Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Popping my touring cherry

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Popping my touring cherry

Old 06-07-18, 09:12 AM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
intransit1217's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Kenosha , Wi
Posts: 1,231

Bikes: 2 Masi giramondo

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 46 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Popping my touring cherry

Soooo finally the moment has arrived. I'm packing for an overnighter (160 miles rt). I'll be laden with about 40 lbs of gear, my bike weighs 35, and I weigh 247 as of this morning.
Currently, the weather says slight rain saturday am with e/ne winds at 10-15. It will be a headwind. Go big or go home, right?

How does one calculate food for caloric burn? I'm predicting 3500-4000 cal burn a day. A standard soup can of beef stew is good for 1 hour. That's too heavy to carry. Cup o noodles are half that but practically weightless by comparison. Oddly, a two pack of fig newtons is 200 cal. Good return on compact size.

Any math tips on this?

Thanks kids!
intransit1217 is offline  
Old 06-07-18, 09:23 AM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Left Coast, Canada
Posts: 5,126
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2236 Post(s)
Liked 1,314 Times in 707 Posts
"Take the cannoli, leave the gun"

I would choose calorie dense but nutritious foods, such as fig newtons, bananas, clif bars, almonds etc... not candy bars. You are not racing. What you may find is 40lb's of gear may make your effort harder so a reduction there will equal less fuel required overall but a overnighter is a good starting point to begin sorting those things out.

I would avoid anything like a can or food you need to prepare for fuel while on the road. You will tend to want to avoid stopping to deal with it and thus put off eating until you bonk. Then you have to play catch up energy wise.

Mathwise, I have read your gut can only absorb something like 300cal/hour so eating more than that is a waste.

Good luck!.
Happy Feet is offline  
Old 06-07-18, 09:49 AM
  #3  
Full Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: No certain place. Catch me when you can.
Posts: 384

Bikes: I'm not a guy - brand doesn't matter.

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 184 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
The title of this post is so utterly... D*ckheaded. If you can't remember that this forum is for all genders, perhaps you could move on.
travelinhobo is offline  
Old 06-07-18, 10:15 AM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Left Coast, Canada
Posts: 5,126
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2236 Post(s)
Liked 1,314 Times in 707 Posts
Funny, I did not read that as either offensive or gender specific. Sexually it is used to refer to both men or women losing their virginity but more generally denotes a first time for many activities. I think you over reacted and cranked the amp to 11 there.
Happy Feet is offline  
Old 06-07-18, 11:07 AM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
PedalingWalrus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Maine, USA
Posts: 1,612

Bikes: Corvid Sojourner, Surly Ice Cream Truck, Co-Motion Divide, Co-Motion Java Tandem, Salsa Warbird, Salsa Beargrease, Carver Tandem

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 533 Post(s)
Liked 435 Times in 227 Posts
agreed

Originally Posted by travelinhobo
The title of this post is so utterly... D*ckheaded. If you can't remember that this forum is for all genders, perhaps you could move on.
PedalingWalrus is offline  
Old 06-07-18, 11:36 AM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: North of Boston
Posts: 5,721

Bikes: Kona Dawg, Surly 1x1, Karate Monkey, Rockhopper, Crosscheck , Burley Runabout,

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 854 Post(s)
Liked 111 Times in 66 Posts
Seems like a lot for 1 night. Resupply options for food and water? Take enough clothes so you are warm and dry. I like dried figs and dry salami. Cooking? Tent/shelter set up? 80 times 2 seems a lot for me. I'm more of a 50-70 miles per day. Try pedaling with your full load for an hour and up a hill. Got low enough gears, load secure? As to food? Eat before you get hungry,I like a small bar bag with snacks. Dried fruit, peanut m&ms etc.
Leebo is offline  
Old 06-07-18, 11:57 AM
  #7  
Occam's Rotor
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 7,248
Mentioned: 61 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2366 Post(s)
Liked 2,331 Times in 1,164 Posts
Originally Posted by Happy Feet
gender specific. Sexually it is used to refer to both men or women losing their virginity
Someone needs an anatomy lesson.
Cyclist0108 is offline  
Old 06-07-18, 01:10 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
intransit1217's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Kenosha , Wi
Posts: 1,231

Bikes: 2 Masi giramondo

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 46 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
To those who were offended by my verbiage, My apologies. However, simple notation will do the trick. No need to resort to sexism to prove a point with me. Now you know.

