Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Touring endlessly?

Reply

Old 07-12-18, 07:52 AM
  #26  
PedalingWalrus
Senior Member
 
PedalingWalrus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Maine, USA
Posts: 657

Bikes: Surly Ice Cream Truck, Surly Disk Trucker, Salsa Warbird, Salsa Beargrease

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 202 Post(s)
That's one of my fantasies to tour and be able to play music in the evening to get a few dollars and the enjoyment of music, compose new stuff on the tour... not sure how it clashes with the reality of touring though and the money is probably only good in developed countries :-) might have to play for food in other countries :-)


Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
There is no longer a penalty for not having insurance.

And one could always bring one's instrument along to earn a few $s.
PedalingWalrus is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 07:53 AM
  #27  
bikenh
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,178
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 103 Post(s)
Originally Posted by PedalingWalrus View Post
Each tour could be tons of days or very few but each has some kind of structure and purpose. Going home could mean going where the rest of your stuff is or visiting your kids or parents ... I have no idea but that's my sense of touring that makes sense. Just touring forever is probably good for a quick burnout and 10K sounds too low. I would say try for 20K and if You hit 10 K you'll have 1`0 left over to tour more expensive country like Iceland or Norway next time.
10K. What makes you think that. On my 2015, 8500 mile, 3 month long trip I spent $1400. Last year for the entire year of living I spent less than $4000. For that matter over the past decade, living by myself, on my own, I've never spent $10K all expenses included. I kept meticulous track of my expenses through out the year so I know how much I spend and what I spend it on. It's why I gave up the automobile, it used to be 40-50% of the money I was spending each year. I gave it up and saved myself a boatload of money and gave myself a whole new ton of freedom. You don't have to spend a lot while touring, unless you think you have to.
bikenh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 08:12 AM
  #28  
mtb_addict
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
mtb_addict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 3,045
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2208 Post(s)
I original wrote $10k on the first post, but edited it out. I just threw the number up there. I figured $1200/month rent would get me $10k in my bank account per year. All just guesses.

The idea is to keep expenses down, like take advantage of free camping... cook my own meal...buy cloths at thrift store. Stretch out the dollar as much as possible. Yeah...sounds alot like being homeless, but unlike 'em, you have money to spend.

Maybe "endlessly" is too long. Maybe I should think a year or two or three of continuus living on the bike.

I mean, you don't have to ride everyday...like if you find free camping...maybe you can stay there for a few days.

I forgot about health care cost. Yeah...that sux...and I'm old enough that not having health insurance is probably not a good idea.
mtb_addict is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 08:16 AM
  #29  
saddlesores
Senior Member
 
saddlesores's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Bangkok...and....Hainan
Posts: 2,908

Bikes: inferior steel....and....noodly aluminium

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 654 Post(s)
nah, don't need to cook, don't need to camp. $25 will cover hotel or guesthouse, meals and snacks in much of se.asia.

yah, healthcare is cheap for day-to-day needs. but when you get hit by an idiot playing-on-cellphone driver here in thailand (#1 globally for traffic deaths!), ICU is hideously expensive. when the cash in your wallet runs out, the plug gets pulled. if you're conscious and owe money, they keep your passport, hold you prisoner in the hospital until the bill is paid. gofundme is popular. medivac flights start at $50K,
saddlesores is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 08:18 AM
  #30  
PedalingWalrus
Senior Member
 
PedalingWalrus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Maine, USA
Posts: 657

Bikes: Surly Ice Cream Truck, Surly Disk Trucker, Salsa Warbird, Salsa Beargrease

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 202 Post(s)
I wasn't the one who thought the number of 10K but hey based on your math there is more money left over for next year...a nice problem to have :-)



Originally Posted by bikenh View Post
10K. What makes you think that. On my 2015, 8500 mile, 3 month long trip I spent $1400. Last year for the entire year of living I spent less than $4000. For that matter over the past decade, living by myself, on my own, I've never spent $10K all expenses included. I kept meticulous track of my expenses through out the year so I know how much I spend and what I spend it on. It's why I gave up the automobile, it used to be 40-50% of the money I was spending each year. I gave it up and saved myself a boatload of money and gave myself a whole new ton of freedom. You don't have to spend a lot while touring, unless you think you have to.
PedalingWalrus is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 10:42 AM
  #31  
jefnvk
Senior Member
 
jefnvk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Metro Detroit/AA
Posts: 7,745

Bikes: 2016 Novara Mazama

Mentioned: 55 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3320 Post(s)
Originally Posted by bikenh View Post
10K. What makes you think that. On my 2015, 8500 mile, 3 month long trip I spent $1400. Last year for the entire year of living I spent less than $4000. For that matter over the past decade, living by myself, on my own, I've never spent $10K all expenses included. I kept meticulous track of my expenses through out the year so I know how much I spend and what I spend it on. It's why I gave up the automobile, it used to be 40-50% of the money I was spending each year. I gave it up and saved myself a boatload of money and gave myself a whole new ton of freedom. You don't have to spend a lot while touring, unless you think you have to.
Are you in America?

