Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Fully loaded touring on a "vintage" XL ?

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Fully loaded touring on a "vintage" XL ?

Old 09-03-18, 05:47 AM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 428

Bikes: 92 Bridgestone xo-2 Turner Sultan

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Fully loaded touring on a "vintage" XL ?

Not sure what the definition for vintage is, but wonder if it is a good idea to go out fully loaded with a 200 pound rider on one of the classic touring bikes on an XL frame such as the;
Fuji IV,Miyata 1000,Specialized expedition,Centurion Pro Tour,Univega Gran Turismo,Schwinn Voyageur SP ?
Or is this just asking for trouble ?
1-track-mind is offline  
Old 09-03-18, 06:30 AM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota, USA
Posts: 1,257

Bikes: 2017 Salsa Carbon Mukluk frame built with XT, 2018 Kona Rove NRB build with Sram Apex 1,2008 Salsa El Mariachi, 1986 Centurion Ironman

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 286 Post(s)
Liked 100 Times in 65 Posts
I'm 180

Originally Posted by 1-track-mind
Not sure what the definition for vintage is, but wonder if it is a good idea to go out fully loaded with a 200 pound rider on one of the classic touring bikes on an XL frame such as the;
Fuji IV,Miyata 1000,Specialized expedition,Centurion Pro Tour,Univega Gran Turismo,Schwinn Voyageur SP ?
Or is this just asking for trouble ?
And I ride a 1985 Trek 720. The 720 was made for loaded touring, as were the bikes you list. What you would be asking for is not trouble, but a smooth, dependable ride.
revcp is offline  
Old 09-03-18, 06:47 AM
  #3  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 428

Bikes: 92 Bridgestone xo-2 Turner Sultan

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by revcp
And I ride a 1985 Trek 720. The 720 was made for loaded touring, as were the bikes you list. What you would be asking for is not trouble, but a smooth, dependable ride.
Thanks. I guess what I'm specifically concerned about is whether the frame would be too flexy ?
1-track-mind is offline  
Old 09-03-18, 07:08 AM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota, USA
Posts: 1,257

Bikes: 2017 Salsa Carbon Mukluk frame built with XT, 2018 Kona Rove NRB build with Sram Apex 1,2008 Salsa El Mariachi, 1986 Centurion Ironman

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 286 Post(s)
Liked 100 Times in 65 Posts
Originally Posted by 1-track-mind
Thanks. I guess what I'm specifically concerned about is whether the frame would be too flexy ?
Some say the Miyata One Thousand is flexy, while it's sport touring cousin, the Six Ten, is stiff. Others say hogwash. My 720 seems plenty stiff to me.

You're going to get answers on both sides of this divide, but nothing definitive. The answer to the question of whether a good vintage tourer is capable is an unqualified "Yes!" Once you get into more subjective things like flex (and yes, someone is liable to pull out studies or supportive data, but what I've seen is basically anecdotal), you'll have a range of answers.

The most important questions are fit and feel. What fits you best? What puts a smile on your face and makes you feel like you're 7 years old again?
revcp is offline  
Old 09-03-18, 07:15 AM
  #5  
Banned.
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Winnipeg - traffic ticket central
Posts: 1,562

Bikes: Looking for "the One"

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 322 Times in 212 Posts
Any of those bikes you cited should get you where you want to go. I don't know the failure rate due to metal fatigue on old frames but that might be a distant concern. You want it to fit you, or tailor it to fit, no matter what.
prairiepedaler is offline  
Old 09-03-18, 08:40 AM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
davester's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Berkeley CA
Posts: 2,533

Bikes: 1981 Ron Cooper, 1974 Cinelli Speciale Corsa, 2000 Gary Fisher Sugar 1, 1986 Miyata 710, 1982 Raleigh "International"

Mentioned: 97 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 929 Post(s)
Liked 1,289 Times in 486 Posts
Steel frames don't come anywhere near their yield strength during use so, barring crash damage or severe rust, metal fatigue is a complete non-issue. Aluminum or titanium frames are where you have to worry about this. Those bikes are all great, and highly coveted tourers. The only issue you might have is that most come with 27" wheels, limiting tire choice unless you convert to 700c.
davester is offline  
Old 09-03-18, 09:05 AM
  #7  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,355 Times in 862 Posts
Go for a ride, enjoy the tour.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 09-03-18, 09:12 AM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
saddlesores's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Thailand..........Nakhon Nowhere
Posts: 3,654