To the others, Thank you! 300 cal/hr seems reasonable. I'm probably overpacked a bit but I expect a learning curve here so, again, thank you
intransit1217 is offline  
Old 06-07-18, 02:07 PM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Left Coast, Canada
Posts: 5,126
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2236 Post(s)
Liked 1,314 Times in 707 Posts
Don't let an initial reaction get you down. Good luck with the tour and let us know what you experience and/or learn.

Originally Posted by wgscott
Someone needs an anatomy lesson.
If you are taking a very literal interpretation perhaps.. but even then the expression is a poor descriptor of the event to start with. In any case, I have heard it used to describe the experience for both sexes informally.
Figuratively speaking, in the colloquial sense as was the intended case here, it simply refers to the first time for a new activity.
I don't believe in berating someone with excessive moral indignation for saying something if there was no actual negative intention. At some point that in itself becomes offensive.

Last edited by Happy Feet; 06-07-18 at 02:21 PM.
Happy Feet is offline  
Old 06-07-18, 02:33 PM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 3,473
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 363 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 22 Posts
I agree the title of the thread was a bit lacking in taste and we should keep the forum pretty unoffensive, but live and learn. Now he knows.

As for the question, damn thatís a lot of weight. Like, heading into Africa for a week with no oportunity to resupply type weight. Overnighter, you say? Sounds like a 15-20lb trip to me, if taking some luxury items. Being a bigger guy, you may well be able to haul that weight around more easily than many, but why do it? What does your gear list look like? Also, do you normally put down 100mi days back-to-back? Becauee two 80mi days with a load like that is Easily equivalent.

As for what to eat, get some high protien snacks and let the calories take care of themselves. Jerky, hard boiled eggs, hard cheeses? A good way to go is to look into backpacking food. Lots of touring and backpacking things overlap. Unless that 240lbs is all muscle, I kinda doubt you need 4,000 calories a day anyway. Maybe I eat that much on tour and just donít realize it, but I donít think so.

Last edited by 3speed; 06-07-18 at 03:51 PM.
3speed is offline  
Old 06-07-18, 04:41 PM
  #11  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 4,440
Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 863 Post(s)
Liked 234 Times in 136 Posts
I have never camped and prepared my own food on a tour, but I can tell you from my experiences doing credit card/hotel tours that I never feel like eating as much at the end of a day riding as I do at the end of a day sitting. I used to bring all kinds of "health bars" and sports drinks on the road with me and then end up eating them as snacks when I got home. Something about ten hours on a saddle, focused totally on the moment, pushes food way down on my priority list.

Again, I'm no expert, but perhaps you might want to calculate what you think you should bring - and then cut it in half?
Papa Tom is offline  
Old 06-07-18, 04:52 PM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: NW Pa.
Posts: 241

Bikes: 2018 Specialized Sirrus, 2016 Surly Disc Trucker, 800 MTB for winter use

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 101 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Last year was my first overnight tour. If my memory serves me correctly my gear weighed in at 47#. My bike handled horribly. The next trip weighed in at much less. You'll only know what you need until you get out there and give it a go. For me a 160 mile trip in two days would be very aggressive indeed. Even now with more experience and better conditioning I'd only be comfortable with 60 miles a day.

As far as food I carry the freeze dried stuff you get from a market...but for the most part I try to hit restaurants for my meals. I don't count calories...I eat til I'm full.

Sorry I wasn't more help.
mattbur is offline  
Old 06-07-18, 07:40 PM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 720

Bikes: Road, mountain and track bikes and tandems.

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 282 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 18 Times in 15 Posts
To keep up on a hydration schedule, I try to drink about a bottle an hour of water. I tend to not eat a lot because of keeping up with hydration schedule. I can't imagine eating 300 calories an hour. I have ridden a few times to a town that is 80 miles down the road from here, for an over-nighter and don't consume more than a few food bars. (while riding) Hydration should your 1st priority/ concern. hunger will dictate. Since it sounds like you have done this ride before, do you really use all of the stuff that you take. Somehow I do use most of my stuff, but it does not add up to what your taking. What If you go through and make a pile of stuff unused from the last time and leave that pile at home. Obviously not your tool kit/ spare tubes etc.. but you know...extra.
Brian25 is offline  
Old 06-07-18, 09:11 PM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Left Coast, Canada
Posts: 5,126
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2236 Post(s)
Liked 1,314 Times in 707 Posts
The 300cal/hr is only a rough guide to sustained effort beyond the initial depletion of glycogen stores in the muscle tissue. Of course one can go out and ride 80 miles and eat nothing at all during the ride itself and survive intact but there will be a long recovery phase of low energy wherein the body replenishes glycogen (usually overnight). Often you may feel bagged the next day or two. If one wanted to ride high mileage over a long period of time you can't really do that without bonking a lot so one should try to "replenish" energy on the road as you use it, thus consuming about 300cal of easily digested food/hour. Consider that that would replace traditional large meal breaks and it doesn't seem too bad.

