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First tour: Could use some advice!

Old 04-18-18, 05:46 PM
  #1  
FlippinFlags
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First tour: Could use some advice!

First tour: Don't know if I'll like it but I want to give it a shot.. Buying a bike and gear.. Could use some advice..

I have very little biking experience besides riding around the neighborhood as a kid and riding 19 miles a day for about a month..

But ever since I met a 70 year old guy down in the Florida Keys who rode from Iowa? and then meeting a few others in the past few years along with some research I'm committed to giving it a try.

I'm flying to Asia soon, was thinking Singapore and riding my way north to Malaysia, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam etc..

I will plan on camping out in between big cities in which I will be staying in hostels.

Since I'm new to the sport and am fully ok with not enjoying it and selling all my gear within the first few weeks or months so what should I do?

When you put together the bike and all the gear you need it adds up quick.. probably around $4,000+ so I was thinking of just starting out with cheaper, low end gear for my "trial period".. where I think I can easily get everything I need for under $1,000.. so if I decide it's not for me it would be easier to just sell and get rid of all of it.

I'm 99% sold on getting a folding bicycle as I want the option of jumping cars, buses, trains easily. I also go sailing in between land travel.. I'm considering getting a standard bike as a "starter bike" though..

Anyone else start out in my shoes?

Or have any thoughts? Any advice is welcome!

Thanks!

Last edited by FlippinFlags; 04-18-18 at 06:56 PM.
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Old 04-18-18, 06:19 PM
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A couple of notes and considerations (from one who lives and travels in SEAsia.)

Weather - you need to plan with the weather in mind. High temperature (90-100F), high humidity, strong sun rays and torrential downpours are not to be triffled with. What months are we talking about?

Camping - SEAsia for the most part lacks campgrounds as such. Cheap accomodation can be found in many places instead.

Routes - study them well in advance. In many places it will be nearly impossible to avoid big roads with big traffic. SEAsia is not all rice fields and idyllic country roads.

I suggest basing yourself initially in a small town (Luang Prabang, Siem Reap, Ubud, Hoi An, Chiang Mai) and doing day tours initially.

Taiwan, Korea and Japan - those are the countries best set up for cycling. That's where I'd go first.




Originally Posted by FlippinFlags View Post
First tour: Don't know if I'll like it but I want to give it a shot.. Buying a bike and gear.. Could use some advice..

I have very little biking experience besides riding around the neighborhood as a kid and riding 19 miles a day for about a month..

But ever since I met a 70 year old guy down in the Florida Keys who rode from Iowa? and then meeting a few others in the past few years along with some research I'm committed to giving it a try.

I'm flying to Asia soon, was thinking Singapore and riding my way north to Malaysia, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam etc..

I will plan on camping out in between big cities in which I will be staying in hostels.

Since I'm new to the sport and am fully ok with not enjoying it and selling all my gear within the first few weeks or months so what should I do?

When you put together the bike and all the gear you need it adds up quick.. probably around $4,000+ so I was thinking of just starting out with cheaper, low end gear for my "trial period".. where I think I can easily get everything I need for under $1,000.. so if I decide it's not for me it would be easier to just sell and get rid of all of it.

Anyone else start out in my shoes?

Or have any thoughts? Any advice is welcome!

Thanks!
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Old 04-18-18, 06:32 PM
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Yes I'm familiar with the sun, temps, humidity and rain.

I plan on stealth camping with a small tent for me, my limited gear and a folding bike. I will stay in hostels in larger cities. I don't plan on staying in any campgrounds etc.

Where is the best place to look for the best bicycle routes when going through countries?

I'm pretty much set on starting in Singapore and making my way north. There is no rush or time constraints on this trip.

Any thoughts on what type gear to start out with, taking into consideration my situation as outlined in my initial post?

Originally Posted by Abu Mahendra View Post
A couple of notes and considerations (from one who lives and travels in SEAsia.)

Weather - you need to plan with the weather in mind. High temperature (90-100F), high humidity, strong sun rays and torrential downpours are not to be triffled with. What months are we talking about?

Camping - SEAsia for the most part lacks campgrounds as such. Cheap accomodation can be found in many places instead.

Routes - study them well in advance. In many places it will be nearly impossible to avoid big roads with big traffic. SEAsia is not all rice fields and idyllic country roads.

I suggest basing yourself initially in a small town (Luang Prabang, Siem Reap, Ubud, Hoi An, Chiang Mai) and doing day tours initially.

