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Complete Newbie, stove question.

Old 06-19-18, 03:37 PM
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dhri
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Complete Newbie, stove question.

HI all,

I am a complete newbie to bike touring and this is my first post. Apologies if its in the wrong place, or has been answered to death (I have looked, but couldn't find n answer) Putting together a tour from Mexico down to Columbia with myself and two others. Just a bit stumped over choice of a stove, we'll be off the beaten track (camping) so need something to cook over, and when a campfire isn't possible we'll obviously need a stove. Disposable canisters are a no go because can't guarantee that they will be available, and would rather not be using gasoline to cook over either. I was wondering though if there exist a way to connect a normal propane cylinder to a propane stove, all be it a very small one 1-3lbs. Every small town in Central America runs off bottled gas, so refills wouldn't be a problem. But can't seem to find a way of doing it.

Anybody out there know what I'm talking about?

cheers
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Old 06-19-18, 04:39 PM
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Consider instead an Alcohol stove.. you can make one yourself out of a couple drinks cans.

internet has DIY how to.. and fuel alcohol should not be hard to find ...

151 proof rum burns well too..
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Old 06-19-18, 04:44 PM
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Originally Posted by dhri View Post
I am a ...
MSR makes stoves which burn multiple fuels (gasoline/diesel/kerosene/coleman/jet/canister); International, Universal, Dragonfly and XGK, in order of fuel flexibility:

https://www.rei.com/c/stoves
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Old 06-19-18, 04:50 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Consider instead an Alcohol stove.. you can make one yourself out of a couple drinks cans.

internet has DIY how to.. and fuel alcohol should not be hard to find ...

151 proof rum burns well too..

Yeah, I think it will be an alcohol stove, just wondered if such a thing as a portable, refillable LP stove exists.

THankyou
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Old 06-19-18, 04:52 PM
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Originally Posted by seeker333 View Post
MSR makes stoves which burn multiple fuels (gasoline/diesel/kerosene/coleman/jet/canister); International, Universal, Dragonfly and XGK, in order of fuel flexibility:

Thankyou,
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Old 06-19-18, 04:53 PM
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Bound to be too heavy, any refillable LPG bottle.

Petrol stove does burn hotter , but an alcohol stove has no moving parts .
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Old 06-19-18, 05:37 PM
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I know thereís one that just screws onto the top of the green Coleman propane bottles. Itís a little bulkier and heavier than a backpacking stove, but when a backpacking stove isnít an option.... one of the multi-fuel stoves would be a good choice too. I think thatís what most people go with in situations like that.
https://www.amazon.com/Coleman-Bottl...mp+stove&psc=1
I think there might be one out there thatís a bit smaller, but a quick search brought this up.

Last edited by 3speed; 06-19-18 at 05:42 PM.
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Old 06-19-18, 06:38 PM
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BTW this topic is discussed fairly often:

https://lmgtfy.com/?q=stove+site%3Abi....net%2Ftouring
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Old 06-19-18, 09:48 PM
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+1 for the alcohol stove. I always brought my Pepsi G model with me while working in South America. Went to some extremely remote villages and was always able to get a fuel that worked well.
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Old 06-19-18, 11:38 PM
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alcohol stove. lightweight, can't break.
fuel readily available most everywhere.

something like this...

https://www.ebay.com/itm/TRANGIA-Ult...t/153066253755
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Old 06-20-18, 12:06 AM
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I was recently in my local REI and they had a relatively cheap (under $10.00?) adaptor that let's you refill a canister with propane. I think it was made by Jet Boil but it works with most/all cannister brands. There are also many "How to refill cannisters" videos on You Tube.

You might also be able to do what long distance/through hikers do. Ship cannisters to UPS or FedEx depots for pick-up in cities that you'll be passing through. You probably can't use postal mail for gas cannisters.

Last edited by MAK; 06-20-18 at 12:08 AM. Reason: Added info
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Old 06-20-18, 02:21 AM
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We currently use a Trangia multifuel X2, which burns everything from canister gas to white gas to petrol to diesel and I'm told it can also burn **** seed oil.
The only real downside to it is that the dirtier the fuel, the more cleaning it requireds. I haven't tried anything dirtier than white gas yet, but with both canister gas and white gas the stove cleans itself since it heats up enough to burn off any soot deposits. It actually started cleaning off the soot off of one of our trangia pots, which had a heavy layer of hardened soot created by a wood gas stove.
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Old 06-20-18, 05:15 AM
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It's all fun and games until you realize you can't fly with it and have to ditch it at the airport.

Originally Posted by seeker333 View Post
MSR makes stoves which burn multiple fuels (gasoline/diesel/kerosene/coleman/jet/canister); International, Universal, Dragonfly and XGK, in order of fuel flexibility:

https://www.rei.com/c/stoves
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Old 06-20-18, 06:16 AM
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I think you would have terrible luck finding refillable propane cylinders. If I was doing a trip like that I would use liquid fuel stoves.

