Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Camera recommendation

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Camera recommendation

Old 08-25-18, 04:26 AM
  #26  
Not lost wanderer.
 
bwilli88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Lititz, Pa
Posts: 3,357

Bikes: In USA; 73 Raleigh Super Course dingle speed, 72 Raleigh Gran Sport SS, 72 Geoffry Butler, 81 Centurion Pro-Tour, 74 Gugie Grandier Sportier

Mentioned: 73 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 890 Post(s)
Liked 1,020 Times in 536 Posts
Sony a6000 series is great. I have a NEX-6 the precursor and it is great. The 16-70 Zeiss zoom I have is tremendous.
bwilli88 is offline  
Old 08-25-18, 06:26 AM
  #27  
str
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Spain
Posts: 1,078
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 279 Post(s)
Liked 509 Times in 246 Posts
there is so much talking about cameras, about the technical aspects. use any camera you feel like, even a phone. its not the camera what takes the pictures.....
most people see their pictures only on a computer screen, then again, any camera does the job.

now, you want to PRINT BIG! then start to think about a good equipment.
str is offline  
Old 08-25-18, 07:47 AM
  #28  
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: La-la Land, CA
Posts: 3,622

Bikes: Cannondale Quick SL1 Bike - 2014

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3405 Post(s)
Liked 240 Times in 185 Posts
On the other hand, a good camera e.g. auto exposure, auto focus, face detection, high dynamic range, etc., can make even an amateur photographer look good. So long as he can at least frame a shot.
KraneXL is offline  
Old 08-25-18, 10:59 AM
  #29  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Eds0123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Spokane Area
Posts: 313

Bikes: 2021 Salsa Warbird, (Specially Love my) 2021 Salsa Cutthroat, 2012 Surly LHT, 2015 Surly Cross-Check, 2008 Giant OCR A1, 2005 Leader 735R, 2005 Gary Fisher Montare, 1991 Nishiki Pueblo,

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Liked 57 Times in 38 Posts
Originally Posted by KraneXL
On the other hand, a good camera e.g. auto exposure, auto focus, face detection, high dynamic range, etc., can make even an amateur photographer look good. So long as he can at least frame a shot.
Agree, I wont even call myself amateur phtographer but I have a shot of Dry Falls in Idaho taken by my just half way decent Android phone as wallpaper on my monitor at work and most people are very impressed when they see it for 1st time, just because the lighting and the angle and the subject was great.
Eds0123 is offline  
Old 08-25-18, 11:10 AM
  #30  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Center of Central CA
Posts: 1,582
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 897 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 9 Times in 8 Posts
The photographer's eye is far more important than the camera, as well as knowing how to best capture the shot you want.
Colnago Mixte is offline  
Old 08-25-18, 11:46 AM
  #31  
Senior Member
 
Doug64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Oregon
Posts: 6,495
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1185 Post(s)
Liked 842 Times in 438 Posts
Originally Posted by Colnago Mixte
The photographer's eye is far more important than the camera, as well as knowing how to best capture the shot you want.
I agree, however for action shots and sports such as cycling where there are some advantages to a camera over a phone. There are also advantages of an eye level viewfinder over a rear camera screen. When photographing people a camera with an eye level view finder is less obtrusive than a phone or camera shoved at arms length at a person. I've taken pictures with a suitable camera that would be extremely difficult or impossible to get with a phone or some point and shoot cameras.

I think the questions are: what type of pictures do I want to take, i.e., sports, landscapes, people, travel, macro, or all of the above; what are the limits of physical size that are acceptable; how are the pictures going to be used, web, prints or publication; is the camera capable of meeting my present as well as my future needs and expectations; and what am I willing to spend?