Taiwan, Korea and Japan - those are the countries best set up for cycling. That's where I'd go first.
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Old 04-18-18, 06:42 PM
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Well, it sounds like you have it mostly figured out. I'd start in Penang and head north into Thailand from there. Take as little as necessary.



I tour on a folding bike, just finished a tour of Taiwan. Feel free to ask specific questions...


Originally Posted by FlippinFlags View Post
Yes I'm familiar with the sun, temps, humidity and rain.

I plan on stealth camping with a small tent for me, my limited gear and a folding bike. I will stay in hostels in larger cities. I don't plan on staying in any campgrounds etc.

Where is the best place to look for the best bicycle routes when going through countries?

I'm pretty much set on starting in Singapore and making my way north. There is no rush or time constraints on this trip.

Any thoughts on what type gear to start out with, taking into consideration my situation as outlined in my initial post?
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Old 04-18-18, 06:43 PM
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Number one. Don't cheap out on panniers. A good pair will last you the rest of your life (pretty much). A cheap pair could give you all kind of headaches including a crash as happened to a friend of mine. And what did he do when he got home? Yep it got Nashbar to exchange for the same exact pair.

You don't need to spend a fortune on a bike but don't cheap out either. The most important thing is to make sure it is mechanically sound.

Don't bite off more than you can chew. Before you go on that big trip, , load up for a tour and do a couple of loops around the block. Get used to handling the bike under load. Then plan an overnight or weekend. You don't need to do a lot of miles. What you are figuring out here is all of the little things that no one told you can go wrong, items you forgot to bring along or items you really didn't need.

When you make a stop, hang your helmet with gloves etc inside on your bike. Don't ask me how I know this but it is a very important tip.

Lastly have fun!
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Old 04-18-18, 06:49 PM
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Hostel tip. Never leave anything of value anywhere except with you. Even take them into the shower. You can put them in a waterproof bag or handlebar bag. Don't trust the locker. Try to find a bunk next to the wall. Wear your wallet and passport in a purse around your neck. Place the rest between you and the wall.
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Old 04-18-18, 06:55 PM
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I've checked out your bike quite a few times, it's a beauty. What was your first touring bicycle? How often do you take advantage of folding? Where do you typically stay? Do you use transportation at all, or just bike? How minimal do you pack when touring? What bike bags do you use?

Thanks!

Originally Posted by Abu Mahendra View Post
Well, it sounds like you have it mostly figured out. I'd start in Penang and head north into Thailand from there. Take as little as necessary.

I tour on a folding bike, just finished a tour of Taiwan. Feel free to ask specific questions...
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Old 04-18-18, 07:01 PM
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That's the big debate, I like nicer things.. but as pertaining to my post, I'm debating on going ultra cheap to get through the first month or two.. if I don't enjoy it, I can sell the bike and gear for a minimal loss, versus losing thousands etc.. Once I'm in Asia I don't plan on coming back to the USA for at least a few years..

I will be going with frame bags, no panniers.

Cheap gear meaning, $300-$500 bike, $50 tent, $50 mattress, $50 sleeping bag, $50-$75 bike bags, $150 helmet, tools, couple cycle shirts, a pair of cycle shorts etc. under $1,000 etc..

I won't be able to do a small tour but will probably put in at least 100 miles locally, with a few of those trips with my gear to get the proper set up..

Originally Posted by spinnaker View Post
Number one. Don't cheap out on panniers. A good pair will last you the rest of your life (pretty much). A cheap pair could give you all kind of headaches including a crash as happened to a friend of mine. And what did he do when he got home? Yep it got Nashbar to exchange for the same exact pair.

You don't need to spend a fortune on a bike but don't cheap out either. The most important thing is to make sure it is mechanically sound.

Don't bite off more than you can chew. Before you go on that big trip, , load up for a tour and do a couple of loops around the block. Get used to handling the bike under load. Then plan an overnight or weekend. You don't need to do a lot of miles. What you are figuring out here is all of the little things that no one told you can go wrong, items you forgot to bring along or items you really didn't need.

When you make a stop, hang your helmet with gloves etc inside on your bike. Don't ask me how I know this but it is a very important tip.

Lastly have fun!
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Old 04-18-18, 07:04 PM
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Yes I also try to find hostels with lockers, and plan on packing my bike into a bag before going into the hostel to try and hide what's in the bag, lock up the zippers, and lock the bag with my other stuff to my bed post, otherwise put whatever fits into a locker which will be locked.. this will definitely be a lot harder than just traveling with a small backpack..