If so, $4000 a year? How much are taxes on your residence (as I assume it is paid off)? Even a cheap apartment is costing most people over $4000 a year.

$11 a day? Yeah, I could probably exist on $11 a day assuming I gave up most any comforts and stealth camped the entire time. There is a big difference between existing and enjoying yourself, though. I don't call freedom simply existing,
jefnvk is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 01:31 PM
  #32  
axolotl
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,711
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 128 Post(s)
I hosted a cyclist who was traveling perpetually. He was essentially a homeless person on a bike and was mentally ill, IMO.

I once traveled for 14 months, 8 of which were bike touring. I toured on 3 continents on that trip. I had a health insurance policy which was fairly inexpensive because I was 25 at the time I began. As for the ACA, the premiums vary enormously based on the state, region of the state, & age (in most states). There are also premium subsidies available for many, and they, too, vary based on locale. But for Americans who wish to tour long-term outside of the USA, a travel health insurance policy probably makes much more sense.
axolotl is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 04:52 PM
  #33  
bikenh
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,178
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 103 Post(s)
Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
Are you in America?

If so, $4000 a year? How much are taxes on your residence (as I assume it is paid off)? Even a cheap apartment is costing most people over $4000 a year.

$11 a day? Yeah, I could probably exist on $11 a day assuming I gave up most any comforts and stealth camped the entire time. There is a big difference between existing and enjoying yourself, though. I don't call freedom simply existing,
I live in New Hampshire. I paid cash when I bought my house, I just made sure to buy wisely, not stupidly like most people. I'm single, live by myself, and have freedom, no honey do this jobs for this guy. I pay $900/ year for property taxes, $300/year roughly for electricity. Don't have landline phone, use tracfone which I hardly ever use it so $80/year for service on the tracfone. I don't have internet access at home and use free wifi all the time. I haven't had a TV in my house for a decade now so no cable/satellite bill. I don't own a car so I don't have all the auto expenses most fools have. No, I've been unemployed since December 2009, I'm 45 years old, and no I don't get any gov't assistance of any kind. I am part owner of a farm out in the midwest that doesn't make enough money to where I have to pay any income taxes, under $10K per year of income from the farm.

The last time I spent over $10k in a year was 2007. All the time in mine to spend as I wish. I can do whatever I want to do...that's freedom, whether that be at home or out on the open riding traveling across the country on a bicycle I can go go where I want for as long as I want...that's freedom. It doesn't take money to have freedom. God provided everything on this planet and he gave it to mankind free of charge to take care of. It's mankind that has put a price tag on everything. When you spend money to buy something you are losing your freedom. You have to make the money to be able to spend it. To make the money takes time, which takes away your freedom. The only way to gain real freedom is stop spending money and starting gaining time. You just have to find a way to work around the obstacle of thinking you have to spend money to have such and such an item, or to go here or there. It doesn't take money to do that, it's take a whole new way of thinking about how to have more and spend less. The catch...the more you have the less freedom you have because you have to have someplace to store those prized possessions, you have to upkeep those possessions which takes time, money or both time and money away from you. The more you spend...the less freedom you have, both time freedom but more importantly psychological freedom. The game of 'Keeping Up With The Jones' is rigged against you and you aren't smart enough to realize it. As long as you play the game, you are guaranteed to lose. The only way to win the game, is to not play it. I gave up playing that game a long time ago. I don't care what the Jones own. They can own all the crap they want to own. I have freedom...not possessions. My house is basically a shack, 468 square feet. I live in 32 square feet of it. The rest is for storage...I only heated 32 square feet of it last winter, and could actually make the heated smaller.

Go back to wasting you time now...go back and check your fbook account. Someone just posted something nasty about you over there. You better make sure to clear it up before it goes viral. Yeah, give up more of time...waste it on fbook...like an idiot. I've never had a fbook/sh*tter account. I know better. Just more ways to lose your freedom AND privacy.

What I'm saying...how much freedom do you really think you have. I would be willing to be if you really stopped and looked at what you think freedom is, versus what freedom realy is you would be quite surprised at just how much of a slave you really are. Slavery never ended...it's just changed it's name. It's not slave and master anymore...now it's employee and employer. There are pretty much the same thing, just the names have changed.

Toward the tail end of my bike trip in 2015 I remember when I come to realize I had been out on the road a bit too long. I was riding through the WV/MD/PA area and the thought came to mind 'You know I could live out here full time on the open road for far less than I can live back home'. I started thinking about it and I knew if I changed the way I ride(no more 125 miles per day but rather the normal bike touring 50-75 miles per day) I could easily drop my expenses down to $2500/year very easily. I could be out traveling full time, year round, here stateside. You know how many miles of road there are in the United States. It's so easy to go out and ride continuously on different roads all the time and always be seeing new things/places/people.

