

And being totally new, could you recommend some good sites that have great info for beginners and beyond? Looking for touring/bikebacking/commuting ideas/sites.

Thanks for any input.
munkeyfish is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-18, 10:23 AM
  #2  
skimaxpower
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: WA
Posts: 340
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Originally Posted by munkeyfish View Post
Could a good touring/adventure bike double as a good commuter bike?
Yes. Absolutely.

Originally Posted by munkeyfish View Post
Is there a specific gearing one should look for to do mostly roads and some trails?
Depends how hard you like to pedal! A 3x drivetrain offers the most range - very common on touring bikes for the past 20 years. A "compact double" crankset would probably work as well. Many pricey adventure bikes are now coming with 1x11 drivetrains.
Avoid road race gearing with a traditional (eg: 53 tooth) crankset up front and/or short cage rear derailleur.

Originally Posted by munkeyfish View Post
And being totally new, could you recommend some good sites that have great info for beginners and beyond? Looking for touring/bikebacking/commuting ideas/sites.
Lots of great (somewhat dated) but accurate bike tech info at: Sheldon Brown-Bicycle Technical Information
skimaxpower is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-18, 10:26 AM
  #3  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 18,455
Mentioned: 120 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6110 Post(s)
I commute/run errands using my LHT.
indyfabz is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-18, 10:44 AM
  #4  
munkeyfish
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: St. Augustine, FL.
Posts: 118

Bikes: 2016 Specialized Crosstrails Disc.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 72 Post(s)
Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
I commute/run errands using my LHT.
I'm eyeballing the Ogre myself....
munkeyfish is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-18, 10:46 AM
  #5  
munkeyfish
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: St. Augustine, FL.
Posts: 118

Bikes: 2016 Specialized Crosstrails Disc.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 72 Post(s)
Originally Posted by skimaxpower View Post
Yes. Absolutely.


Depends how hard you like to pedal! A 3x drivetrain offers the most range - very common on touring bikes for the past 20 years. A "compact double" crankset would probably work as well. Many pricey adventure bikes are now coming with 1x11 drivetrains.
Avoid road race gearing with a traditional (eg: 53 tooth) crankset up front and/or short cage rear derailleur.


Lots of great (somewhat dated) but accurate bike tech info at: Sheldon Brown-Bicycle Technical Information
Thank you, I will dig into that site for sure.
munkeyfish is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-18, 10:50 AM
  #6  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 4,937

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, Perfekt 3 Speed -age unknown, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 893 Post(s)
Commuting bike and touring bike have a lot in common, they both are designed to be easy to ride and hold a straight line well, thus they both handle pretty much the same way. Where they often differ is that a commuting bike usually carries a lot less weight on it than a touring bike so it can be lighter frame and lighter duty rims. A lot of touring bikes rarely need a headlamp, commuting bikes often need one for year around commuting. Both kinds of bikes will be ridden in all kinds of weather too, thus fenders are common on both types of bikes.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-18, 12:08 PM
  #7  
seeker333
-
 
seeker333's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 3,561

Bikes: yes!

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 173 Post(s)
Originally Posted by munkeyfish View Post
Could a good touring/adventure bike double as a good commuter bike? Is there a specific gearing one should look for to do mostly roads and some trails? And being totally new, could you recommend some good sites that have great info for beginners and beyond?...
Dedicated touring bikes make good commuters since they accept full fenders and racks, although less gear is normally needed for commute (lunch, clothes, raingear, toiletries, locks, panniers for groceries). You definitely need front and rear lights for commuting, less so for touring depending on local prevailing law on bicycle lighting requirements.

Gearing-wise, for most folks the lower the gears the better. Many tourers are built with mountain bike gearing to handle heavy loads and steep grades. Low gearing is usually less critical for commuting, you could swap cassette and chain for slightly higher, narrower-spaced gears - cheaper than a second bike.

Some commuters lack secure off-street storage for their bikes, so they resort to using bikes which may appear undesirable to potential bike thieves (although your average crackhead doesn't know a Phil Wood hub from a Brooks saddle). I would find it difficult to leave a $XXXX touring bike on the side of a city street all day, every day. Some feel the same about taking their nice touring bike to sketchy foreign locations for touring.

You need to look no further than bikeforums.net for discussion of all topics pertaining to bicycling. If you have a specific interest, you can more quickly find relevant information via google search.
seeker333 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-18, 01:45 PM
  #8  
WNCGoater
Senior Member
 
WNCGoater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Western NC mountains
Posts: 921

Bikes: Diamondback Century 3. Marin Four Corners

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 405 Post(s)
https://www.adventurecycling.org/

https://www.cyclingabout.com/

https://bicycletouringpro.com/
WNCGoater is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-18, 02:21 PM
  #9  
alan s 
Senior Member
 
alan s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 6,087
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 973 Post(s)
You’ll usually get an answer right here on BF on page 1 of any given thread. Beyond that all bets are off and it usually devolves into a pissing match or is hijacked.
alan s is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-18, 02:45 PM
  #10  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 34,935

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 126 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4877 Post(s)
And being totally new, could you recommend some good sites that have great info for beginners and beyond? Looking for touring/bikebacking/commuting ideas/sites.
CGOAB https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/
fietsbob is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service