Last edited by Doug64; 08-25-18 at 01:05 PM.
Doug64 is offline  
Old 08-25-18, 11:50 AM
  #32  
str
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Spain
Posts: 1,078
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 279 Post(s)
Liked 509 Times in 246 Posts
Originally Posted by KraneXL
On the other hand, a good camera e.g. auto exposure, auto focus, face detection, high dynamic range, etc., can make even an amateur photographer look good. So long as he can at least frame a shot.

nope, it does not. a good picture still has to sell a story, an idea .... and, it has also a good composition, use of room/space.
str is offline  
Old 08-25-18, 06:51 PM
  #33  
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: La-la Land, CA
Posts: 3,622

Bikes: Cannondale Quick SL1 Bike - 2014

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3405 Post(s)
Liked 240 Times in 185 Posts
Originally Posted by str
nope, it does not. a good picture still has to sell a story, an idea .... and, it has also a good composition, use of room/space.
Ever hear of a "decisive moment?" Bresson's decisive moment where all of the above can occur naturally at the right time and with any individual. No photographic or technical knowledge necessary. All you have to do is be there to snap that picture. That's how halls get filled with award winning photographs taken by rank amateurs.
KraneXL is offline  
Old 08-25-18, 08:09 PM
  #34  
Senior Member
 
Doug64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Oregon
Posts: 6,495
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1185 Post(s)
Liked 842 Times in 438 Posts
The real challenge is to recognize the potential and to "snap that picture" at just the right time. What would Bresson's photo of the guy jumping across (into) the puddle look like if he was a half second early or a half second late? It takes more than just luck, and an automatic camera.
Doug64 is offline  
Old 08-26-18, 12:56 AM
  #35  
str
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Spain
Posts: 1,078
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 279 Post(s)
Liked 509 Times in 246 Posts
Originally Posted by KraneXL
Ever hear of a "decisive moment?" Bresson's decisive moment where all of the above can occur naturally at the right time and with any individual. No photographic or technical knowledge necessary. All you have to do is be there to snap that picture. That's how halls get filled with award winning photographs taken by rank amateurs.
yes thats sounds familiar to me ... "decisive moment" is even more difficult for a beginner.
here a little video of my work: stefan rohner - humans
all shot will Leica MP, Kodak trip 400 and printed on Agfa MCC111

3 pictures attached, more b/w work here: daily life





str is offline  
Old 08-26-18, 01:37 AM
  #36  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Down Under
Posts: 1,936

Bikes: A steel framed 26" off road tourer from a manufacturer who thinks they are cool. Giant Anthem. Trek 720 Multiroad pub bike. 10 kids bikes all under 20". Assorted waifs and unfinished projects.

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1188 Post(s)
Liked 1,154 Times in 640 Posts
Originally Posted by Bang0Bang00
Mmm, yes. The troll game is strong and funny with this one.

Seriously though - Cellphones, Go Pro, Go Pro Session, something cheap from eBay. Nikon makes a $110 waterproof point and shoot.

If you want to spend some coin, the Nikon AW-1 was pretty cool mirrorless weather (read as NOT WATER) proof crop frame camera. Pretty much anything Sony these days (5000-series on up to the A7- series). Canon and Nikon too, if you prefer traditionalé.
I've got an AW-1, it is waterproof, rated to 15m.* But the lens choice to keep that waterproofness is pretty limited...basically the standard 11-27mm zoom supplied with the camera (approximately equivalent to a 30-75mm 35mm lens)* Last time I took it touring I hardly got it out because swapping lenses was such a PITA.* It also misses out on things like an intervalometer, which is disappointing. The instruction manual is pretty useless too, working out how to manually focus was trial and error. That being said, it is tough, feels chunky in the hand...*
I've just been using my Sony Xperia Z5, the camera on that seems pretty good does low light well for such a small sensor, has a 3x optical zoom.
Trevtassie is offline  
Old 08-26-18, 09:28 AM
  #37  
Senior Member
 
Doug64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Oregon
Posts: 6,495
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1185 Post(s)
Liked 842 Times in 438 Posts
Originally Posted by str
yes thats sounds familiar to me ... "decisive moment" is even more difficult for a beginner.
here a little video of my work: stefan rohner - humans
all shot will Leica MP, Kodak trip 400 and printed on Agfa MCC111

3 pictures attached, more b/w work here: daily life
Thanks for sharing some of your work here and on your website. Very nice!