Bikes: inferior steel....and....noodly aluminium

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1053 Post(s)
Liked 341 Times in 229 Posts
Originally Posted by 1-track-mind
Not sure what the definition for vintage is, but wonder if it is a good idea to go out fully loaded with a 200 pound rider on one of the classic touring bikes on an XL frame such as the;
Fuji IV,Miyata 1000,Specialized expedition,Centurion Pro Tour,Univega Gran Turismo,Schwinn Voyageur SP ?
Or is this just asking for trouble ?
so do you actually own one of the vintage bikes, have access to one, or considering purchasing one?

difficult to answer a hypothetical question concerning subjective ride feel of a an unknown bike of unknown age ridden on unknown terrain.
saddlesores is offline  
Old 09-03-18, 09:27 AM
  #9  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 428

Bikes: 92 Bridgestone xo-2 Turner Sultan

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm currently riding a 1992 Bridgestone XO2, with front and rear racks and Butterfly handlebars. I love it but the bike is a little on the small side for me, so I was looking at some alternatives. I'm 62 and live in the Blue Ridge mountains so having a triple chainring is a necessity on any bike i ride.

Last edited by 1-track-mind; 09-03-18 at 09:31 AM.
1-track-mind is offline  
Old 09-03-18, 09:36 AM
  #10  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 428

Bikes: 92 Bridgestone xo-2 Turner Sultan

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
My next tour will be a hub and spoke in Northern Wales, but on a rented bike. Probably the next I will do Stateside on one of my bikes will be the gap.
1-track-mind is offline  
Old 09-03-18, 09:42 AM
  #11  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 428

Bikes: 92 Bridgestone xo-2 Turner Sultan

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm also curious about the Nishiki touring bikes. It looks like there are several models listed is touring bikes, but does anybody know the pecking order in terms of best to worst?
1-track-mind is offline  
Old 09-03-18, 11:17 AM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
McBTC's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 3,889

Bikes: 2015 22 Speed

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1543 Post(s)
Liked 51 Times in 39 Posts
Depending on where you go, things have changed so much you run the risk of damaging a wheel and having a difficult time replacing it at a LBS...
McBTC is offline  
Old 09-03-18, 11:22 AM
  #13  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 428

Bikes: 92 Bridgestone xo-2 Turner Sultan

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by McBTC
Depending on where you go, things have changed so much you run the risk of damaging a wheel and having a difficult time replacing it at a LBS...
good point. That's one of the nice things about my ex 02... 26 inch wheels.
1-track-mind is offline  
Old 09-03-18, 12:11 PM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
davester's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Berkeley CA
Posts: 2,533

Bikes: 1981 Ron Cooper, 1974 Cinelli Speciale Corsa, 2000 Gary Fisher Sugar 1, 1986 Miyata 710, 1982 Raleigh "International"

Mentioned: 97 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 929 Post(s)
Liked 1,289 Times in 486 Posts
Originally Posted by McBTC
Depending on where you go, things have changed so much you run the risk of damaging a wheel and having a difficult time replacing it at a LBS...
Not that difficult. You can get reasonably priced 27" freewheel-compatible wheel sets shipped pretty much anywhere within a day or so. For most bikes you could even substitute 700c wheels if the brakes will reach.
davester is offline  
Old 09-03-18, 12:48 PM
  #15  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,355 Times in 862 Posts
Originally Posted by 1-track-mind
I'm also curious about the Nishiki touring bikes. It looks like there are several models listed is touring bikes, but does anybody know the pecking order in terms of best to worst?

Price is what usually is a hint..