Originally Posted by spinnaker View Post
Hostel tip. Never leave anything of value anywhere except with you. Even take them into the shower. You can put them in a waterproof bag or handlebar bag. Don't trust the locker. Try to find a bunk next to the wall. Wear your wallet and passport in a purse around your neck. Place the rest between you and the wall.
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Old 04-18-18, 07:10 PM
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Originally Posted by FlippinFlags View Post
Yes I also try to find hostels with lockers, and plan on packing my bike into a bag before going into the hostel to try and hide what's in the bag, lock up the zippers, and lock the bag with my other stuff to my bed post, otherwise put whatever fits into a locker which will be locked.. this will definitely be a lot harder than just traveling with a small backpack..

Just don't put your wallet or passport into the locker. Keep it with you at ALL times. DO NOT put that in a locker.
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Old 04-18-18, 07:35 PM
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Originally Posted by FlippinFlags View Post
I've checked out your bike quite a few times, it's a beauty. What was your first touring bicycle? How often do you take advantage of folding? Where do you typically stay? Do you use transportation at all, or just bike? How minimal do you pack when touring? What bike bags do you use?

Thanks!
The first bike i toured on what a rigid Cannondale MTB in the late 1990s.

I don't fold/unfold it very often, but when i do, it's worth it. Most recently i folded it while on tour so i could take an express train. Otherwise it would have been two hours more on the non-express run.



An often unappreciated characteristic of small wheel bikes is they are less cumbersome and ackward to maneuver in dense urban spaces. They are often tolerated in spaces where big bikes would not. They are less intimidating, and fit in places where a big bike would not, a hotel lift/elevator, for example.

In Asia I stay in hostels/hotels.

[to be continued]
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Old 04-18-18, 07:55 PM
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I keep it simple. Three bags. Two on the bike and one around my hips. 7kg in all, and even so i took too many clothes on the last tour.
Bag 1 - front dry-bag (Eiger, inexpensive Indonesian brand, 20L) . Clothes & toiletries
Bag 2 - seatpost bag (Topeak 10L). Repair tools & spares; electronics charger and cables; and roadside snacks
Bag 3 - hip-belt bag on my person (Eiger, 5L). Cards, passport & money, plus powerbank and camera

Cellphone in my pocket or on the handlebars.



Originally Posted by FlippinFlags View Post
I've checked out your bike quite a few times, it's a beauty. What was your first touring bicycle? How often do you take advantage of folding? Where do you typically stay? Do you use transportation at all, or just bike? How minimal do you pack when touring? What bike bags do you use?

Thanks!
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Old 04-18-18, 07:59 PM
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living in this part of the world as well, have toured extensively in the countries
you mentioned over the past dozen years.

i do no camping here, not when i can typically find a guesthouse for $10-15
a night, cheaper if you don't need hot showers and AC and satellite TV.
daily budget (excluding airfare and visas) is under $25/day.
makes a big difference packing 20 pounds of gear vs. 40 pounds.

don't absolutely need a folder. full-size bikes easily fit in the bays underneath
coaches, train baggage cars, strapped to racks atop local buses.

be careful with your bike choice as this will be your first time carrying stuff.
a heavy load in the hills against the wind will destroy your knees if you don't
have suitable gearing.

i'm planning on taking the thai train this weekend...no baggage car, load bike into
end of passenger car. booked a $10 guesthouse on agoda, will be doing 3-4 days
of local rides near cambodia. (last month's trip cancelled for multiple reasons!)
you could combine train/bus travel to selected cities, stay in a guesthouse 4-5
nights, and do local loops to minimize stuff carried during most of your riding.

keep photocopies of your passport and some emergency cash separate from the
rest of your valuables.

if starting in singapore, take the subway (cannot bike from airport) into town,
stay at "tree in lodge" (close to subway stop). manager is a cycle tourist, has
loads of info. and bikers get a 50% discount.

heading out, a short ride thru parks along the coast, around the airport, will get
you to a small ferry terminal, 45-minute cruise to malaysia.

https://www.treeinlodge.com/
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Old 04-18-18, 10:03 PM
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Originally Posted by FlippinFlags View Post

Cheap gear meaning $150 helmet..
Whoa! Get last year’s model from Nashbar for a tenth of that!!
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Old 04-19-18, 06:49 PM
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Had to wait 24 hours to reply as my account is new..