Last edited by Doug64; 08-26-18 at 01:17 PM.
Doug64 is offline  
Old 08-27-18, 10:44 PM
  #38  
41 calories/30 min typing
 
Bang0Bang00's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 97
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by str
yes thats sounds familiar to me ... "decisive moment" is even more difficult for a beginner.
here a little video of my work: stefan rohner - humans
all shot will Leica MP, Kodak trip 400 and printed on Agfa MCC111

3 pictures attached, more b/w work here: daily life





Great work!

This is proof skill, a good tool, and film can equal magic.

I'd love too see your "bad" photos, especially if you're shooting 35mm film.

From a technical perspective, nothing digital (that I've seen) can compare to well shot film. So it's a little unfair to argue the tool doesn't matter, and then whip out this phenomenal portfolio shot on 35mm.

The rest of us mere mortals are operating at some divisible factor of 35mm capturing pixels and not photons.

It's like you've got to fight a bunch of zombies, most people are slinging automatic rifles with red dot sights, fighting recoil and magazine jams, and you're a highly trained ninja slashing through the horde with a finely sharpened katana looking back at the rest of us saying,"Why are you so tired? It's not hard, just aim for the head!"

Smooth mutha clicker. Smooth.
(source for zombie argument: https://youtu.be/qQDWrQ285IM)

Last edited by Bang0Bang00; 08-27-18 at 10:57 PM.
Bang0Bang00 is offline  
Old 08-28-18, 06:51 AM
  #39  
str
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Spain
Posts: 1,078
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 279 Post(s)
Liked 509 Times in 246 Posts
thanks Doug.

thanks BangoBang ... sorry I read the name Henri Cartier Bresson
str is offline  
Old 08-28-18, 07:16 AM
  #40  
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Posts: 29,592

Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint, GT Timberline 29r, Marin Muirwoods 29er, Trek FX Alpha 7.0

Mentioned: 112 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5234 Post(s)
Liked 3,608 Times in 2,357 Posts
how about something like this?

Teepao Underwater Digital Camera 24.0MP Waterproof Dual Screen Full HD 1080P Shockproof Video Camcorder Point and Shoot Self Shot Camera with Flash Light (Blue)
rumrunn6 is offline  
Old 08-28-18, 08:21 AM
  #41  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 13,238
Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2745 Post(s)
Liked 979 Times in 801 Posts
Originally Posted by str
thanks Doug.

thanks BangoBang ... sorry I read the name Henri Cartier Bresson
moi aussi
djb is offline  
Old 09-01-18, 11:12 AM
  #42  
Senior Member
 
davester's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Berkeley CA
Posts: 2,543

Bikes: 1981 Ron Cooper, 1974 Cinelli Speciale Corsa, 2000 Gary Fisher Sugar 1, 1986 Miyata 710, 1982 Raleigh "International"

Mentioned: 98 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 936 Post(s)
Liked 1,328 Times in 492 Posts
I thought long and hard about a high quality camera to take cycling and hiking and ended up with a Panasonic Lumix GM5. It's the smallest Micro four thirds camera there is, has great AF, a great UI, interchangeable lenses (and a huge selection of lenses available) and to top it off a real viewfinder. Unfortunately they are getting a little hard to find since Panasonic seems to be phasing them out due to relatively low demand (too many folks didn't want to pay a premium price for such a small camera). However, you I love this camera. The kit 12-32 (24-64 35mm equiv) is really nice but I usually ride with the minuscule f2.5 14mm pancake attached so that I don't have to open up the lens and can shoot while rolling.

davester is offline  
Old 09-01-18, 04:51 PM
  #43  
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: La-la Land, CA
Posts: 3,622

Bikes: Cannondale Quick SL1 Bike - 2014

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3405 Post(s)
Liked 240 Times in 185 Posts
Originally Posted by Bang0Bang00
Great work!

This is proof skill, a good tool, and film can equal magic.

I'd love too see your "bad" photos, especially if you're shooting 35mm film.

From a technical perspective, nothing digital (that I've seen) can compare to well shot film. So it's a little unfair to argue the tool doesn't matter, and then whip out this phenomenal portfolio shot on 35mm.

The rest of us mere mortals are operating at some divisible factor of 35mm capturing pixels and not photons.