I Have not been in a Nishiki Bike Dealer's shop ,
in 21 years.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 09-03-18, 03:46 PM
  #16  
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 16,605

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '88 Schwinn Premis , Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo

Mentioned: 123 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10947 Post(s)
Liked 7,474 Times in 4,181 Posts
Originally Posted by 1-track-mind
Not sure what the definition for vintage is, but wonder if it is a good idea to go out fully loaded with a 200 pound rider on one of the classic touring bikes on an XL frame such as the;
Fuji IV,Miyata 1000,Specialized expedition,Centurion Pro Tour,Univega Gran Turismo,Schwinn Voyageur SP ?
Or is this just asking for trouble ?
I weight 230 and my touring bike is a 64cm frame made by original fuji in 1990.
it rides just fine loaded up and me + gear for sure weighs more than you + gear.

taller bikes will flex more, but I don't notice anything annoying lile ghost shifting or scraping chainrings due to frame twisting when I'm out of the saddle.

with that said, it's a mix of modern and vintage components which is why i trust it. Cartridge bottom bracket, handbuilt 36h 700c wheels, and 3x9 gearing are the major changes.
good wheels make the most difference. Weak wheels are no fun.

For a handful of years I had an '80 Schwinn voyageur 11.8 that was fun to ride, but flexed. That was more of a sport touring bile though.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 09-03-18, 06:41 PM
  #17  
Bikes are okay, I guess.
 
thumpism's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Posts: 6,938

Bikes: Waterford Paramount Touring, Giant CFM-2, Raleigh Sports 3-speeds in M23 & L23, Schwinn Cimarron oddball build, Marin Palisades Trail dropbar conversion, Nishiki Cresta GT

Mentioned: 69 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2647 Post(s)
Liked 2,446 Times in 1,557 Posts
You should be fine on any of those bikes. I'm 67 (until next week) and have always ridden tall frames, 25" on my early tours and a 62cm Bridgestone RB-T most recently. Flex can be an issue so take your loaded panniers along for the test ride.
thumpism is offline  
Old 09-03-18, 07:09 PM
  #18  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 14
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
1981 Trek 720

I am on the completely opposite extreme: I weight 138 pounds and ride a 19.5 inch 1981 Trek 720. I had it reworked as a triple and rode it fully loaded-about 38 pounds in 4 panniers- around Lake Michigan last summer and Lake Erie this summer - on 25 mm tires at 110 psi - contrary to all talk about wider tires at lower pressures. I had the time of my life- no problems- other than being on the lookout for bike stores with a presta pump. I just don't have the arm strength to push more than 70 psi into my tires. The bike handles beautifully. However, I don't know if the frame and wheels could handle your weight plus the packs and baggage. Perhaps someone on the board can speak to that. But I would not trade this bike for a Surly LHT and feel fortunate to have landed into this old Trek.
HGuthertz is offline  
Old 09-03-18, 08:29 PM
  #19  
Bikes are okay, I guess.
 
thumpism's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Posts: 6,938

Bikes: Waterford Paramount Touring, Giant CFM-2, Raleigh Sports 3-speeds in M23 & L23, Schwinn Cimarron oddball build, Marin Palisades Trail dropbar conversion, Nishiki Cresta GT

Mentioned: 69 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2647 Post(s)
Liked 2,446 Times in 1,557 Posts
By "flex" I meant the tendency for some loaded touring bikes to develop a disconcerting shimmy or wobble on fast descents, the ones on which you do not want such a distraction. My first experience with it was on a 25" Batavus with handlebar bag and rear panniers, the second on a 25.5" Trek 710 with the same bag setup and the third on the 62cm RB-T with four panniers plus HB bag. I was handily under 200 pounds at those times and touring load was 30-50 pounds. I don't hear other tourists complain about this but I can't believe I'm the only person to have experienced it.
thumpism is offline  
Old 09-04-18, 03:27 AM
  #20  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 428

Bikes: 92 Bridgestone xo-2 Turner Sultan

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by thumpism
By "flex" I meant the tendency for some loaded touring bikes to develop a disconcerting shimmy or wobble on fast descents, the ones on which you do not want such a distraction. My first experience with it was on a 25" Batavus with handlebar bag and rear panniers, the second on a 25.5" Trek 710 with the same bag setup and the third on the 62cm RB-T with four panniers plus HB bag. I was handily under 200 pounds at those times and touring load was 30-50 pounds. I don't hear other tourists complain about this but I can't believe I'm the only person to have experienced it.
Good to know. It seems like every time I read about this issue, Trek's name pops up, but not with 520's. It sounds like Fuji might be my best option and they are more readily available than the others.
1-track-mind is offline  
Old 09-04-18, 05:22 AM
  #21  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota, USA
Posts: 1,257

