Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Training plan for double century in August?

Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Training plan for double century in August?

Reply

Old 02-08-19, 11:17 AM
  #1  
Skankingbiker
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Skankingbiker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 371

Bikes: AllCity Nature Boy, On-one Pompino) , Fuji Roubaix road bike, Ninder EMD, Voodoo Hoodoo MTB, Surly Pugsley/Krampug

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 39 Post(s)
Training plan for double century in August?

I am considering doing the Ride Across Wisconsin in August--2 day double century I missed most of last season due to a back injury. I am at a total loss as far as training regimens. I don't want to do too much too soon, but know I have a lot of work to do.

Anyone have any suggestions, ideas?
Skankingbiker is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-19, 07:37 PM
  #2  
Machka 
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,175

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 118 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2754 Post(s)
Back to back centuries - 100 miles each day?

Or a double century - 200 miles in one day?

Or back to back double centuries - 200 miles each day?
Machka is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-19, 08:49 PM
  #3  
mev
bicycle tourist
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
Posts: 1,568

Bikes: Trek 520, Lightfoot Ranger, Trek 4500

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 179 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Back to back centuries - 100 miles each day?

Or a double century - 200 miles in one day?

Or back to back double centuries - 200 miles each day?
From the website (https://www.rideacrosswisconsin.com/ride-overview/) it looks like a 225 mile route which is done either in one day, or in two days of 135 miles + 90 miles. Also looks like a supported ride with transport of luggage. I assume OP is thinking of the two-day option.

I don't have a complete training plan, but in general on something like this, I like to work up to rides of 60% of the distance, i.e. 60% x 135 ~= 80 miles in advance to make sure I'm going to be comfortable with two days of riding and I'd take the weekend immediately before somewhat easy. I would also take advantage of long hours of daylight to avoid having to push it too hard on the ride.
mev is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-19, 12:23 PM
  #4  
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 2,911
Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1084 Post(s)
I don't know a specific training plan perse but for a summer trip I did a few years ago I followed a conditioning regime that started in the spring. Much of it to get used to spending long hours in the saddle
  • Because I work Mon-Fri I rode to work each day just to get saddle time (15km)
  • One or two times a week I would take the long way home and stretch it to an hour or so of riding.
  • On the weekends I would select a day route that gradually increased the distance starting from say 30 - 100km's. That became my relaxing day of bike touring. Fortunately I live in a great place with a lot of variety.
  • Then I began increasing the difficulty of those day rides by adding hills. 1 hour away I have access to 3 mountain passes and a coastal hwy. I tried to make it fun by inviting friends along for some of them.
First:
Then:


Working up to this:
Happy Feet is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-19, 02:08 PM
  #5  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 39,628

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 167 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6190 Post(s)
More appropriate feedback in this section , than Pleasure touring, I'd say ..https://www.bikeforums.net/long-dist...rance-cycling/

Touring , not unusual to take 3 days to enjoy the scenery over those 200 miles , stopping for a nice lunch each day , etc.







..
fietsbob is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-19, 02:44 PM
  #6  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 21,458
Mentioned: 146 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7817 Post(s)
I'd encourage you to do as much saddle time as possible.

A century a month?

There were a couple of other people on BikeForums that are interested in that ride.

Century vs. Double: what's the difference?

@wipekitty , @srode1 , @rhm

Perhaps you can find a training/riding buddy.

I've hit 200 miles a few times. Not much more. One of the issues I foresee is that there is apparently a 16.5 hour time limit. Unless it is organized to get a strong tail wind, that would definitely be a challenge for me (which is also a reason to do it with a group)
CliffordK is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-19, 05:47 PM
  #7  
srode1
Gravel Rocks
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Ohio
Posts: 133

Bikes: Trek Domane and Crockett, Niner RLT9

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Curious how fit you were before the back problems? That will have a big impact on how fast you can get back to shape for a double. I'd just start with 1 hour rides at an endurance pace to see how much you can tolerate, then start going longer, then a couple blocks of Temp intervals, then Steady State, then adding long rides on weekends to the Steady State intervals, so you have a long ride right after your intervals. Long ride work up to 4 hours or so.
srode1 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-19, 06:24 PM
  #8  
Riveting
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 384

Bikes: '13 Trek Madone 2.3, '13 Diamondback Hybrid Commuter, '17 Spec Roubaix Di2, '17 Spec Camber 29'er

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 129 Post(s)
Back-to-back centuries (with a significant sleep in the middle) shouldn't be referred to as a double century. But if the sleep duration is much shorter than normal, like only a 60-120 minute nap, then maybe. I have several rando friends who do those nutty 1200km rides in under 90 hours with just a few 2-4 hours sleeps, and it's considered one ride.

I prepared for my first double century by riding a century every other weekend, prior to the double, as well as a back to back 150 mile ride. But the double century was also a trainer for the triple century I did 2 weeks later (325 miles in 24 hours, with no sleep). The best preparation I did was to get professionally fit to the right saddle!
Riveting is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-19, 06:13 AM
  #9  
wipekitty
on the road again
 
wipekitty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: organic valley
Posts: 1,776

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 472 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Skankingbiker View Post
I am considering doing the Ride Across Wisconsin in August--2 day double century I missed most of last season due to a back injury. I am at a total loss as far as training regimens. I don't want to do too much too soon, but know I have a lot of work to do.