It's like you've got to fight a bunch of zombies, most people are slinging automatic rifles with red dot sights, fighting recoil and magazine jams, and you're a highly trained ninja slashing through the horde with a finely sharpened katana looking back at the rest of us saying,"Why are you so tired? It's not hard, just aim for the head!"

Smooth mutha clicker. Smooth.
(source for zombie argument: https://youtu.be/qQDWrQ285IM)
Who said the tool doesn't matter? In fact, it varies. Sometimes its critical, other times it's insignificant: A photo of a crick in the pavement won't look any more spectacular from a Hasselblad as it would if you used a Polaroid point-and-shoot.
KraneXL is offline  
Old 09-01-18, 07:22 PM
  #44  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 13,238
Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2745 Post(s)
Liked 979 Times in 801 Posts
and as someone who worked in commercial photography long before the digital age, during the transition, and after film was dead, and who spent half my life in the b+w darkroom , I can reliably say that digital has gone well past film now far ages and ages.
Yes, there is a diff, but the tonal range and colour rendition of cameras, as well as the processing software, doesnt make much of a difference any more.

In the end, a camera is a tool, and diff cameras and levels of cameras have diff characteristics, and while some technical aspects come into play, it still comes down to shooting well, both from an aesthetic point of view, as well as a technical one.

but hey, we are talking about cameras to take on a bike trip, with the restraints of weight, size, wanting or not wanting to take an object of X value on a bike etc etc.
djb is offline  
Old 09-01-18, 08:06 PM
  #45  
don't try this at home.
 
rm -rf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: N. KY
Posts: 5,971
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 986 Post(s)
Liked 526 Times in 361 Posts
Originally Posted by davester
I thought long and hard about a high quality camera to take cycling and hiking and ended up with a Panasonic Lumix GM5. It's the smallest Micro four thirds camera there is, has great AF, a great UI, interchangeable lenses (and a huge selection of lenses available) and to top it off a real viewfinder. Unfortunately they are getting a little hard to find since Panasonic seems to be phasing them out due to relatively low demand (too many folks didn't want to pay a premium price for such a small camera). However, you I love this camera. The kit 12-32 (24-64 35mm equiv) is really nice but I usually ride with the minuscule f2.5 14mm pancake attached so that I don't have to open up the lens and can shoot while rolling.

I have the similar sized Panasonic LX100. Since the 24-70 equivalent F1.7-2.8 zoom is built-in, it's probably smaller than your removable zoom lens setup.

It takes very good photos, especially in low light. And the results with raw files instead of jpgs is a lot better.

Riding with an enthusiast camera
I've brought it on rides, but it needs a small handlebar bag. And it's not dustproof or water resistant, so I need to be careful with it. My inexpensive handlebar bag makes it easy to unzip the bag, pull out the camera, and shoot. But I rarely do this while riding, I almost always stop.

Taking the time to get a reasonably good photo adds up during the day. I'll only bring it occasionally, when I have time to stop and shoot. These solo photography rides have a lot of stopping along the way. The few times I've brought it but only shot at rest stops, I was usually sorry that I skipped a lot of the good stuff along the way.

Perhaps a weather resistant, more rugged camera could stay on one of those shoulder strap rigs that holds the camera out of the way, but allows it to still be accessible. Not good in a crash, though.

Pocketable
I still have an old Canon SD800 that I used a lot on rides, before I got a waterproof smart phone. I bring it occasionally on group rides. The main advantage is that I can pull it out of my jersey pocket, hit the power button, and 2 seconds later take a set of photos without looking. It's photos are kind of fuzzy and lower res compared to contemporary cameras, but it's fast and doesn't make me stop riding. There's lots of dud photos with this technique, but enough usable ones that just need a little straightening and cropping.

This shooting while riding gets a lot of photos that would never be taken if I had to stop.