At the same time, if one is adapted to only burning carbs and sugars for energy as with a steady high carb/junk food diet, the body will be less adapted to transforming body fat to energy and the bonk from not eating (when glycogen stores are used up) will be more pronounced.

A good plan would be to create a timeline map of your expected ride and the amount of food you plan to consume and when. Then you have graphic representation of reality vs perceived requirements and will know what you need to bring and when to eat it. For an eight hour ride it might look like this:

8am: Breakfast You have a store of glycogen already from the night so you can stretch the next feed time out longer)
10am: 300cal
11am: 300cal
12-1pm: lunch (again with some rest and a larger meal you can stretch the next feed time out)
3pm: 300cal
4pm: 300cal
5pm finish

So you have 4 300cal snacks and meals. Snacks could be 1 clif bar, 1 banana, 2-3 fig newtons and 1 bag of almonds. Not a crazy amount to either carry or consume during a day.

Last edited by Happy Feet; 06-07-18 at 09:16 PM.
Happy Feet is offline  
Old 06-08-18, 12:04 PM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
boomhauer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 782
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 226 Post(s)
Liked 45 Times in 32 Posts
Originally Posted by intransit1217
. I'll be laden with about 40 lbs of gear,

!
If this includes that 4 liters of water you think you need, may I suggest cutting that amount in half? Water is readily available in most places. No real reason to haul extra weight.
boomhauer is offline  
Old 06-08-18, 08:11 PM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4,452
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1737 Post(s)
Liked 1,368 Times in 717 Posts
Back in 76 my friend Pete and I got the touring bug and went on a week long ride along the shores of Lake Michigan. Food? We brought cans of Spaghettios, baked beans, beef jerkey, nuts, and stopped at farm stands and small stores for fruits. We had stoves, but most of the time we ate everything cold. We figured 50lbs was OK, and it was summer so who needed lots of clothing? Back then we rode in cut off shorts and skivvies, washed them \ at the end of the day with a swim in the lake and let them dry on the bike the next day. It was simply the best time of our lives and we toured many times after that, including the Natchez Trace Parkway, using the same formula.
Keep it simple and enjoy the heck out of the adventure!
TiHabanero is offline  
Old 06-08-18, 09:07 PM
  #17  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
intransit1217's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Kenosha , Wi
Posts: 1,231

Bikes: 2 Masi giramondo

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 46 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Well it blew up and my packing is all over the foyer now.

If you are a mod and reading this, ho ahead and lock me out. Iím done.

thx
intransit1217 is offline  
Old 06-08-18, 09:15 PM
  #18  
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Left Coast, Canada
Posts: 5,126
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2236 Post(s)
Liked 1,314 Times in 707 Posts
What blew up?
Happy Feet is offline  
Old 06-11-18, 10:33 AM
  #19  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
intransit1217's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Kenosha , Wi
Posts: 1,231

Bikes: 2 Masi giramondo

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 46 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by Happy Feet
What blew up?
My gear. I dumped it all out, tried to repack, got frustrated, gave up, went to bed. Woke up with fresh ideas, tried to trim, got the 60/40, packed, and headed out.

I'm compiling the story now. Thanks for your support!
intransit1217 is offline  
Old 06-11-18, 12:25 PM
  #20  
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Left Coast, Canada
Posts: 5,126
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2236 Post(s)
Liked 1,314 Times in 707 Posts
Ha ha! I hear you. When I prep for a trip some part of my house always gets taken over for a while as I sort and pack. It's all part of the process. One thing I do now is make lists and do a lot of pre trip sorting on paper first but still...
Happy Feet is offline  
Old 06-11-18, 01:03 PM
  #21  
Full Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 334
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 121 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by travelinhobo
The title of this post is so utterly... D*ckheaded. If you can't remember that this forum is for all genders, perhaps you could move on.
really ? thin-skinned, are you ? perhaps you might reply to the subject of the post,if you're going to reply at all.