What made you decide to go with the Dash style vs the other Dahon styles?

What made you decide to go front rack vs rear rack?

What type of straps are those that secure your dry bag to the front rack?

I bought a Dahon Mariner D8 as a "starter bike" and trying to figure out how to load my gear on the bike when I get it..

Thanks!

[QUOTE=Abu Mahendra;20293105]I keep it simple. Three bags. Two on the bike and one around my hips. 7kg in all, and even so i took too many clothes on the last tour.
Bag 1 - front dry-bag (Eiger, inexpensive Indonesian brand, 20L) . Clothes & toiletries
Bag 2 - seatpost bag (Topeak 10L). Repair tools & spares; electronics charger and cables; and roadside snacks
Bag 3 - hip-belt bag on my person (Eiger, 5L). Cards, passport & money, plus powerbank and camera

Cellphone in my pocket or on the handlebars.
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Old 04-19-18, 07:03 PM
  #16  
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I got the Dash on the suggestion of my bro-in-law who is a bike nut too. I was shipping out on oveaseas assignment so a folder was an obvious choice. That was 2014, and I knew nothing about folders. 'knowing nothing' also meant no preconceived notions or prejudice against folders so that helped.

For various reasons, including aesthetics, I prefer bikes with 'classic' geometry. After getting the Dash, I custom built a Dash Altena which, like the Dash, also folds via LockJaw hinges.


Now, having said that, I also have a FSIR Spin 5.0 which I hope to make my folding tourer. It folds smaller and quicker than the Dash. Rather than using a hinge, it uses an ingenious pivot rather than hinge...




These FSIRs are sold in North America under the brand of Solorock. I'd look to one of them before a middle hinge rig.

[to be continued]

[QUOTE=FlippinFlags;20295135]Had to wait 24 hours to reply as my account is new..

What made you decide to go with the Dash style vs the other Dahon styles?

What made you decide to go front rack vs rear rack?

What type of straps are those that secure your dry bag to the front rack?

I bought a Dahon Mariner D8 as a "starter bike" and trying to figure out how to load my gear on the bike when I get it..

Thanks!

Originally Posted by Abu Mahendra View Post
I keep it simple. Three bags. Two on the bike and one around my hips. 7kg in all, and even so i took too many clothes on the last tour.
Bag 1 - front dry-bag (Eiger, inexpensive Indonesian brand, 20L) . Clothes & toiletries
Bag 2 - seatpost bag (Topeak 10L). Repair tools & spares; electronics charger and cables; and roadside snacks
Bag 3 - hip-belt bag on my person (Eiger, 5L). Cards, passport & money, plus powerbank and camera

Cellphone in my pocket or on the handlebars.

Last edited by Abu Mahendra; 04-19-18 at 07:34 PM.
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Old 04-19-18, 07:28 PM
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Most Dahons and others come with a carrier block on the head tube. It supports no more than 7kg, but, being on the head tube, it does not directly impact steering. To the carrier block one can install a Tern Luggage Truss, and onto that, a Tern Kanga Rack. Easy, elegant, simple. The Kanga Rack comes with its own straps and mounts/dismounts the Luggage Truss easily via a Klickfix mount. You can mount anything with a Klickfix mount on the Luggage Truss.

The ethos is simple and fast, so I wanted to avoid traditional racks and panniers altogether.


[QUOTE=FlippinFlags;20295135]...

What made you decide to go front rack vs rear rack?

What type of straps are those that secure your dry bag to the front rack?

I bought a Dahon Mariner D8 as a "starter bike" and trying to figure out how to load my gear on the bike when I get it..

Thanks!

Originally Posted by Abu Mahendra View Post
I keep it simple. Three bags. Two on the bike and one around my hips. 7kg in all, and even so i took too many clothes on the last tour.
Bag 1 - front dry-bag (Eiger, inexpensive Indonesian brand, 20L) . Clothes & toiletries
Bag 2 - seatpost bag (Topeak 10L). Repair tools & spares; electronics charger and cables; and roadside snacks
Bag 3 - hip-belt bag on my person (Eiger, 5L). Cards, passport & money, plus powerbank and camera

Cellphone in my pocket or on the handlebars.
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Old 04-19-18, 07:47 PM
  #18  
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Gearing

You should look closely at your gearing. I would reconmend no higher than 25 gear-inches on the bottom end. Also, pay attention to RD ground clearance. 20" (406) wheels put the RD close to the ground, less of an issue on 451 wheels. This means that you are limited to short- (SS) and middle-cage (GS). A top recommendation is the Shimano Zee RD which is designed to sit high.