There are plenty of people who can show you how, start listening to some of the podcasts that are other. One guy spent 11 years traveling around the world on his bicycle. Another guy travels the world for free, doing volunteer help. Trying listing to The Pursuit Zone podcast. It's loaded with quite valuable podcast covering a wide range of topics, from sail, rowing, cycling, walking, volunteering, etc to spend your time out traveling. It's highly doable to do it and do it very cheap. Heck you could probably even end up getting to the point where the traveling is your income source. Like I said above you just have to learn to look at things in a whole new way if you wish you find a new answer to the same question.
bikenh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 06:18 PM
  #34  
jefnvk
Senior Member
 
jefnvk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Metro Detroit/AA
Posts: 7,745

Bikes: 2016 Novara Mazama

Mentioned: 55 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3320 Post(s)
Originally Posted by bikenh View Post
I only heated 32 square feet of it last winter, and could actually make the heated smaller.

Go back to wasting you time now...go back and check your fbook account. Someone just posted something nasty about you over there. You better make sure to clear it up before it goes viral. Yeah, give up more of time...waste it on fbook...like an idiot. I've never had a fbook/sh*tter account. I know better. Just more ways to lose your freedom AND privacy.
Try not to fall of that high horse when you get down

I'm not even going to attempt to argue most of this, because it is extraordinarily extreme. You live in less than a 6'x6' area through New England winters. Got it, you simply exist. We can be slaves to many things, to me, you're simply a slave to frugality.

And it seems kind of odd you'd react so extremely then throw out that I should go back to social media and look at what someone has theoretically said about me, as some sort of insult. What is the effective difference about caring about something on Facebook, and the diatribe you just went on over a response to something someone online asked you?
jefnvk is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 07:05 PM
  #35  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 4,583

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Pink Klein MTB, Phil Wood VeloXS Frame (that will soon have DA 7400), Cilo Road Frame

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 920 Post(s)
I like bicycle touring but doing it alone for a long period wouldn't be as fun at least not for me. I think if I did multiple tours over a period of time with different people with maybe some smaller alone tours might be cool but I wouldn't want to go homeless type of thing. However I have multiple bikes that I enjoy riding and wouldn't want to go down to just one. I guess if I had too I would build up a pretty sweet Ti Firefly dressed to the nines that has as much versatility as possible.
veganbikes is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 07:07 PM
  #36  
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 2,536
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 891 Post(s)
Yeah... going by the vitriol in that rant I don't think it's freedom at all. Real freedom comes from being at peace with your lifestyle without the need to justify it by looking down on those who differ.
Happy Feet is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 07:35 PM
  #37  
saddlesores
Senior Member
 
saddlesores's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Bangkok...and....Hainan
Posts: 2,908

Bikes: inferior steel....and....noodly aluminium

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 654 Post(s)
Originally Posted by bikenh View Post
blahblahblah
awesome manifesto by the unabiker!

but dude, you're still paying too much! buy yourself a nice little place, 900-1000 sq.ft. in a small west texas town for $25K or less. get the homestead exemption and pay $50 annual property taxes. don't pay heating....evah. go tour elsewhere in the summers, so don't pay for ac neither. enjoy the no personal income tax state. learn the ancient secrets of briscuit.
saddlesores is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 08:12 PM
  #38  
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 2,536
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 891 Post(s)
It's an interesting question in the sense that I think it really isn't good for people to be detached from social commitments for too long a period because one loses the feeling of social connection and begins to view society in a negative way (aka the rant) yet I also believing that people should detach occasionally for some period of time to clarify their own beliefs in solitude.

In my case one could say I am constrained by my job, a physical rehabilitation assistant working with seniors in care, and by the student debt that I incurred to gain qualification. That would be true. At the same time my job allows me to assist people to regain function and provides very important social interaction for those who might otherwise be quite emotionally isolated. Many people do not have family members who visit and/or suffer from isolation and depression and many times I have been told the time I spend may be the highlight of their day because for that period of time I closely focus on them as a person.

So it is an obligation that I occasionally chafe against while recognizing it also provides a tremendous sense of personal purpose and meaning in my own life, independent of what it does for others.

People sometimes question why I enjoy solo bike touring and whether I miss being with people. My answer is that I am so interconnected with people on such a personal level in my daily life that I need to decompress and have "me" time where I concentrate on nothing but my needs. Yet a life of constantly living only for myself would tend to feel valueless after the thrill factor wore off. I suspect, given the chance, I would eventually start to look for some way to connect with others and make my experiences more beneficial. I already do that sometimes by linking bike riding and fundraising/awareness campaigns as well as running a therapeutic bicycle program for seniors where I take them for rides in a wheelchair adapted bike

I share many of the same concerns that biken does in regards to consumerism, living with less, valuing time and making choices based on my value system but I wouldn't want to become so disconnected that I called all those who differed fools. At that point I would cease to be helpful towards them and lose any societal value my lifestyle might hold, even if only by example.