My Optimus Nova theoretically runs on Coleman fuel or on kerosene without changing a jet, but I have found performance on kerosene is not that great, instead I have used a mix of one third Colman fuel and two thirds kerosene. I carried a separate small bottle of Coleman fuel to prime it with, that caused less soot.

My Primus Omnifuel also is rated to work with Coleman fuel or kerosene and I have found that to also work well with the one third Coleman + two thirds kerosene mix. The Omnifuel requires a jet change for those fuels, I used my mix with the kerosene jet. Primus says that the Omnifuel will work with diesel fuel. I tried it on diesel number 2 and it was a disaster, but it might run on diesel number 1 since diesel number 1 is much closer to kerosene.

I have not used an MSR multi-fuel stove, so I can't comment on them.

Regarding travel with the stove, some good info on flying with a stove here:
https://thesummitregister.com/flying...camping-stove/

I have heard of Pocket Rocket stoves being confiscated by TSA, I do not know if they were in a carryon or not but some stoves have sharp edges on the pot supports that TSA might deem to be a weapon.
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Old 06-20-18, 07:08 AM
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Not PocketRockets but Whisperlites - the flexible fuel canisters you fill with gasoline (or other compatible fuel) that you have to hand pump to create pressure have been confiscated by TSA for mere gasoline smell - first hand experience :-)



Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
I think you would have terrible luck finding refillable propane cylinders. If I was doing a trip like that I would use liquid fuel stoves.

My Optimus Nova theoretically runs on Coleman fuel or on kerosene without changing a jet, but I have found performance on kerosene is not that great, instead I have used a mix of one third Colman fuel and two thirds kerosene. I carried a separate small bottle of Coleman fuel to prime it with, that caused less soot.

My Primus Omnifuel also is rated to work with Coleman fuel or kerosene and I have found that to also work well with the one third Coleman + two thirds kerosene mix. The Omnifuel requires a jet change for those fuels, I used my mix with the kerosene jet. Primus says that the Omnifuel will work with diesel fuel. I tried it on diesel number 2 and it was a disaster, but it might run on diesel number 1 since diesel number 1 is much closer to kerosene.

I have not used an MSR multi-fuel stove, so I can't comment on them.

Regarding travel with the stove, some good info on flying with a stove here:
https://thesummitregister.com/flying...camping-stove/

I have heard of Pocket Rocket stoves being confiscated by TSA, I do not know if they were in a carryon or not but some stoves have sharp edges on the pot supports that TSA might deem to be a weapon.
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Old 06-20-18, 07:28 AM
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Of course you can fly with stoves. What's that about?? I always used the MSR Whisperlite Intl, but never liked it mainly because it doesn't simmer. Biked Venezuela in 99. Don't Remy what fuel they had, but since that was where the tour began, know fuel is available.
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Old 06-20-18, 07:39 AM
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On a completely side note, make sure you are keeping track of the travel alerts along that route. There are many places in Central and South America for a traveler to be waylaid. There is some indication on various tour blogs on CGOAB that indicate some of the police forces will escort or ride you through dangerous areas. It is also my understanding that occasionally these police forces ARE the danger.

Aside from that, it sounds terribly exciting. Write a blog so I can ride along.
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Old 06-20-18, 07:44 AM
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I switched from my Trangia to a Primus Omnifuel in Guatemala because I had a hard time finding appropriate alcohol for the Trangia in Mexico. I'm no expert though, perhaps something suitable was available and I just didn't know about it.

I've been running the Omnifuel on regular gasoline. Works fine, but much better on high octane stuff from a gas station than on the mystery gas from the drums in front of some dude's house. I cycled with a guy who was running an MSR Multifuel on gasoline also.

But at least in South America propane is used everywhere. If you can figure out a way to refill a canister, I imagine you'll be able to find the propane.
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Old 06-20-18, 08:14 AM
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Originally Posted by travelinhobo View Post
Of course you can fly with stoves. What's that about?? I always used the MSR Whisperlite Intl, but never liked it mainly because it doesn't simmer. Biked Venezuela in 99. Don't Remy what fuel they had, but since that was where the tour began, know fuel is available.
Yeah, youíd think so. But then you fly out to Costa Rica, through El Salvador with no problem. Then on the way back, no problem To El Salvador conecting flight, but in the short 30 minute flight change in the airport trying to come back to the US they take Anything they could possibly make up a story for being a threat, including your simple lighter, which it blatantly says is fine in the TSA rules. It all depends on what jackass you get checking you/your stuff out...
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Old 06-20-18, 08:33 AM
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Originally Posted by PedalingWalrus View Post
Not PocketRockets but Whisperlites - the flexible fuel canisters you fill with gasoline (or other compatible fuel) that you have to hand pump to create pressure have been confiscated by TSA for mere gasoline smell - first hand experience :-)
Yes, I have heard of Pocket Rocket stoves being confiscated by TSA. I could not figure out why they would have until I saw the TSA guy rubbing his fingers on the pot supports of my Optimus Nova when he said, that looks a lot sharper on the X ray, I will let it pass. That was when I figured out that anything that looks sharp on an X ray machine screen should not be in your carry on.