Shimano Zee RD on 406 wheels with 42-406 tires & 11-36T cogset


You want the FR-spec, not the DH-spec, Zee RD. The latter takes no more than a 34T cog. I'd recommend a 47T crank with an 11-36T cogset (i've used the Shimano SLX HG81 part for four years without complaints, but there's also XT M771 part which is lighter). The above drivetrain will give you a very serviceable touring gearing range of about 25-83 gear-inches. Litepro sells good single 47T chainrings.

Some Dahons come with heavy square-taper bottom brackets. You may wish to go with a lighter Hollotech job.

Finally, you want Shimano. SRAM is available in SEAsia but is much less common, and much more expensive than SRAM. Shimano.


[QUOTE=FlippinFlags;20295135]Had to wait 24 hours to reply as my account is new..

What made you decide to go with the Dash style vs the other Dahon styles?

What made you decide to go front rack vs rear rack?

What type of straps are those that secure your dry bag to the front rack?

I bought a Dahon Mariner D8 as a "starter bike" and trying to figure out how to load my gear on the bike when I get it..

Thanks!

Originally Posted by Abu Mahendra View Post
I keep it simple. Three bags. Two on the bike and one around my hips. 7kg in all, and even so i took too many clothes on the last tour.
Bag 1 - front dry-bag (Eiger, inexpensive Indonesian brand, 20L) . Clothes & toiletries
Bag 2 - seatpost bag (Topeak 10L). Repair tools & spares; electronics charger and cables; and roadside snacks
Bag 3 - hip-belt bag on my person (Eiger, 5L). Cards, passport & money, plus powerbank and camera

Cellphone in my pocket or on the handlebars.

Last edited by Abu Mahendra; 04-19-18 at 07:53 PM.
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Old 04-20-18, 08:34 AM
  #19  
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I would like to stay in hostels and guest houses but don't really want to spend more than $5 if I can help it.. if this was a month trip it wouldn't be a big deal but I will be traveling for probably the next 3 years years (not all on bike) so every dollar ads up over time..

Thanks for the tip on the Singapore Tree In Lodge, I looked them up, but where do you book? I see them listed on some hostel websites but don't see how you get the discount?

I'd like to stay there as it's off the main areas and at a 50% discount it's a great deal.. any idea if they will still let me get the discount even if I'm just starting my tour there?

Is cycling from the airpot 100% banned or something?

[QUOTE=saddlesores;20293109]living in this part of the world as well, have toured extensively in the countries
you mentioned over the past dozen years.

i do no camping here, not when i can typically find a guesthouse for $10-15
a night, cheaper if you don't need hot showers and AC and satellite TV.
daily budget (excluding airfare and visas) is under $25/day.
makes a big difference packing 20 pounds of gear vs. 40 pounds.

don't absolutely need a folder. full-size bikes easily fit in the bays underneath
coaches, train baggage cars, strapped to racks atop local buses.

be careful with your bike choice as this will be your first time carrying stuff.
a heavy load in the hills against the wind will destroy your knees if you don't
have suitable gearing.

i'm planning on taking the thai train this weekend...no baggage car, load bike into
end of passenger car. booked a $10 guesthouse on agoda, will be doing 3-4 days
of local rides near cambodia. (last month's trip cancelled for multiple reasons!)
you could combine train/bus travel to selected cities, stay in a guesthouse 4-5
nights, and do local loops to minimize stuff carried during most of your riding.

keep photocopies of your passport and some emergency cash separate from the
rest of your valuables.

if starting in singapore, take the subway (cannot bike from airport) into town,
stay at "tree in lodge" (close to subway stop). manager is a cycle tourist, has
loads of info. and bikers get a 50% discount.

heading out, a short ride thru parks along the coast, around the airport, will get
you to a small ferry terminal, 45-minute cruise to malaysia.
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Old 04-20-18, 08:39 AM
  #20  
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I ended up buying a Dahon Mariner D8 as my "starter bike" .. I know it's not ideal, especially as far as gear inches: 34" - 92".. but it's not terrible so we'll see. Ideally I'd like to be 20"-120".. but that's down the road.. unless someone knows of a Dahon Speed Pro TT available for sale?