Last edited by Happy Feet; 07-12-18 at 08:24 PM.
Happy Feet is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 08:27 PM
  #39  
vja4Him
GadgetJim57
 
vja4Him's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Central California
Posts: 777

Bikes: Yuba Sweet Curry eBike, Surly Long Haul Trucker

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 48 Post(s)
We recently hosted a cyclist from France (through Warm Showers). He is a professional juggler with the Juggling Sticks. He has been making enough money from juggling to pay for his tour up through South America, Central America, and Mexico, but doesn't make much in the US. He is on his way to Alaska …..
vja4Him is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 08:44 PM
  #40  
vja4Him
GadgetJim57
 
vja4Him's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Central California
Posts: 777

Bikes: Yuba Sweet Curry eBike, Surly Long Haul Trucker

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 48 Post(s)
Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
Try not to fall of that high horse when you get down

I'm not even going to attempt to argue most of this, because it is extraordinarily extreme. You live in less than a 6'x6' area through New England winters. Got it, you simply exist. We can be slaves to many things, to me, you're simply a slave to frugality.

And it seems kind of odd you'd react so extremely then throw out that I should go back to social media and look at what someone has theoretically said about me, as some sort of insult. What is the effective difference about caring about something on Facebook, and the diatribe you just went on over a response to something someone online asked you?
Yeah …. some people are what you call "Extreme Cheapskates" … !!! Anybody ever watch that show … I watched all of those shows, some of them several times. I actually did learn some new tricks to be thrifty, but nothing "Life Changing." I have always been conservative, careful, not wasteful. I was raised that way, and just about everyone I knew when I was growing up the 50s and 60s was like that. I do not waste any food. Save all left-overs … rotate my food carefully …

I see the extremist, like the Extreme Cheapskates as being just that >>> "Extreme" … going overboard … eating out of dumpsters … Using only one lightbulb for the entire house … only 2-minutes showers … peeing in a bottle and watering your plants with your pee … even making all of your guests pee in a bottle … only using the toilet for pooping, and only flushing once a week !!! Living to that extreme is just another forum of "Slavery" ….

No place is perfect, but with all the modern technological advances …. we have many benefits … at least where I live in the US … clean and safe drinking water … relative peace (our neighborhood is actually "Very Peaceful" ….. good food to eat … even for poor people, like myself … not the best health care, but still have health care … my public education was actually reasonable good … so many things to be thankful for … family friends … freedom … reasonable good health (despite numerous health issues). At least I can still walk, take care of myself … ride my bicycle … work part-time … and so much more …..
vja4Him is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 08:45 PM
  #41  
Abu Mahendra
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Bali
Posts: 2,233

Bikes: In service - FSIR Spin 3.0, Bannard Sunny minivelo, Dahon Dash Altena folder. Several others in construction or temporarily decommissioned.

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 875 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Happy Feet View Post
It's an interesting question in the sense that I think it really isn't good for people to be detached from social commitments for too long a period because one loses the feeling of social connection and begins to view society in a negative way (aka the rant) yet I also believing that people should detach occasionally for some period of time to clarify their own beliefs in solitude.

In my case one could say I am constrained by my job, a physical rehabilitation assistant working with seniors in care, and by the student debt that I incurred to gain qualification. That would be true. At the same time my job allows me to assist people to regain function and provides very important social interaction for those who might otherwise be quite emotionally isolated. Many people do not have family members who visit and/or suffer from isolation and depression and many times I have been told the time I spend may be the highlight of their day because for that period of time I closely focus on them as a person.

So it is an obligation that I occasionally chafe against while recognizing it also provides a tremendous sense of personal purpose and meaning in my own life, independent of what it does for others.

People sometimes question why I enjoy solo bike touring and whether I miss being with people. My answer is that I am so interconnected with people on such a personal level in my daily life that I need to decompress and have "me" time where I concentrate on nothing but my needs. Yet a life of constantly living only for myself would tend to feel valueless after the thrill factor wore off. I suspect, given the chance, I would eventually start to look for some way to connect with others and make my experiences more beneficial. I already do that sometimes by linking bike riding and fundraising/awareness campaigns as well as running a therapeutic bicycle program for seniors where I take them for rides in a wheelchair adapted bike

I share many of the same concerns that biken does in regards to consumerism, living with less, valuing time and making choices based on my value system but I wouldn't want to become so disconnected that I called all those who differed fools. At that point I would cease to be helpful towards them and lose any societal value my lifestyle might hold, even if only by example.
For my money, you are leading a more balanced, well-rounded life. Connected-ness, community, family and meaning are what sustains human beings and societies, not a one-dimensional search for 'freedom'. For my money, the extreme 'freedom' (disconnectedness) in the US is largely to account for many of its societal ills (gun violence, homicide, drug and substance abuse, petty criminality). Drifters are not the stuff of succesful societies.