Bikes: 2017 Salsa Carbon Mukluk frame built with XT, 2018 Kona Rove NRB build with Sram Apex 1,2008 Salsa El Mariachi, 1986 Centurion Ironman

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 286 Post(s)
Liked 100 Times in 65 Posts
Not an issue with my Trek 720

Originally Posted by 1-track-mind
Good to know. It seems like every time I read about this issue, Trek's name pops up, but not with 520's. It sounds like Fuji might be my best option and they are more readily available than the others.
No wobble at all descending with 4 panniers, probably 35 lbs + rider @ 180 lbs.
revcp is offline  
Old 09-04-18, 05:59 AM
  #22  
Overdoing projects
 
JaccoW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Rotterdam, former republic of the Netherlands
Posts: 2,397

Bikes: Batavus Randonneur GL, Gazelle Orange Excellent, Gazelle Super Licht, Gazelle Grand Tourist, Gazelle Lausanne, Gazelle Tandem, Koga-Miyata SilverAce, Koga-Miyata WorldTraveller

Mentioned: 58 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 784 Post(s)
Liked 1,238 Times in 686 Posts


Batavus Randonneur GL 64cm frame. Slight wobble when I take my hands off the wheel with front bag (less with panniers on the front).
JaccoW is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 07:03 PM
  #23  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 3,473
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 363 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 22 Posts
Originally Posted by thumpism
By "flex" I meant the tendency for some loaded touring bikes to develop a disconcerting shimmy or wobble on fast descents... with handlebar bag and rear panniers, the second same bag setup and the third on the 62cm RB-T with four panniers plus HB bag...
Try ditching the bar bag. True some bikes do just have shimmy at high speed, but myself and many others have found bar bags(the heavier the worse) to cause it on bikes that otherwise wouldn’t have a problem. A lot of weight on top of a rear rack will also make the bike more prone to shimmy.
3speed is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 07:25 PM
  #24  
Firm but gentle
 
venturi95's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Oregon
Posts: 588

Bikes: 2005 Litespeed Tuscany, Soma Pescadero, Pure Cycles disc road, Jamis hybrid

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 159 Post(s)
Liked 104 Times in 60 Posts
Originally Posted by 1-track-mind
Not sure what the definition for vintage is, but wonder if it is a good idea to go out fully loaded with a 200 pound rider on one of the classic touring bikes on an XL frame such as the;
Fuji IV,Miyata 1000,Specialized expedition,Centurion Pro Tour,Univega Gran Turismo,Schwinn Voyageur SP ?
Or is this just asking for trouble ?
It is almost always a good idea to go out touring! I had a new 83 Trek 720 and much later picked up a 520 and converted it to 700c. I also have a early ‘80s Miyata mountain bike. I have done a good of loaded touring on all of them, and I think they are all worthy rides. I was hoping the Miyata would prove more rigid than it is under load, because it is a lot of Chromemolly that is tough as heck. They are all blown away by my Soma Saga, you can’t beat modern engineering, a tube’s stiffness is determined by its diameter, and the Saga just shirks off extra weight. Rack stiffness also plays a huge role here.
venturi95 is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 09:18 PM
  #25  
Bikes are okay, I guess.
 
thumpism's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Posts: 6,938

Bikes: Waterford Paramount Touring, Giant CFM-2, Raleigh Sports 3-speeds in M23 & L23, Schwinn Cimarron oddball build, Marin Palisades Trail dropbar conversion, Nishiki Cresta GT

Mentioned: 69 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2647 Post(s)
Liked 2,446 Times in 1,557 Posts
Originally Posted by 3speed

Try ditching the bar bag. True some bikes do just have shimmy at high speed, but myself and many others have found bar bags(the heavier the worse) to cause it on bikes that otherwise wouldn’t have a problem. A lot of weight on top of a rear rack will also make the bike more prone to shimmy.
Great idea, but when touring the capacity is sometimes essential. If I decide to investigate further I have a handy long hill and can try descents with various bag configurations on the bike(s), but I don't know if I'm up for climbing back up that many times.
thumpism is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.