Anyone have any suggestions, ideas?
Are you doing the two day version? (I am indeed signed up for the one day version.)

I'm not sure where you are in Wisconsin, but there is a RAW info session at a LBS in La Crosse coming up in March. Part of the presentation will apparently discuss a training plan...and there is also information on training plans on the official website. It looks like the training plan for the two day version recommends a few centuries and a few 200 mile+ weeks (whereas the one day plan recommends a few significantly longer rides, plus a few 300 mile+ weeks.) The good news is that it starts off in late March with only around 40 miles a week, so even if you hit two hours a week on a bike or trainer until then, it should be fairly easy.

Some of the guys around La Crosse are planning to do training rides once summer hits, and I suspect that there will be other training rides taking place elsewhere in Wisconsin.
wipekitty is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-19, 06:49 AM
  #10  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 21,458
Mentioned: 146 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7817 Post(s)
How is the back?

You might also consider recumbents and various aero and racing recumbents.
CliffordK is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-19, 01:09 PM
  #11  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 39,628

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 167 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6190 Post(s)
True, a Velomobile is a fully streamlined tadpole recumbent .trike, a lawn chair with pedals , inside a bubble with smooth airflow around it..

1st place finisher in the Transamerica tour - race, rode on/in one .. last summer..

fietsbob is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-19, 05:25 AM
  #12  
jpescatore
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Ashton, MD USA
Posts: 328

Bikes: Trek Domane SL6 Disc, Trek 520

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 98 Post(s)
I'm going to do the Seattle to Portland ride this year as a 2 day 203 mile ride. I haven't done back to back centuries in 30 years (I'm 62 now) but have done 3-4 day touring rides where the 2 day mileage was pretty close to that, and here is what has worked for me in the past:

I'm normally getting in one long ride (50 - 65 miles) on the weekends and 1-2 shorter (20-30 miles) during the week after work or at lunch, when all the weather/work/family gods cooperate - I keep doing that. I try to make the longer rides be hillier every other week - that increases time in the saddle and I think hills are where I make my fitness gains. I do 90% solo rides, and the occasional group ride and I can do 60 mile rides with 2,000 feet of climbing or 4,000+ feet of climbing around here.

Then, I have two opportunities to do 75 and 85 mile rides to friend's houses and whenever I do one of those, I try to do another ride the next day. That seems to help.

I've tried several times to do one of those Century training plans, but I've never been able to stick to it. I now do a lot of Zwift riding over the winter and on rainy days during the summer - throwing in some high intensity intervals on there also seems to help.

Not trying to claim I'm fast - this past fall I did the completely flat Salisbury MD centruy in just under 6 hours and that was my fastest time for a century ever. But, I've always finished the second day before they sent out the search and rescue teams!
jpescatore is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-19, 04:10 PM
  #13  
Skankingbiker
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Skankingbiker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 371

Bikes: AllCity Nature Boy, On-one Pompino) , Fuji Roubaix road bike, Ninder EMD, Voodoo Hoodoo MTB, Surly Pugsley/Krampug

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 39 Post(s)
Originally Posted by srode1 View Post
Curious how fit you were before the back problems? That will have a big impact on how fast you can get back to shape for a double. I'd just start with 1 hour rides at an endurance pace to see how much you can tolerate, then start going longer, then a couple blocks of Temp intervals, then Steady State, then adding long rides on weekends to the Steady State intervals, so you have a long ride right after your intervals. Long ride work up to 4 hours or so.
Slow and steady Clyde. A few 100+ mile gravel events. 40-50 mile weekend rides----before injury
Skankingbiker is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-19, 04:11 PM
  #14  
Skankingbiker
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Skankingbiker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 371

Bikes: AllCity Nature Boy, On-one Pompino) , Fuji Roubaix road bike, Ninder EMD, Voodoo Hoodoo MTB, Surly Pugsley/Krampug

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 39 Post(s)
Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
How is the back?

You might also consider recumbents and various aero and racing recumbents.
Actually planning to do it on a recumbent due to back issue. My question was more just general conditioning. Don't want to do too much too soon.
Skankingbiker is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-19, 04:36 PM
  #15  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 21,458
Mentioned: 146 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7817 Post(s)
You're planning on doing a pair of back to back centuries, I think.

I'm not sure if it is good or bad for the body in general, but it sure can be hard to do a hard effort one day, then wake up and do a hard effort the following day.

As it starts warming up a bit this spring, perhaps try a couple of century rides, either organized, or on your own. Then try getting up at the crack of dawn the next day, and heading out and doing another 20 or 30 miles.

I presume that it would be good training to occasionally do successive hard efforts. Don't let the body always fully recover.

Of course, take care of that back!!
CliffordK is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service