Last edited by Abu Mahendra; 07-12-18 at 08:52 PM.
Abu Mahendra is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 08:53 PM
  #42  
vja4Him
GadgetJim57
 
vja4Him's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Central California
Posts: 777

Bikes: Yuba Sweet Curry eBike, Surly Long Haul Trucker

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 48 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Happy Feet View Post
It's an interesting question in the sense that I think it really isn't good for people to be detached from social commitments for too long a period because one loses the feeling of social connection and begins to view society in a negative way (aka the rant) yet I also believing that people should detach occasionally for some period of time to clarify their own beliefs in solitude.

In my case one could say I am constrained by my job, a physical rehabilitation assistant working with seniors in care, and by the student debt that I incurred to gain qualification. That would be true. At the same time my job allows me to assist people to regain function and provides very important social interaction for those who might otherwise be quite emotionally isolated. Many people do not have family members who visit and/or suffer from isolation and depression and many times I have been told the time I spend may be the highlight of their day because for that period of time I closely focus on them as a person.

So it is an obligation that I occasionally chafe against while recognizing it also provides a tremendous sense of personal purpose and meaning in my own life, independent of what it does for others.

People sometimes question why I enjoy solo bike touring and whether I miss being with people. My answer is that I am so interconnected with people on such a personal level in my daily life that I need to decompress and have "me" time where I concentrate on nothing but my needs. Yet a life of constantly living only for myself would tend to feel valueless after the thrill factor wore off. I suspect, given the chance, I would eventually start to look for some way to connect with others and make my experiences more beneficial. I already do that sometimes by linking bike riding and fundraising/awareness campaigns as well as running a therapeutic bicycle program for seniors where I take them for rides in a wheelchair adapted bike

I share many of the same concerns that biken does in regards to consumerism, living with less, valuing time and making choices based on my value system but I wouldn't want to become so disconnected that I called all those who differed fools. At that point I would cease to be helpful towards them and lose any societal value my lifestyle might hold, even if only by example.
You summed up the matter very well !!! I am pretty much in the same situation as you. I work as a substitute teacher, all grade levels, all subjects. I really do enjoy my line of work …. never know what to expect from one day to the next … Some classes I have for more than one day, or even several weeks. I too find the social connection important, even if I might see some of the students only once, or twice, and not again until next year, or even several years later. Every once in awhile I run into my students years later. They remember me, but I often do not remember them. It's very fulfilling to see them grown up, working, support their own family, happy, with their own car, hobbies, etc. …..

Some of the kids have a terrible life at home, but hopefully I can make a difference …. by encouraging them, showing them that I care, and want to help them. Even some of the bad kids, now grown up, working, smile when they see me, and thank me for helping them !!! That really makes my day …. or even my life more worthwhile.

I too need the "Alone Time" …. to do stuff for myself …. and I really don't mind traveling alone, although I do hope that I will find other cyclists to tag along with sometimes …..
vja4Him is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 10:39 PM
  #43  
alan s 
Senior Member
 
alan s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 6,252
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1058 Post(s)
What’s apparently lost by some in this discussion is the concept of making a meaningful contribution to the world or at least trying to. Simply living off the land serves no real purpose. You are existing, but nothing more. Raising a family, doing a job that makes a difference, helping others in need, writing a book, etc. These things can make a difference. Riding a bike from Point A to Point B to Point C and on and on endlessly is truly selfish and ultimately unimportant and a waste of your precious time here on Earth.

At a minimum, learn to play an instrument, let’s say the accordion, and entertain your fellow man.

Last edited by alan s; 07-12-18 at 10:43 PM.
alan s is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 10:54 PM
  #44  
vja4Him
GadgetJim57
 
vja4Him's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Central California
Posts: 777

Bikes: Yuba Sweet Curry eBike, Surly Long Haul Trucker

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 48 Post(s)
Originally Posted by alan s View Post
What’s apparently lost by some in this discussion is the concept of making a meaningful contribution to the world or at least trying to. Simply living off the land serves no real purpose. You are existing, but nothing more. Raising a family, doing a job that makes a difference, helping others in need, writing a book, etc. These things can make a difference. Riding a bike from Point A to Point B to Point C and on and on endlessly is truly selfish and ultimately unimportant and a waste of your precious time here on Earth.