[QUOTE=Abu Mahendra;20295249]You should look closely at your gearing. I would reconmend no higher than 25 gear-inches on the bottom end. Also, pay attention to RD ground clearance. 20" (406) wheels put the RD close to the ground, less of an issue on 451 wheels. This means that you are limited to short- (SS) and middle-cage (GS). A top recommendation is the Shimano Zee RD which is designed to sit high.

Shimano Zee RD on 406 wheels with 42-406 tires & 11-36T cogset

You want the FR-spec, not the DH-spec, Zee RD. The latter takes no more than a 34T cog. I'd recommend a 47T crank with an 11-36T cogset (i've used the Shimano SLX HG81 part for four years without complaints, but there's also XT M771 part which is lighter). The above drivetrain will give you a very serviceable touring gearing range of about 25-83 gear-inches. Litepro sells good single 47T chainrings.

Some Dahons come with heavy square-taper bottom brackets. You may wish to go with a lighter Hollotech job.

Finally, you want Shimano. SRAM is available in SEAsia but is much less common, and much more expensive than SRAM. Shimano.


Originally Posted by FlippinFlags View Post
Had to wait 24 hours to reply as my account is new..

What made you decide to go with the Dash style vs the other Dahon styles?

What made you decide to go front rack vs rear rack?

What type of straps are those that secure your dry bag to the front rack?

I bought a Dahon Mariner D8 as a "starter bike" and trying to figure out how to load my gear on the bike when I get it..

Thanks!
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Old 04-20-18, 09:11 AM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by FlippinFlags View Post
I would like to stay in hostels and guest houses but don't really want to spend more than $5 if I can help it..

you can meet that price point in laos and parts of cambodia.
possibly at truckstop hovels in desolate parts of china.

Thanks for the tip on the Singapore Tree In Lodge, I looked them up, but where do you book? I see them listed on some hostel websites but don't see how you get the discount?

you'll find details on the "how much" page. cyclists get 1/2 off the $20/night charge.
the "contact info" page has a reservation form. say "i be biker" in the comments section.

.....Is cycling from the airpot 100% banned or something?

only access is freeway, no bikes. not sure if they allow bike boxes on the subways still.
new rules came in, i think you can take folders on subway and bus. taxi not too expensive.


.
there is (was) a shop selling packing materials, tape, twine in the lower floor of the same
building.

plenty of good eats nearby.

money changers with good rates in a mall area a few blocks away.

the ferry to penerang malaysia is located on the north side of the airport.
there is an immigration office at the terminal.
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Old 04-20-18, 12:04 PM
  #22  
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I've toured in SE Asia 3 times, and like others have said, leave your camping (and cooking) gear at home. I've only met one couple who was touring who camped, and they didn't do it all the time. The climate is not conducive to camping and accommodations are cheap outside of Singapore. If you need to stay home and save up some more money, I'd urge you to do that. I met plenty of touring cyclists who sent their camping gear home, including one guy who had biked overland from Italy to Laos via China. He used his camping gear until he got to Laos. And if you decide to stealth camp in NE Malaysia, you might think twice when you see all of the dead snakes on the road there.

The last 2 of my tours in SE Asia were on my folding Bike Friday. There was one time when I needed to fold it to get on a Thai bus, but all of the other times, I didn't need to do anything to get it on public transport.

Delicious and inexpensive food is available at night markets throughout SE Asia. It's one of the joys of travel there. Cooking your own won't save you any money there.
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Old 04-20-18, 12:23 PM
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have you taken a good number of local overnights , tried out all your gear and packing methods..?
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Old 04-20-18, 12:59 PM
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23" frame mtb loaded into thai rail baggage car and
underneath "green bus" coach. turn the bars, no need
to remove front wheel.
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Old 04-20-18, 05:27 PM
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Cheap eats at Singapore's Changi Airport

Head to the airport employee canteen which is in reality an underground food court. You'll pay non-staff prices, but you'll have greater variety and lower prices than the traveller options in the terminals themselves.

$5/nite accomodation? You won't get anything where I live in Bali for that little. Day in and day out, $5/nite accomodation is going to grind you down. SEAsia is not as cheap as it used to be. Been here 17 years to know....

20-120 gear inches? I've got a 20" (406) wheelset with SRAM DualDrive offering that kibd of range for sale here in Bali. The front wheel is 74mm OLD (read, Dahon folder OLD).

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