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Old 02-16-19, 11:36 AM
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downtubebshifter

hi

i only see one pic of touring bike with downtube shifter...
i wonder if people are missing out?

bar ends just looks vulnerable. dt cleaner...dt better pritected.

i thinking of getting a 32mm french DT shifter mount from ebay.

anyone know if French clamp mount will work with Shimao shifters?

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Old 02-16-19, 11:50 AM
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So its about appearance not function for you .. ?


French clamp mount will work with Shimao shifters?
Probably not ... you mean a band clamp for 28.0mm tubing?


had DT shifters for a few months* on my touring bike 30 + years ago, bar end shifters ever since ..

its about keeping both hands on the bars for control of a bag bearing bike.



you just having a touring bike, not going on a touring fortnight holiday?


* sun tour friction ratchet, a quick slap was sufficient for a single cog switch..

1957 I built a 3 by 3 by 3 ; 27 speed it had 3 Huret friction levers on the down tube , but I was not camping touring on it..





..


...

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Old 02-16-19, 11:58 AM
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yes, band clamp vintage French.

seller claim it fit 28 to 32mm tubeing.
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Old 02-16-19, 12:06 PM
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I've used bar end shifter for years on my touring bike and never had any issues. If you're touring with a heavy load reaching for a downtube shifter could become dicey in the handling department which is not something you want on a heavily loaded touring bike, you would be surprise as to how fast things can get out of control trying to shift with one hand and steer with the other when there's extra weight involved.

I wouldn't go with a French shifter, they did make a nice shifter, but if something goes wrong on a tour a bike shop will NOT have any spare parts for it, best to go with brand new Shimano Dura Ace barends, any parts if ever needed are much more readily available; recently SRAM got into the barend action too, but those are more for tri racing and not for touring like the DA, plus the DA has that beautiful vintage look. I forgot, Microshift has them as well, but they do not use replaceable parts so if they go bad you have to buy a whole new shifter.

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Old 02-16-19, 12:59 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
yes, band clamp vintage French.

seller claim it fit 28 to 32mm tubeing.
Maybe.

I really do not like downtube shifters, but started using bar end shifters in the 1980s.

That said, when I built up a rando bike a couple years ago I used a brifter for the rear, but I did not have a brifter to use for the front shifter. For temporary purposes, I fitted a vintage Huret downtube lever on the bike. It was intended to be temporary, but I still have the downtube shifter for the front on the bike three years later.

You said French, but did not list a brand. Huret and Simplex were the two common ones.

Make sure that the seller includes all bolts. The Huret wingnut used a different thread than the frame mount, thus I could not use the Huret Wingnut. That is why the wingnut in the photo says Suntour. I do not know what the thread pattern in the Huret mount was, but it was not an M5 thread.


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Old 02-16-19, 01:00 PM
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i had campy dts on my mercian. 50k km and no problems. except that cat. simple and reliable.


like the look of these:
https://www.amazon.com/DIA-COMPE-8-1...ateway&sr=8-19


but you'll need a clamp:
https://www.amazon.com/SUNXCD-Shifte...ateway&sr=8-33
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Old 02-16-19, 02:51 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
hi

i only see one pic of touring bike with downtube shifter...
i wonder if people are missing out?
I ain't missing out. Have used every type of shift thingy ever made including Campy. My conclusion: Flat bars = GripShift, Drop bars = Downtube. In the photo is my current bike with Dura-Ace downtube shifters. Simple, dependable, crash proof. Many will argue no doubt. If I raced, my opinion would be different.

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Old 02-16-19, 04:30 PM
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I have a bike with downtube shifters and I hate them. Dangerous and hard to reach. However Gevenalle makes a nice solution to the issue by putting them on the front of brake levers. Also IRD does a similar version and there are still companies producing quill stem mounted shifters or go with a single speed and don't bother shifting. I have used bar end shifters on my Disc Trucker and had no major issues with them but probably wouldn't spec them again unless I was building something retro or maybe was using a non drop bar.
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Old 02-16-19, 05:11 PM
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had no idea Lht came with Dt shift.
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Old 02-16-19, 05:24 PM
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You can buy a downtube shifter clamp from Problem Solvers.
On my last touring bike of ~20yrs I used Sunrace downtube shifters, not one problem in 20 yrs of abuse.
I'm resigned to the fact that whatever new bike I get will have some type of fancy brake shifter thing.
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Old 02-16-19, 05:27 PM
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i like the less cluttering of cables.
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Old 02-16-19, 05:28 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
had no idea Lht came with Dt shift.

they don't, but they have the braze on fitting that has the adapter screwed over it.. so buyer can retrofit them on, their own..
From surly website :

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Old 02-16-19, 06:16 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
had no idea Lht came with Dt shift.
For first several years, truckers came as frame and fork only. Later the complete bike option was created. And some time after that the disc option was added too. But a lot of LHT were built up from the frame.