At a minimum, learn to play an instrument, let’s say the accordion, and entertain your fellow man.
I will be taking along my Harmonica … When I can find a hard-shell case for my Black Mountain Dulcimer, I will take that along on my journeys too ….. I might even take my great-grandfather's Jews Harp (from the 1800s) ….. I also have a Panpipe. I would also like to practice bird calls …..
vja4Him is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 11:02 PM
  #45  
Dave Cutter
Senior Member
 
Dave Cutter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: D'uh... I am a Cutter
Posts: 6,166

Bikes: '17 Access Old Turnpike Gravel bike, '14 Trek 1.1, '13 Cannondale CAAD 10, '98 CAAD 2, R300

Mentioned: 62 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1553 Post(s)
I know I sometimes think about an extended tour of some sort. I read a book: Spandex Optional Bicycle Touring: How to ride long distance, the cheap and easy way. Rice, Peter

I liked the authors writing style. He sure removed any glamor from the idea of pedaling around the world. And... when I think about it... there is plenty enough sweat and stink with cycling even living in a house. But still.... They are finishing some Europe crossing MUPS now... and over the nest few years. Spending a summer riding across Europe sounds like a great adventure. But it isn't a living! It would likely blow away a chunk of retirement saving.
Dave Cutter is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 11:05 PM
  #46  
saddlesores
Senior Member
 
saddlesores's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Bangkok...and....Hainan
Posts: 2,908

Bikes: inferior steel....and....noodly aluminium

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 654 Post(s)
Originally Posted by alan s View Post
...
At a minimum, learn to play an instrument, let’s say the accordion, and entertain your fellow man.
i must admit....yes. yes, i am.

saddlesores is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 11:40 PM
  #47  
downtube42
Senior Member
 
downtube42's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 1,856

Bikes: Volae Team, '76 Motobecane Grand Jubile, Priority Eight, Nimbus MUni

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 40 Post(s)
While visiting Big Big park in Texas last year, I ran across a couple who said they had been on the road for a very very long time. 17 years IIRC. He was French, she was American. They jointly owned an apartment building in France; that was their income and they managed the business remotely. They had cyclo-toured much of the world; America was just their current trip. I found their story hard to believe, but looking at their equipment... all very solid, quality stuff and no nonsense. Wide tire, fendered trekking bikes, quality camping gear. They were in a paid camping area at a motel, cooking their own dinner but making use of the bathrooms and water at the adjacent restaurant. Their story was convincing.

He said she was getting tired of touring, and that in a year or so they were going to buy a place somewhere and just do day and weekend trips. I'd guess they were in their late 40's, but with their weathered but fit bodies it was hard to tell.

I didn't get into personal topics like annual income/expenses, but my impression is they stayed in pay campgrounds, cooked all meals themselves, and maintained quality gear. There couldn't have been much of a social life other than each-other.

I was pretty much in awe. That two people willing to live such a life found each-other. That they could live such socially isolated lives. Are these homeless people? I suppose technically. But they had choices most homeless people don't. Just really amazing.
downtube42 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-18, 09:18 AM
  #48  
bikenh
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,178
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 103 Post(s)
Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
Try not to fall of that high horse when you get down

I'm not even going to attempt to argue most of this, because it is extraordinarily extreme. You live in less than a 6'x6' area through New England winters. Got it, you simply exist. We can be slaves to many things, to me, you're simply a slave to frugality.

And it seems kind of odd you'd react so extremely then throw out that I should go back to social media and look at what someone has theoretically said about me, as some sort of insult. What is the effective difference about caring about something on Facebook, and the diatribe you just went on over a response to something someone online asked you?
Yeah, 4'x8' to be exact. About the only thing I use home for is a place to eat and sleep, nothing else. I spend most of my time out and about on the bike, hence why I ride 10,000-20,000 miles a year. By staying out and about, around other people it keeps me from becoming someone like Ted Kaczynski or other 'madmen'. I can choose who I hang around though and I'm not be forced to be around people I don't like because the boss tells me I have to.

I guess I don't NEED anything more than 4x8. There is a difference between NEED and WANT. Sometime in life you might understand the difference. I'll give ya a hint...did mankind use to live without X, Y, or Z...if so it's a want, not a need. Mankind used to live with electricity until a guy decided to go out and fly a kite in the middle of an thunderstorm. All electrical/electronic devices are a want, not a need...you pay for it and keep on paying for it. It's called a service plan. If the service plan controls you, then you don't control it, and you don't have freedom. Try leaving your house tomorrow without your smartphone and see how you mentally react. Go take your wife out for supper and both of you leave your smartphone at home, see how you react. Does it control your or do you control it. Even when on a bike trip I don't carry a cell phone on me...I control it. If people don't like the fact they can't get ahold of me 24/7...too bad...get over it.

Some people will get what I say but most won't. Later on in life when they grow old and are close to death they will finally understand what I've said, because they have lived life long enough and seen how much people have gotten duped...including themselves. It just takes time and life experience. I'm glad I have come to understand this while I'm still young and can do something about it. I would much rather live a full life without regrets rather than grow old and then come to realize that I spent all my life chasing after stuff that didn't truly matter to me and I only chased after stuff to impressed people that were supposedly my friends. I guess it's why I've never drank, smoked or did drugs. I never had to impress other people, only myself.