A modern water resistant pocketable camera would be very convenient. While riding, I can't comfortably pull out my Galaxy S5, swipe the start screen to launch the photo app, then click on the app to take pictures -- I need to look at the screen.

the antique SD800:

Last edited by rm -rf; 09-01-18 at 08:11 PM.
rm -rf is offline  
Old 09-01-18, 08:56 PM
  #46  
Senior Member
 
Doug64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Oregon
Posts: 6,495
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1185 Post(s)
Liked 842 Times in 438 Posts
posted by rm -rf:
Taking the time to get a reasonably good photo adds up during the day. I'll only bring it occasionally, when I have time to stop and shoot. These solo photography rides have a lot of stopping along the way. The few times I've brought it but only shot at rest stops, I was usually sorry that I skipped a lot of the good stuff along the way
We did a a rough estimate of the time we spent taking pictures on a 3-month tour that we did in 2011. Using an average of 5 hours a day of actual riding time, we estimated that we used a little over 2 weeks of riding time or the equivalent of about 600 miles, for taking photographs Photography is an integral part of bike touring for us, and that is what we love about the bike, we can stop almost any time or place we want. We still get our 5+ hours of actual riding time a day regardless of how many time we stop.

On a tour this summer we were about the same as the 3-month tour, and this one was only 2 months long. I use about a minute a picture as the average, because sometimes I was shooting at 11 frames/ second. I also used half of the actual pictures we took for calculating the estimate, because we seldom take just one shot of a subject. However, I'm thinking that my estimates are still a little on the conservative side. I can think of several instances where I spent up to an hour shooting street "events" and maybe only ended up with 15-20 shots. After editing, that number will go down to 2-4 keepers (hopefully).

Last edited by Doug64; 09-02-18 at 12:42 PM.
Doug64 is offline  
Old 09-01-18, 09:22 PM
  #47  
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: La-la Land, CA
Posts: 3,622

Bikes: Cannondale Quick SL1 Bike - 2014

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3405 Post(s)
Liked 240 Times in 185 Posts
Taking picture and riding are two separate events. You need to plan to do one or the other to do either well. Good photography needs your undivided attention.
Originally Posted by rm -rf

Pocketable
I still have an old Canon SD800 that I used a lot on rides, before I got a waterproof smart phone. I bring it occasionally on group rides. The main advantage is that I can pull it out of my jersey pocket, hit the power button, and 2 seconds later take a set of photos without looking. It's photos are kind of fuzzy and lower res compared to contemporary cameras, but it's fast and doesn't make me stop riding. There's lots of dud photos with this technique, but enough usable ones that just need a little straightening and cropping.

This shooting while riding gets a lot of photos that would never be taken if I had to stop.


A modern water resistant pocketable camera would be very convenient. While riding, I can't comfortably pull out my Galaxy S5, swipe the start screen to launch the photo app, then click on the app to take pictures -- I need to look at the screen.

the antique SD800:
I have a more recent, but still older version of the Powershot. When my Gopro was run over by a car, it became my sole portable camera. They may not be waterproof, but they're still rugged enough and easy to carry on a bike ride.

Last edited by KraneXL; 09-02-18 at 01:35 AM.
KraneXL is offline  
Old 09-01-18, 10:20 PM
  #48  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 13,238
Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2745 Post(s)
Liked 979 Times in 801 Posts
camera type non withstanding, bringing up the topic of how much time is spent shooting, and access to a camera , is a good thing to bring up.
Ive learned over the years of bike travelling, to have quick access to my camera in the handlebar bag. When I had zippered h-bags, it was even faster, often riding it partly unzipped, ready to grab the camera even while riding. The popper system on Ortlieb h-bags cant be done wtih one hand generally, so this adds a bit more time of stopping, getting it open and getting camera, but that aside, I generally take shots from the bike, ie standing with the bike. I rarely get off the bike, but it happens.
Ive tried to get the time spent to a quickly as possible, and having worked as a photographer for a long time, when I see something, I position myself and take it quickly, and dont always take multiple shots and variations--but again, while I really enjoy "looking" for good shots, its a mix of the bike adventure part, and doing the photography thing, but am aware of not wanting to take too much time stopping.

that said, its nice to stop sometimes, gives your arse and rest of your body a break, and generally I do take the time to stop and not let a shot go by, but within reason.....