The one in the photo in post 7 looks like the original sage green color. Mine was that color and mine was first year of production, 2004. At that time, all LHT were sold as frame and fork only. You put the parts on the frame that you wanted.
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Old 02-16-19, 06:21 PM
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I should clarify that in post number 5 above where I was talking about a Huret downtube shifter, I did the opposite of what you are currently proposing. I used a vintage friction shift lever (French) on a modern downtube shifter mount. But you are proposing to put a modern shift lever on a vintage French mount. What you are proposing might or might not work.

Do any of the older bike shops in your community have a bin or bucket of antique parts in the back that you can sort through? If so, you might find a complete downtube shifter set with clamp.
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Old 02-16-19, 07:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
...a lot of LHT were built up from the frame.
Mine in the photo with the downtube shifters came as a bare frame. I picked the parts.

Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
The one in the photo in post 7 looks like the original sage green color.
I missed the Sage Green by one year. Mine was branded "Olive". Bike in the front (on the left) belongs to a bud. His is Sage. Mine on the right is a tad darker. You should be able to tell in this photo. He went with brifters, as most people have been doing for many years now.


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Old 02-16-19, 07:17 PM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
I have a bike with downtube shifters and I hate them. Dangerous and hard to reach. However Gevenalle makes a nice solution to the issue by putting them on the front of brake levers. Also IRD does a similar version and there are still companies producing quill stem mounted shifters or go with a single speed and don't bother shifting. I have used bar end shifters on my Disc Trucker and had no major issues with them but probably wouldn't spec them again unless I was building something retro or maybe was using a non drop bar.
I do tend to agree with what you say about downtube shifters. I had a road bike for several years that had them, and they do come a bit risky when climbing and in moving in traffic situations when there is a need for shifting and braking.

The beauty of them does line in the simplicity of the mechanism, which even beats handlebar shifters of similar type. But the position change to reach them can become a nuisance. And it didn't hep that I road a 200km randonnee in the company of a downtube shifter guy who simply couldn't be bothered getting the adjustment right and eliminate the noise from the rear gears all day.

I have toured on a single-speed fixed-gear bike (and ridden it a fair bit in long daily distances) and still find it much better except on really steep climbs (and there is a solution to that, I think, in fitting up a rear hub that has threads on both sides for single gears).
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Old 02-16-19, 07:29 PM
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DTS, Bar Ends, Brifters and of course, Thumb Shifters.
It's pretty hard to beat the simplicity of these.

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Old 02-16-19, 07:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
I do tend to agree with what you say about downtube shifters. I had a road bike for several years that had them, and they do come a bit risky when climbing and in moving in traffic situations when there is a need for shifting and braking.
Downtube shifters are for people who can spin like mad AND push a gear two sizes too tall for the situation. If you can do this, and your gearing is correct, you just don't have to shift as much - you "make due" with the gear you picked until you break free of traffic or whatever situation keeps both hands on the bars. Or you learn to think ahead better. Or you become a better bike rider.

I had a Campy 11-Speed road bike with Chorus brifters. I shifted that thing like a Grand Prix race car around town. On my touring bike with 9-speed downtube shifters, I hardly shift at all under the same conditions. I just make up for not shifting by spinning high RPMs, or grinding a big gear for a minute. It won't kill you.

If you race, and win money racing...brifters 100% no argument. For a multitude of reasons. Grinding up a pass in Rocky Mountain National Park on a tour for two hours straight? You won't be shifting much. Dropping down the other side of the pass at 30mph for 20 minutes? You wont be shifting much either. Crossing Kansas 8-hours a day for a week. Yep...you won't be shifting much. Shouldn't be in a rush anyway.

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Old 02-17-19, 05:14 AM
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One point that a lot of people miss is that when downtube shifters were common, bikes usually had five or six sprockets on the freewheel and almost always had a double crank. If you only have a total of 10 or 12 gears, you are not going to shift as often as you would if you have a more modern choice of a lot more gears.

And as JoeyBike mentioned, you are more likely to make do or anticipate shifting better when using downtube shifters. Part of the reason for that was that shifting was often slower then because the shifters were friction instead of indexed, the sprockets and chainrings were not ramped and pinned, and the components were often manufactured to less stringent tolerances than today.

Back in those days when most bikes had downtube shifters, there was a reason that touring bikes often used bar end shifters instead, if you were touring there would be times when you would want to have both hands on the handlebars when you shifted the gears.

Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
hi

i only see one pic of touring bike with downtube shifter...
i wonder if people are missing out?

bar ends just looks vulnerable. dt cleaner...dt better pritected.

i thinking of getting a 32mm french DT shifter mount from ebay.

anyone know if French clamp mount will work with Shimao shifters?
But, if for some reason you really want to use drop bar shifters, go ahead.
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Old 02-17-19, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
One point that a lot of people miss is that when downtube shifters were common, bikes usually had five or six sprockets on the freewheel and almost always had a double crank. If you only have a total of 10 or 12 gears, you are not going to shift as often as you would if you have a more modern choice of a lot more gears.
Also, in the beginning with friction downtube shifters, they were not indexed. No clicks. Smooth shifting which took some skill to overshift a tad, then carefully center the rear derailleur over the chosen cog until it was silent. Of course with practice it became automatic. I remember my first real touring bike had 6-speed shifter with index, and for the life of me I couldn't understand why. Clicks meant more adjustments had to be made initially, and as the cables stretched, to make sure the chain centered on every cog. With friction I could make that adjustment in the saddle on the fly with a tweak of the shift lever.

Thank God the front derailleur was not indexed! I still hate that. My Trucker in the photo has a non-indexed front derailleur shifter.

I believe that index shifting was created to make it easier for "novice" cyclists to ride geared bikes. Of course now I am happy to use indexed shifting on the rear cog. If I cycled with ear buds, indexed shifting would take on a whole new meaning as well! But I do not.

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Old 02-17-19, 11:42 AM
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Originally Posted by JoeyBike View Post
Also, in the beginning with friction downtube shifters, they were not indexed. No clicks. Smooth shifting which took some skill to overshift a tad, then carefully center the rear derailleur over the chosen cog until it was silent. Of course with practice it became automatic. I remember my first real touring bike had 6-speed shifter with index, and for the life of me I couldn't understand why. Clicks meant more adjustments had to be made initially, and as the cables stretched, to make sure the chain centered on every cog. With friction I could make that adjustment in the saddle on the fly with a tweak of the shift lever.

Thank God the front derailleur was not indexed! I still hate that. My Trucker in the photo has a non-indexed front derailleur shifter.

I believe that index shifting was created to make it easier for "novice" cyclists to ride geared bikes. Of course now I am happy to use indexed shifting on the rear cog. If I cycled with ear buds, indexed shifting would take on a whole new meaning as well! But I do not.
I put a cheap friction stem shifter once on my commuter mtb. It was easy to use, IMO. After short time, it was easy to perfect shifting.

Only problem was that when I go over pot holes, sometimes, it would change gear automatically. That that drove me mad.

Not sure if that happens to all friction shifter or if it was just this cheapy one I had.
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Old 02-17-19, 12:51 PM
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Practice

You can take my two cents with a grain of salt as I have hauled any gear with downtube shifters.

my first road bike (1983 fuji del rey) I rode for a few years. The downtube shifting was very awkward to start. However, after the first 6 months to a year I got really good with them. Initially your balance is off when trying to shift (especially when climbing). But with practice it wasn't an issue. I would assume it would be the same when adding a load to the bike. Just have to ride it and ride it to improve and get comfortable to the different weight distribution.
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Old 02-17-19, 02:06 PM
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Originally Posted by MiE View Post
You can take my two cents with a grain of salt as I have hauled any gear with downtube shifters.

my first road bike (1983 fuji del rey) I rode for a few years. The downtube shifting was very awkward to start. However, after the first 6 months to a year I got really good with them. Initially your balance is off when trying to shift (especially when climbing). But with practice it wasn't an issue. I would assume it would be the same when adding a load to the bike. Just have to ride it and ride it to improve and get comfortable to the different weight distribution.
You are correct. I have toured on bikes with downtube shifters since 1975 almost exclusively. I still use them but of course the rear shifter is index now. All 5 of my USA crossings were cycled with downtube shifters. They work, they are simple, they are protected from crash damage (yes, you will drop the bike or crash sooner or later), one less thing to fail on the road for 6 months at a stretch. Fewer inches of cable housing to rust/gum up, fewer bends in cables, fewer headaches. And as you stated, with practice, the cyclist will get used to it.

One drawback. The brake hoods on my old road bike with Campy Chorus brifters were COMFY! I have never had brake levers that comfortable.

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Old 02-17-19, 02:52 PM
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Agree with the above, my first two Peugeots had them. The only comment I'd make is that I would never go back, for most of the reasons listed above. Yes, they worked fine, but never with the speed of indexed on the brakes or handlebars.

Sometimes progress does get things right.
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Old 02-17-19, 06:49 PM
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Originally Posted by JoeyBike View Post
... The brake hoods on my old road bike with Campy Chorus brifters were COMFY! I have never had brake levers that comfortable.
Have you tried Cane Creek or the older style Tektro brake levers? They are almost a copy of an older Campy style. Yes my Campy was not Chorus, but I can't tell the difference.

I had a photo above in post 5 of my downtube shifter for the front on one of my bikes, the rear is a Campy brifter, photo below, note that the other brake lever is a Tektro. I actually have a right side Tektro on the left side, but in use I can't feel the difference. I picked up the lever used and only the right was available.



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