The quickest way to impress yourself and have the memories of the experience is go beyond your self-imposed limitations. I've did that several times on bike trips. How did I go on the bike trips, because I had the freedom. I had the freedom because I didn't have to impress other people with what I owned or what I did with my life and as a result I had the time available to go on long bike trips and go beyond my personal limitations and impress only myself. The only thing that holds me back anymore is the things I would like to do are so much bigger than what I've already did and I need stuff that isn't available, at least not to my requirements. The corporate world builds for the masses, not the classes. The classes don't make the profits. That as well as I'm still looking for a decent location that meets all the requirements of what I would like to accomplish and I have a funny feeling such a location doesn't exist anywhere. ..the perfect world doesn't exist, this planet isn't perfect. I've hit a little thing called one-upmanship and I'm suffering badly from it. So I keep looking for what I need or a way to improvise things so I can build myself something that will give me what I need to accomplish the task in mind. When I get it I will go out on another much bigger bike trip and impress myself even more with what I do, going beyond all my personal limitations and do things most people would not even think of doing and couldn't do because they don't have the time available.

Stretch beyond your limitations, you might like the experience...it might become addictive...but be forewarned one-upmanship can leave a big hole in the heart/mind when you want bigger but just can't grab it.

Like I said, some people will understand what I've said, most won't.
bikenh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-18, 10:00 AM
  #49  
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 2,536
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 891 Post(s)
Originally Posted by bikenh View Post
Yeah, 4'x8' to be exact. About the only thing I use home for is a place to eat and sleep, nothing else. I spend most of my time out and about on the bike, hence why I ride 10,000-20,000 miles a year. By staying out and about, around other people it keeps me from becoming someone like Ted Kaczynski or other 'madmen'. I can choose who I hang around though and I'm not be forced to be around people I don't like because the boss tells me I have to.

I guess I don't NEED anything more than 4x8. There is a difference between NEED and WANT. Sometime in life you might understand the difference. I'll give ya a hint...did mankind use to live without X, Y, or Z...if so it's a want, not a need. Mankind used to live with electricity until a guy decided to go out and fly a kite in the middle of an thunderstorm. All electrical/electronic devices are a want, not a need...you pay for it and keep on paying for it. It's called a service plan. If the service plan controls you, then you don't control it, and you don't have freedom. Try leaving your house tomorrow without your smartphone and see how you mentally react. Go take your wife out for supper and both of you leave your smartphone at home, see how you react. Does it control your or do you control it. Even when on a bike trip I don't carry a cell phone on me...I control it. If people don't like the fact they can't get ahold of me 24/7...too bad...get over it.

Some people will get what I say but most won't. Later on in life when they grow old and are close to death they will finally understand what I've said, because they have lived life long enough and seen how much people have gotten duped...including themselves. It just takes time and life experience. I'm glad I have come to understand this while I'm still young and can do something about it. I would much rather live a full life without regrets rather than grow old and then come to realize that I spent all my life chasing after stuff that didn't truly matter to me and I only chased after stuff to impressed people that were supposedly my friends. I guess it's why I've never drank, smoked or did drugs. I never had to impress other people, only myself.

The quickest way to impress yourself and have the memories of the experience is go beyond your self-imposed limitations. I've did that several times on bike trips. How did I go on the bike trips, because I had the freedom. I had the freedom because I didn't have to impress other people with what I owned or what I did with my life and as a result I had the time available to go on long bike trips and go beyond my personal limitations and impress only myself. The only thing that holds me back anymore is the things I would like to do are so much bigger than what I've already did and I need stuff that isn't available, at least not to my requirements. The corporate world builds for the masses, not the classes. The classes don't make the profits. That as well as I'm still looking for a decent location that meets all the requirements of what I would like to accomplish and I have a funny feeling such a location doesn't exist anywhere. ..the perfect world doesn't exist, this planet isn't perfect. I've hit a little thing called one-upmanship and I'm suffering badly from it. So I keep looking for what I need or a way to improvise things so I can build myself something that will give me what I need to accomplish the task in mind. When I get it I will go out on another much bigger bike trip and impress myself even more with what I do, going beyond all my personal limitations and do things most people would not even think of doing and couldn't do because they don't have the time available.

Stretch beyond your limitations, you might like the experience...it might become addictive...but be forewarned one-upmanship can leave a big hole in the heart/mind when you want bigger but just can't grab it.

Like I said, some people will understand what I've said, most won't.
The problem with being alone too much is that you begin to see the world as "me vs them" which your post really expresses, although you may not be aware of it. You cannot inspire people by putting them down, it just turns them off. If one looks at those who inspire change they are usually accepting of others, even those who oppose them, while holding firm to their own principles.

As to the oneupmanship issue. Completely understand as I went through it quite severely in my younger days as a climber. A constant craving to do more coupled with the frustration of not being able to. My eye opener was doing a very sketchy climb with someone who later told me they tried to make themselves feel suicidal before climbs so they would not worry so much about falling. I realized I was playing in an arena with people who were mentally willing to pay a price for accomplishment that I was not. At that point I stepped off the "achievement" path and began pursuing climbs and eventually other outlets because they resonated with me personally, not because someone else thought they were the latest and greatest cutting edge.