Part of having the limitations of a point and shoot compared to a real camera, for me anyway, is that while I take taking photos seriously to an extent, theres a real freedom and "looseness" of using a limited camera with a given quality, and its nice NOT to be so focused on shooting--again, I did it professionally for a long time, so Im not interested in going all out and being all "photo", but just loose with what I do, and accept the limitations of what Im using.
I guess one day I'll get a much higher image quality "small" travel camera, and it will be nice, as Im sure I'll appreciate the improved image quality. Ive shot and worked with 35, med and large format, but I can live with what I use and live with its limitations, and certainly appreciate not worrying at all about my camera anymore, especially with some of the tours Ive done in the last years.
djb is offline  
Old 09-01-18, 10:45 PM
  #49  
Senior Member
 
davester's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Berkeley CA
Posts: 2,543

Bikes: 1981 Ron Cooper, 1974 Cinelli Speciale Corsa, 2000 Gary Fisher Sugar 1, 1986 Miyata 710, 1982 Raleigh "International"

Mentioned: 98 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 936 Post(s)
Liked 1,328 Times in 492 Posts
Originally Posted by rm -rf
I have the similar sized Panasonic LX100. Since the 24-70 equivalent F1.7-2.8 zoom is built-in, it's probably smaller than your removable zoom lens setup.
The LX100 was on my short list along with the Sony RX100iv. That is a really nice camera but believe it or not it is considerably larger than the GM5, especially when using a pancake prime lens.

Originally Posted by rm -rf
Taking the time to get a reasonably good photo adds up during the day. I'll only bring it occasionally, when I have time to stop and shoot. These solo photography rides have a lot of stopping along the way. The few times I've brought it but only shot at rest stops, I was usually sorry that I skipped a lot of the good stuff along the way.
True. I have been riding with the GM5 on a long strap dangling into one of my jersey pockets so that I can pull it around and shoot on the move. There are some better straps with magnetic buckles out there that would be better for this, but they're pricey. I think the LX100 may be too bulky and heavy to do this easily.

Originally Posted by rm -rf
Pocketable
I still have an old Canon SD800 that I used a lot on rides, before I got a waterproof smart phone. I bring it occasionally on group rides. The main advantage is that I can pull it out of my jersey pocket, hit the power button, and 2 seconds later take a set of photos without looking. It's photos are kind of fuzzy and lower res compared to contemporary cameras, but it's fast and doesn't make me stop riding. There's lots of dud photos with this technique, but enough usable ones that just need a little straightening and cropping.

This shooting while riding gets a lot of photos that would never be taken if I had to stop.

A modern water resistant pocketable camera would be very convenient. While riding, I can't comfortably pull out my Galaxy S5, swipe the start screen to launch the photo app, then click on the app to take pictures -- I need to look at the screen.
I also had an SD800. It was a good cam in its day but totally outclassed today. I do take moving shots with my iPhone since it's a single swipe to activate the camera. However, I should get some kind of tether since I'm sure I'm going to drop it one day.
davester is offline  
Old 09-02-18, 01:46 AM
  #50  
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: La-la Land, CA
Posts: 3,622

Bikes: Cannondale Quick SL1 Bike - 2014

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3405 Post(s)
Liked 240 Times in 185 Posts
Originally Posted by davester
The LX100 was on my short list along with the Sony RX100iv. That is a really nice camera but believe it or not it is considerably larger than the GM5, especially when using a pancake prime lens.



True. I have been riding with the GM5 on a long strap dangling into one of my jersey pockets so that I can pull it around and shoot on the move. There are some better straps with magnetic buckles out there that would be better for this, but they're pricey. I think the LX100 may be too bulky and heavy to do this easily.



I also had an SD800. It was a good cam in its day but totally outclassed today. I do take moving shots with my iPhone since it's a single swipe to activate the camera. However, I should get some kind of tether since I'm sure I'm going to drop it one day.
Which points to their limitations, and is the primary reason why they don't make good action cameras. Although iPhones (and the like) can produce excellent photo quality, their design makes them unsuitable for rugged environments, and are therefore, best relocated to more pedestrian domains.
KraneXL is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.