on that note, low-glycemic foods are best for endurance activity. another posted that 300 cals/hour max is about all an average adult can handle. i would concur with this suggestion. my touring favorites are granola bars, bagels with peanut butter, trail mix.
adablduya is offline  
Old 06-20-18, 07:07 PM
  #22  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
intransit1217's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Kenosha , Wi
Posts: 1,231

Bikes: 2 Masi giramondo

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 46 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
RIDE REPORT



Preliminaries



I was invited by a fellow rider to do a weekend overnight trip from the Kenosha Racine area up to Milwaukee and out to Naga-waukee campground one week ahead of the trip. My scheduled said yes so I began gathering things I needed. This ride is put on yearly by Coast in bikes in Milwaukee as an introduction to bike touring, which is perfect for me since I’d been wanting to do this since I was little. I had the bike, racks, and panniers but knew little about loading, and quickly found myself swamped with decisions on what to take and what not to. There was a continental breakfast supplied by the hosts of the ride and a pizza order put in at the campground. Since I didn’t know the best plan for fueling this trip, I over packed. Ironically, the night before departure my bags were re-strewn across the foyer in a last ditch attempt to lose some things. Frustrated, I gave up and went to bed. I woke up the next morning with new ideas on packing and trimmed one measly pound. Now that I know better, I could trim ten probably. But I have low-end camping things that tend to be heavy and bulky. And since I was expecting rain, that added more baggage over all. Weird things like using motorcycle rain pants to stuff my tent into and el-cheapo rain pants for my sleeping bag. Thankfully, the ride out was minimal rain and decent weather. The return trip, sucked. I had to call my spouse to pick me up because it was a downpour and my rain jacket failed so badly it cost me my phone. Let’s break it down.



The ride out.

Finally packed, loaded 60/40 to the front, raingear on, I started out both excited and wary. I was looking at about 70 miles one way loaded down to about 320 lbs. Bike, gear, rider, and 2 big full bottles of fluid. There was a mild rain which abated quickly so when I got to my riding partners house, I found myself dropping layers. Note: Underlayer shirts are awesome. Just enough to keep you warm, just enough to keep the airflow going. And off we went taking one street that pretty much was in-line with the bike shop. I had about 32 miles at that point. Amazingly, even loaded down, a touring bike will move out. It just takes a bit longer to get going but frequently I found myself in my groove doing 14-16. Not always, of course. And steep grades are a bear. Long 1% grades were the worst. But even those don’t last forever and what goes up must come down. Note: Good brakes are a MUST on a touring bike.

We left his house at about 7 and were easily at the bike shop around 9. Plenty of time for a recovery, some food, a quick last bike check, and some getting to know people. The starting group was 7 strong, with one just using it as a day trip. We pulled out of the bike shop about 10:30 and had a nice casual pace most of the way. The group shuffled around, stretched out, bunched up and no one got dropped. I did find myself working a bit to catch up after one last shirt swap, but they slowed enough for me to catch them. Plenty of stops with lights, crossings, and a lunch break just before camp. I was surprised that I still felt decent.
Note: I think fueling is the key. I carb loaded the night before, had oatmeal and an orange the morning of, second breakfast at the shop, which carried me out to the lunch stop easily. When there, I checked on the dinner situation they suggested I cover myself for a couple more hours. So I fueled again! Five miles later, we rolled into the campground and down to a group site which was huge and grassy. Easily enough room for twenty or more cyclists and we were only 6. 20 minutes later, 6 shelters were in place. I’m surprised no one brought a hammock tent. But the trees were too far apart anyway. Our hosts were riding bikes that looked like hack to the naked eye. One was actually a Soma wolverine and the other an older Surly travelers check. A Trek fx, a Pugsly single speed rolling 29r plus tires pulling a bob, my Masi, and a Bob Jackson rounded out the group. We all settled in, began to chat and the beer began to appear. Apparently the Pugsly brought only a tent and a case of Leinenkugel summer shandy. The bob Jackson rider brought a sixer of Stella. The wolverine brought box wine. After 64.5 loaded miles, I allowed myself a Stella. No one stretched which I found odd. I didn’t either, fully expecting to feel lousy the next day. Other than not getting enough sleep from too much humidity, a lousy sleeping pad, and hosts that were up until 1 am drinking, I felt decent. I also turned in 9:30 ish. Note: Know your crowd before you go. Also, know the food situation so you don’t pack unnecessarily.