Since then I have not been in the spot light for my accomplishments to anyone else but have felt far more fulfilled because everything I have done has meant something to me. At the same time I have been able to allow that others may actually be doing what is important to them, even if I don't get it, and am at peace with most of the world.

You are not the first to feel that way and many others have worked through those feelings.
Happy Feet is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-18, 06:47 PM
  #50  
bikenh
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,178
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 103 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Happy Feet View Post
The problem with being alone too much is that you begin to see the world as "me vs them" which your post really expresses, although you may not be aware of it. You cannot inspire people by putting them down, it just turns them off. If one looks at those who inspire change they are usually accepting of others, even those who oppose them, while holding firm to their own principles.

As to the oneupmanship issue. Completely understand as I went through it quite severely in my younger days as a climber. A constant craving to do more coupled with the frustration of not being able to. My eye opener was doing a very sketchy climb with someone who later told me they tried to make themselves feel suicidal before climbs so they would not worry so much about falling. I realized I was playing in an arena with people who were mentally willing to pay a price for accomplishment that I was not. At that point I stepped off the "achievement" path and began pursuing climbs and eventually other outlets because they resonated with me personally, not because someone else thought they were the latest and greatest cutting edge.

Since then I have not been in the spot light for my accomplishments to anyone else but have felt far more fulfilled because everything I have done has meant something to me. At the same time I have been able to allow that others may actually be doing what is important to them, even if I don't get it, and am at peace with most of the world.

You are not the first to feel that way and many others have worked through those feelings.
I can see what your saying. I probably do come across that way but that is not my intention. When I read the posts/replies here on BF I see the same thing all the time. I see the same concepts being talked about. I see the same way of doing things being talked about. I have did things a different way and it has worked absolutely fine for me. I'm not dead from riding on the open roads. You read here on the forum and it sounds like if you ride on the roads your gonna die. I have over 100,000 miles of road riding since the start of 2012 and I'm still alive. What I try to do is to present that their is another of doing things. There is more than one way to cross the country ona bicycle, not just the Northern TransAm route, kitty liter buckets make great panniers and great conversation starting pieces as well as you make stops around towns on your bike trip. In the case of this post the OP was asking the thoughts on riding endlessly, living on the road. I have seen the possibility and realize it can be done for very little money and the more things I hear the less money it could be done for, potentially mostly free. You could live essentially 'full time'(no permanent address) on the open road and do it for next to nothing, potentially less than $1000/year, and maybe significantly less than that. You just have to learn to think outside the box as to how to do it. My mind has expand quite greatly by listening The Pursuit Zone podcast, and I have a feeling when I get through all those podcasts that I have downloaded and then start listening to the Pedalshift podcasts they will expand even more greatly.

To the OPer, do your digging and you might be surprised just how cheaply you could live full time and have quite a fulfilling lifestyle even though you don't have a permanent address and spend a big chunk of your time traveling around the country/world on a bicycle for years on end. It will only get bored when you get bored, not any other time. As long as you keep it invigorating you will continue to want to do it. Step one, learn who you are, aka, what do you like. What are you willing to do, not to do.

From one of the podcast, the one on volunteering, I absolutely the ideas that it has created for me. Their are plenty of websites that are volunteer for room and board. Sign up generally for a 2-3 week stint at something like an organic farm. You work a couple hours a day to cover room and board while your there. The rest of the day is yours to do with as you please...potentially exploring the local area on your bicycle. My addition to thought is to simply both not explore the local area by bicycle but to use the bicycle to travel between volunteer jobs. The jobs could be doing anything and probably just about everything. While you are recovering from the traveling in between volunteer job sites you can still be exploring the local area and get to see a nice chunk of country as result. You're spend 2-3 weeks, or however long in a particular area. It would keep expenses, with more than likely full indoor facilities every night other than while traveling to a new job site. You aren't tacking on as many miles on the bike as you normally would since you are 'home-based' for weeks at a time so your bicycle expenses would drop quite considerably compared to regular touring. While you are on any job site room and board is taken care of. The only real expenses are between job sites. While on the job site you could be writing a book about your experience or anything like that to help support while between job sites. Etc, etc, etc.

Go explore other ideas, not just the standard bicycle touring ideas. Look at everything, not just one thing. It's would be quite easy to go out and fully enjoy living full time without a permanent address for the long haul duration, potentially the rest of your life. Unlike normal bicycle touring where you get into town during the day and leave the town the same day in the case of volunteering you are at the same site for a few weeks at a stretch. You will get to better know a different group of people and make what could easily be longer term friendships than you ever could by doing standard bicycle touring...even though you still are doing standard bicycle touring.

Yeah, Happy, my two previous posts SUCKED. This one is much better My other posts still say it quite well though. Everybody is different and you can try to get input from a forum but the best input comes from within, not from some forum. Each person knows what makes them tick, if not they need to find out what makes them tick before they do anything else. Only you can decided what works for you, no one else can do that.
bikenh is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service