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Fenders? Smaller tire w/fenders? Or larger tire w/o?

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Fenders? Smaller tire w/fenders? Or larger tire w/o?

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Old 03-15-19, 11:33 AM
  #26  
2manybikes
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
what did you use? I used a mouse pad & binder clips
What do you mean by binder clips?
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Old 03-15-19, 11:40 AM
  #27  
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Personally, there's no way I'd not have fenders on my daily rider. It is 100% fact that I stay cleaner and much dryer with fenders. I've ridden without them plenty, and since having nice ones that really wrap around the tire, there's just no comparison when riding on wet roads. I actually tend to go a step further than most and get the fender that hangs down lowest in front and then add a nice big flap to the bottom of it.
I don't really see needing 2" tires if you're on maintained gravel and paved roads. I wouldn't bother with that, and agree with cyccommute that you're just hauling extra weight that you don't need. I've ridden a gravel rail-to-trail Many times on my 700x35c Vittoria Hypers(very smooth road tread) and literally Never had a problem. I'd think a 40mm+ Almotion would be plenty of tire. Run that with some nice full wrap fenders on the Saga(I'm jealous, btw) and you'll have a pretty sweet set-up.
As for the fender disaster pic, I'm not saying it's wrong or a terrible idea to run fenders on a bike with knobby tread, but personally, I would avoid that. I would definitely use a fender with the quick release attachments if I did. The stick has a nice spot on the tire to wedge against and push into your fender/hardware. I've had things get sucked up between my tire and fender a couple times, where you could hear they were squished between the two, but never had anything get jammed up.
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Old 03-15-19, 01:36 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by 2manybikes View Post
What do you mean by binder clips?
a little clip tip I picked up from another BF contributor. sorry I don't remember who that was. I really should, sorry!






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Old 03-15-19, 02:58 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post

i vote no fenders.
+1
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Old 03-15-19, 03:02 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
a little clip tip I picked up from another BF contributor
Wow, you're protected --> fenders, mudflap, and mudguard! But your riding situation looks like that may be required. Do you tour in those conditions pictured or is that for commuting?
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Old 03-15-19, 03:26 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by BigAura View Post
Do you tour in those conditions pictured or is that for commuting?
nope Iím just a day rider
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Old 03-15-19, 05:03 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by blovejoyGB53 View Post
Well, I am not sure I am proud of it but I have been experimenting with bikes and set-ups for a long while now. I just turned sixty-six so a long while is pretty accurate! I have more bikes than one possibly should (at 9-10 currently) but that number will decrease soon. And those bikes (all steel) range from older (Trek 720, Raleigh Randonneur) to newer, though still old school in design (Rivendell Hilsen, now the Soma, plus a few others, including a 650b conversion). Oh, and a Brompton! There was actually one point in time where I *almost* had a bike with every tire size (16", 20", 26", 650b, 700c, 27"...) though I know there were some types/sizes missing. Actually, the only one of those missing at the moment is the 20". I like Schwalbe tires but also use Compass/Rene Herse tires and Pasela's on the Trek.

I have done some short touring and exploring over the years but never true long distance, or a months-long self-supported trip. I actually went 4 years or so car-free (and by choice!), 2 1/2 of those in Denver, and was quite proud of that. I broke down and bought a car last year (what I term "the ultimate bike accessory") but we'll see if it stays. I am a good rider, and experienced with more than most, but certainly not to the level that others have done. One thing I need to experiment more with is riding a fully loaded bike, making sure I understand how much that will affect handling, gearing, etc.

I will say, I do completely agree with the comments about bigger not necessarily being better. I surprised myself with some almost accidental testing, moving wheels between bikes and being too lazy to change tires. I won't go into details, as it approaches some level of sacrilege and I need to ride them more. But I will say the math (rotational mass, coefficient of friction, and a lot more things that I don't really know enough about), the math is very real(!) and larger volume tires (or just more supple?) should not be assumed to just be automatically better.
in the end, if you can figure out what stuff works for you for a week long trip, without too much stuff, you're good to go for a month or more. Temps and stuff are always going to determine what clothing works for you to be comfortable, and thats the ticket, to be comfortable.

Riding a heavy bike takes a bit getting used to, but no biggie. The main thing is you will be working harder, so you'll be bagged at the end of the day, and you will figure out pretty damn soon if your gearing isnt low enough.
The old estimation of "20 gear inches to 100" is still a pretty good thing to aim for, and as someone about a decade younger than you, do not be shy about putting low gears on your bike, your knees will thank you---really.

have fun mucking about with stuff, and starting to ride with full panniers. Its just a different pace, slower, and you adapt.
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Old 03-15-19, 07:23 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
a little clip tip I picked up from another BF contributor. sorry I don't remember who that was. I really should, sorry!






Thanks. Good photos.
I have some of those, they can be bought at an office supply store.

I just use wire, I bend it around the outside of the fender, bend a small section around the inside on each side and just crimp it with pliers. One benefit of both methods is that if the flap gets caught on something, it can pull off without damaging anything else. I like flaps that almost touch the ground when stopped. Of course then it needs to be very flexible. I use MBT inner tubes folded back on them selves and glued together. One layer will just go back to the original shape of the tube. This makes a flap so soft it moves out of the way for snow even. Or water, rolling over logs etc. Like I see in your ride photos. I enjoy your ride photos.
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Old 03-15-19, 07:43 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by 2manybikes View Post
One benefit of both methods is that if the flap gets caught on something, it can pull off without damaging anything else
yep
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Old 03-15-19, 07:59 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
yep
Like when stepping on the flap when rolling the bike up stairs..... Like my porch for example.
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Old 03-16-19, 07:49 AM
  #36  
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to give you an idea of clearance on my bike, hopefully to avoid stuff jamming.

and this reminds me, I really should move that front fender down a bit, the advantage of it like this is that if I remove my front wheel, the bike can stand on the front rack without the fender getting kinked.
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Old 03-16-19, 10:13 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
to give you an idea of clearance on my bike, hopefully to avoid stuff jamming.
....
That is a good amount of clearance. It is a good thing you do not have V brakes, you might not have the clearance needed for the brake.
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Old 03-16-19, 02:14 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
That is a good amount of clearance. It is a good thing you do not have V brakes, you might not have the clearance needed for the brake.
I thought a lot about clearance, wondering about the possibility of potentially riding in mud and debris, so played it safe clearance wise. Also took into considering putting larger and knobbier tires, and also that bike has horizontal dropouts, so this way I'm able to slide the rear wheel out without having to loosen rear fender.
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