Day 2

I knew rain was coming in and I expected to be absolutely soaked by sun up but my cheap wal-mart tent with rain-fly kept the interior dry enough to buy me time to break camp in the lulls. I was up first, broke camp, and boogied by 7 am before I saw any heads. I worried this was bad form but I’m an early to bed early to rise guy so I’m not going to lie there while the situation worsens. I went back to the place we lunched because I knew it would be open for breakfast. When I arrived, I was soaked. My performance borough jacket had lost the war against the downpour and I had water in my pockets. My phone got wet and killed the camera. About thirty minutes later, a fellow camper arrived who grabbed a snack and a coffee and we rode another 18 miles in the on-off rain back towards Milwaukee. I had called my wife to pick me up because motorists are bad enough in the dry and there was going to be some road ways in the return trip. I opted for safety. My partner continued with about ten to go and I threw my things in the car and went home.



What worked

The Masi was great. Perfect gearing, only once did I need the small ring, and it didn’t shift. So I stalled and had to walk up the short steep grade. And she had a low speed wobble/ shimmy. Possibly doesn’t like 60/40 loading. Otherwise comfy and rock solid on the downgrades. A little flexy, but not disturbingly so.



New tires! I didn’t want to spend 75 each on a new set of clement mso’s so I opted for 45$ Bontrager H5s in a 700x38. They came with reflective sidewalls, bonus! A bit heavy and slow rolling but thicker sidewalls and tread area. Lightly siped center, knobby-ish edges. Cushy and durable! I have yet to buy a bad bontrager tire.



O2 calhoun pants! Fought the rain, and won. Standard issue body moisture inside. Another happy surprise.







35$ Walmart tent. This was a surprise. Ordered by mail and not expecting much, it was easy to set up, had great ventilation and the rainfly actually worked! I thought for sure I would awaken soaked and have to carry 15lbs of rain home in my gear. Didn’t happen. My 4$ tarp helped ward off the groundwater giving me enough time to pack when the rain slowed.



My Axiom panniers worked well for their design. The larger non water proof I put on the back to carry tent and sleeping gear as it was all bagged in plastic. The fronts were smaller waterproof units that had my food on one side and clothing on the other, which were also in plastic as I know nothing is 100% waterproof.



Mycharge adventure: A charging brick I bought at best buy for 35$. I easily got two full charges on my phone out of it. Compact, water resistant, not too heavy. Another good value, and happy surprise.



What didn’t work.

Overpacking. If going on your first trip, learn EVERYTHING you can about it. Food availability, weather issues, type of riders if going with a group. Buy the lightest sleeping things you can afford. And pants. Pants pants pants. And by pants I mean some kind of utilitarian cycling pants. Those with mtb shorts or light canvas type biking gear, carried less and didn’t have to worry about durability. I had to pamper my lycra stuff. Therefore I had to carry street clothes. Oy! Dual purpose stuff is king here.

Performance borough rain jacket: FAIL. Windbreak, light or medium temporary rain, fine. Can’t do a monsoon.

Axiom front pannier racks. Not a complete fail, but not designed for adventure type forks. Had no tie-strut, and mounting them was kooky. So they kind of had a slight wobble.

Overall, a really good shakedown ride. I would do it again and definitely go longer. With luck, I’ll set out to my dads place Michigan sometime in the future. That will be about 700 rt and I will likely do motels. But with better gear, tenting is not out of the question. For those who have been thinking about it, make it happen
intransit1217 is offline  
Old 06-20-18, 07:33 PM
  #23  
Tourer
 
SparkyBeacon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 68

Bikes: Birdy folder, Bike Friday, Burley tandem, Nishiki fixie conversion, Dahon "Coca-Cola" Speed P8

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Congrats

Congrats on doing your first tour. Thanks for the ride report. It is a good read and gives everyone things to think about. I think you are now qualified to dispense touring advice.
SparkyBeacon is offline  
Old 06-21-18, 03:04 AM
  #24  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 1,174
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 381 Post(s)
Liked 145 Times in 93 Posts
poor choice of a thread title.
BikeLite is offline  
Old 06-21-18, 05:46 AM
  #25  
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 39,187
Mentioned: 211 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18389 Post(s)
Liked 15,455 Times in 7,301 Posts
Originally Posted by Happy Feet
"Take the cannoli, leave the gun"
You got it backwards. The line is: "Leave the gun, take the cannoli."--Peter Clemenza
indyfabz is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.