The older style Pocket Rocket (not the Pocket Rocket 2) has sharp pointy ends on the pot supports that I could imagine a TSA agent confiscating. This link has a photo of the older style.
https://www.campsaver.com/msr-pocket-rocket-stove.html
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Old 06-20-18, 08:39 AM
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Originally Posted by travelinhobo View Post
Of course you can fly with stoves. What's that about?? I always used the MSR Whisperlite Intl, but never liked it mainly because it doesn't simmer. Biked Venezuela in 99. Don't Remy what fuel they had, but since that was where the tour began, know fuel is available.

In 1999 the rules were different, I used to travel with a swiss army knife in my pocket back then. Now anything that TSA thinks could be a danger is not going to get on the plane.

An empty fuel bottle or stove that has a slight odor is not a hazard, but TSA will confiscate it anyway. Gasoline or coleman fuel can be smelled by the human nose at a few parts per million, but the lower explosive limit is over a percent (or over 10,000 parts per million). So, a slight odor is a poor way to measure a genuine hazard, but that won't stop TSA from keeping your stove or fuel bottle from getting on the plane.
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Old 06-20-18, 09:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
In 1999 the rules were different, I used to travel with a swiss army knife in my pocket back then. Now anything that TSA thinks could be a danger is not going to get on the plane.

An empty fuel bottle or stove that has a slight odor is not a hazard, but TSA will confiscate it anyway. Gasoline or coleman fuel can be smelled by the human nose at a few parts per million, but the lower explosive limit is over a percent (or over 10,000 parts per million). So, a slight odor is a poor way to measure a genuine hazard, but that won't stop TSA from keeping your stove or fuel bottle from getting on the plane.
I was expressly told by a TSA agent that such things will, in fact, be confiscated if found due to fuel and burn residue. Not interested in losing my MSR Dragonfly and/or Optimus Nova so I ship them inside my bike box along with my empty fuel bottle. Don't know what I will do if I ever tour internationally again.

When I took Amtrfak to Vermont a few weeks ago I was carrying a full fuel bottle, which I am certain was a no no. When I entered the station I saw a several police. One of them had a dog. I made sure I stayed far away so pooch didn't pick up any scent.
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Old 06-20-18, 09:38 AM
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being around sailboats, etc, one benefit was safety,
unlike other fuels
leaks of Alcohol,
won't settle in the bottom of the boat and go boom , !!
uncontrolled fires on boats are not fun..
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Old 06-20-18, 09:45 AM
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
I was expressly told by a TSA agent that such things will, in fact, be confiscated if found due to fuel and burn residue. Not interested in losing my MSR Dragonfly and/or Optimus Nova so I ship them inside my bike box along with my empty fuel bottle. Don't know what I will do if I ever tour internationally again.

When I took Amtrfak to Vermont a few weeks ago I was carrying a full fuel bottle, which I am certain was a no no. When I entered the station I saw a several police. One of them had a dog. I made sure I stayed far away so pooch didn't pick up any scent.
My next international trip - depends on how long it is. If a few weeks I will likely plan on buying fuel canisters. But if over a month I likely will again go through the hassle of cleaning out my fuel bottles, etc. I carried my fuel bottles (empty, no lids) in my S&S case with my bike. I posted a link a few posts above that had some suggestions for flying with a stove, that link included this link:
https://thesummitregister.com/wp-con...ing-Stoves.pdf

I printed that off and wrapped it around each of my fuel bottles before putting them in my S&S case. I would again carry my fuel pump in my carry on (has no sharp edges) and the burner head in my other checked bag. I would also carry a tiny little butane stove as an emergency back up stove in my checked bag as a backup in case part of the liquid fuel stove is confiscated.

I would prefer that my Optimus Nova is not confiscated, but I own a few Novas so if I lost a stove, the Nova is the one that I would prefer to lose. The trip I am planning for next summer is five weeks and it would be flying international, I will likely take a Nova along. Plus a tiny butane stove as a backup.

***

Amtrak prohibits flammable liquids and gases according to their website. That would include Coleman fuel. It would also include alcohol for an alcohol stove.

Amtrak website is silent on combustible liquids. Kerosene is not flammable, it instead is combustible. But the odds of an Amtrak inspector knowing definitions of things like that and the exact rules is in my opinion pretty low. I had an Amtrak station manager tell me I could not have a can of soup in my checked bag - he said it was hazardous waste and I could not carry hazardous waste in my checked bag. Yup, he actually told me that my Campbells soup is a hazardous waste, which of course is a total crock. When a station manger told me that, it told me how little training their staff actually has on what is and is not prohibited.
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Old 06-20-18, 10:29 AM
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Thanks to everyone for the info, seems like the alcohol stove is the way to go. Can buy denatured alcohol in every pharmacy so fuel shouldn't be a problem.

Cheers
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